DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum

DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Windows and Doors (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f10/)
-   -   Need some help (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f10/need-some-help-15990/)

BIGBOY96 05-17-2013 06:33 PM

Need some help
 
3 Attachment(s)
I have a few photos that I would like to show anyone. And I need some advice on what and how I can fix this. This is in my garage also just for the record the way this was done is not the right way right

Attachment 5079



Attachment 5080



Attachment 5081

CallMeVilla 05-18-2013 11:09 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Welcome to the monkey house! AND, many thanks for providing pics -- they really help in giving you quick and more accurate advise.

1. Looks like some nasty water damage ... was this from the old window or since the new one has been installed? If it happened SINCE the new window, your exterior flashing and sealing is bad. You need to remove the window and fix that. Then you need to sand, prime and paint the window stool (most people say "sill"). Then you need to properly re-install the window with sealant, insulation in the voids and trim molding.

2. If the damage was pre-existing and the window is not leaking then great! However, I see no floam sealant around the window and no insulation in the voids. Add that to the window. Clean up the stains, prime and paint, install trim mold, throw a garage party!

:)

(Feel free the "Like" this post) :D

BIGBOY96 05-19-2013 10:12 AM

Ok so I did everything that you had advised me to do my only question is on the inside molding what can I use. What type of wood can I buy to do the fram part of it

Thanks for your help

nealtw 05-19-2013 02:53 PM

I would like to see a photo of the outside and how thick it this wall.

CallMeVilla 05-19-2013 03:19 PM

1 Attachment(s)
You are going to need a mitre saw and probably a table saw (to rip the jamb wood). I put together a picture for you to explain some of the materials you will need. The sides and tops are covered with thin jamb wood cut to fit in the sides (install top first, then sides). The bottom will require a piece of window stool that will have to be notched to fit around the sides of the frame and extend beyond the trim (see pic).

You can pic whatever trim casing you want (from simple to ornate). Since this is a garage you might want to go cheap, unless you are looking to practice. I had a house with un-cased windows and I went wild adding casing, stools and rosettes. Maybe for your next project??

Under the stool, you will want another peice of casing which can be the same dimension as the side casing or thinner. To finish the trim, you need to "return" the ends. This requires cutting a small, triangular piece at 45 degree to turn the casing back into the wall. That might not make sense but look around. You will find this done in nicely done windows everywhere. If you choose NOT to do this (it IS a garage, afterall) it is no crime.

Hope this helps ... and if you want more details, get a book from the library on finish carpentry or go to Home Depot. Start building that DIY library at home!

Garenius 05-20-2013 08:33 AM

Great to see someone like CallMeVilla giving great advice with informative descriptions and pictures. This is what the forum should be about!

CallMeVilla 05-20-2013 03:33 PM

One last suggestion .... since this might be your first step into Big Boy trim carpentry, I found this article for you ... It is a great way to start learning:

http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Projects/Trim/Trim-Carpentry/simple-window-trim-and-door-trim

BIGBOY96 05-20-2013 08:54 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by nealtw (Post 87140)
I would like to see a photo of the outside and how thick it this wall.

Here is a photo of out side

Attachment 5097

nealtw 05-20-2013 09:43 PM

Villa has you covered for the inside with good info. On the ouside you don't have the flashing above the window and you likely don't want to remove it. As the window expands and contracts at a different rate than the stucco, the top and the sides seal needs to be checked yearly, Dig out the loose stuff and seal it with a paintable caulk. Don't caulk the bottom.

WindowsonWashington 05-31-2013 06:35 AM

+1

Stucco walls are going to naturally be leakers because of the reliance on a caulking joint.

All of Villa's details on the flashing were spot on. In addition to that in this case, you need a drip cap above that window to kick the rain flow out away from the window.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:50 AM.