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-   -   Making Insulated window (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f10/making-insulated-window-6103/)

Bdempsey813 02-16-2009 09:34 AM

Making Insulated window
 
:rolleyes:I have done many handyman projects but I have questions about a project that I have intended, namely to insulate some well-made single glaze windows.
This is a mobile home and I have replaced all the original crank out windows with insulated ones.
The glass in the windows of question is set in about 3/8" from the frame surface so my intent is to have glass panes cut about 3/8" larger than the opening. I then would use a hair dryer and warm both the original and new clean glass panes, place a bead of silicon caulk around the perimeter and then quickly install the new glass. Any ideas about how this might work out?

glennjanie 02-16-2009 12:42 PM

Hello BDempsey:
It sounds like a plan to me. The heated glass will create a vacum as it cools down and, if the silicone stays in place during that vacum, it will be a very good insulation job. The way you can tell if it sealed correctly is, both pieces of glass will have a slight bow inward.
Glenn

CraigFL 02-16-2009 01:42 PM

The killer of double pane/insulated glass is leaks that allow moisture to get in between the glass and fog the windows. Commercial double pane glass is made by evacuating the airspace between the glass and filling it with "dry" air or some other dry gas. If what you put in between the glass is dry, you at least have a start where moisture won't condense.

Bdempsey813 02-17-2009 08:30 AM

Making Insulated Window.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bdempsey813 (Post 27765)
:rolleyes:I have done many handyman projects but I have questions about a project that I have intended, namely to insulate some well-made single glaze windows.
This is a mobile home and I have replaced all the original crank out windows with insulated ones.
The glass in the windows of question is set in about 3/8" from the frame surface so my intent is to have glass panes cut about 3/8" larger than the opening. I then would use a hair dryer and warm both the original and new clean glass panes, place a bead of silicon caulk around the perimeter and then quickly install the new glass. Any ideas about how this might work out?

Just had an idea to go along with the original: would it be effective if just prior to sealing I added a dessicant?

jdougn 02-18-2009 07:58 AM

Hello B,

I'm not clear if these windows already have two panes of glass or not? If so, adding an additional pane does not improve energy efficiency enough to warrant adding more glass.

My suggestion is to add storm windows or "window quilts". You will find that adding glass as you describe will fog up and I suspect that the silicone caulk seal will give way within a few years at best.
just my .o2, Doug


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