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Old 02-02-2009, 12:02 PM  
WR888
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Default Where can the valves be purchased?

I think the concept of providing "some" ventilation to a failed thermo pane window is worth a try.
Does anyone know a supplier for these one-way valves?



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Old 08-20-2009, 04:19 PM  
Calreno
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Default Thermal Pane Moisture

Do not go this route!! We hired a local Calgary company (ClearVu Thermal) to fix 11 of our windows. What they initially said made sense but the process does not work. Every time the weather changes our windows fog up. On some windows we have more moisture in them than we did before. We have called them on their warranty and they are trying to wriggle out of a refund. The bottom line is the companies that do this are selling a service that doesn't work!! Now we are looking at replacing all the windows, so all that money we paid to this company has gone down the drain. So either replace the entire window or just the glass unit.

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Originally Posted by torontomix View Post
There is a local company that will remove my moisture by drilling two holes in the window (opposite ends) then spray a chemical that basically eats the moisture from inside the window and plug up again.

I’ve drilled glass before and I know how easy it is with the right tools (diamond drill bits etc etc)

My question is if anyone knows what this chemical is called? If they ever done anything like this before and any bumps they might have hit

Thanks guys
Dan


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Old 06-23-2010, 11:27 AM  
dexter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calreno View Post
Do not go this route!! We hired a local Calgary company (ClearVu Thermal) to fix 11 of our windows. What they initially said made sense but the process does not work. Every time the weather changes our windows fog up. On some windows we have more moisture in them than we did before. We have called them on their warranty and they are trying to wriggle out of a refund. The bottom line is the companies that do this are selling a service that doesn't work!! Now we are looking at replacing all the windows, so all that money we paid to this company has gone down the drain. So either replace the entire window or just the glass unit.
I hired this same company 5 years ago to take the moisture out of 6 of my windows and to this day they are still clear and dry so the process must work somehow. As for the warranty, they came back to reinstall a small plastic valve that came off the glass 2 years ago no problem. Because my windows are wood framed, I do need to paint them every 2-3 years and make sure the caulking is in tip top shape, I believe this is part of the warranty requirement.
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Old 07-22-2010, 08:01 AM  
Calrenoguy
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I had this company (clear vu thermal) over last month to do some repairs. My windows look great and haven't got wet at all. I was referred by a friend who had (clear vu thermal) over to do repairs 3 years ago. Her windows dry still dry to this date. I had the fog guy for a quote and he seemed very disinterested in doing the work and wasn't professional at all. It seemed as though he was trying to constantly undermine his competitors. Being a business professional myself I find that practice very unethical and although he claimed to cost less I would rather hire a company who are both professional and come highly recommended from a number of sources such as clear vu thermal.

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Old 08-24-2010, 02:57 PM  
Calreno
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Default Moisture in panes

In reply to the person who had Clear Vu out to do their windows, you are lucky. It has been a year and every window this company "fixed" has moisture, in fact in some cases there is more moisture now. We had phoned the guy to come out and see the problem because they are supposed to warranty their service. The owner Alan Ring was very unprofessional and gave us the run around. We have issued a formal complaint with the BBB but all they could do was send us to mediation which again Mr. Ring tried desperatly to wriggle out of. If your windows have moisture they need replacing. That is the only solution. This little vent system is a gimmick, waste of money and just doesn't work. The only way I can see this system working is on a North facing window with very little sun exposure. Do not hire Clear Vu it is a gimmick and it is unbelievable that these guys are still in business. As for our continuing problem, we are slowly replacing all the windows. We are persuing legal action against this company.

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Old 08-27-2010, 01:37 AM  
everhart011
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Default hi

Thanks for sharing the information.

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Old 09-04-2010, 10:49 AM  
davidHandyman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calreno View Post
Do not go this route!! We hired a local Calgary company (ClearVu Thermal) to fix 11 of our windows. What they initially said made sense but the process does not work. Every time the weather changes our windows fog up. On some windows we have more moisture in them than we did before. We have called them on their warranty and they are trying to wriggle out of a refund. The bottom line is the companies that do this are selling a service that doesn't work!! Now we are looking at replacing all the windows, so all that money we paid to this company has gone down the drain. So either replace the entire window or just the glass unit.
I agree I've had this done and it didn't work out well in my older home. Maybe it was just the company I went with and their shoddy service. But nowadays the vinyl windows are durable and temperature resistant they last many many years! Better off replacing them with new age technology and materials than trying to bandaid fix old windows.
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Old 11-27-2010, 03:18 PM  
thermoklear
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Default Removing Moisture from double pane windows

I am in the window installation and repair business and noticed there are a lot of people interested in this subject....and lots of misunderstandings on the subject. So.......

How important is the seal in a sealed unit? The seal is only there to keep the two interior surfaces of the glass unit clear and dry...the seal has very, very little to do with any insulating properties, Double glazing gets some of its insulation properties from the air-space between the glass lites and some from the glass lites themselves. BUT glass is a heat conductor!! Cookware made by Pyrex, Corning and Anchor-Hocking is made of glass because in is an excellent heat conductor. Each 3mm (1/8") thick lite of glass has an R-factor (insulating value) of about .65. A half-inch airspace has an R-factor of .5, therefore an average sealed unit or IGU (insulating glass unit) has an R-Factor of about 1.8 which is usually rounded to 2. Adding argon or krypton gas to the air-space adds about .2 R to the IGU. When someone says their energy efficient windows have an R-factor of anything greater than 2 they are providing a result for an average size window that includes the framing and sashes. When you ask what the R-factor is for any part of glass area in their window it is still about 2 -- give or take a little for the glass thickness and the width of the spacer bar.

Pella windows look like they have a sealed unit but are actually a double-glazed unit with a removeable interior panel (new ones can be tripled-glazed with a dual-pane sealed unit as the exterior glazing) but they have four "breather holes" or vents between the glass panels instead of a "seal". The vent holes allow household moisture that gets into the space between the glass panels to escape to the outside atmosphere, Condensation may periodically appear on the interior surface of the outside pane of glass but the vent holes allow the moisure to escape. Pella is viewed to be the best and their design is not a "gimmick"

The process of drilling and venting a "foggy" sealed unit is simply turning a failed sealed unit into a low cost variation of a Pella window.

The venting process will ALWAYS and PERMANENTLY dry out a sealed unit as long as one condition exists...Less moisture GETS IN thru the seal failure than GETS OUT thru the vent. The reason for this is Boyle's Law which states that gas (water vapour) densities will try to equalize (the water vapour density inside the "sealed unit" with water vapour density in the outside atmosphere).

If a "defogging" serviced IGU does not stay dry it is because more moisture gets in than escapes. The moisture inside the sealed unit almost always comes from inside the house although it can sometimes gets in past old or poorly done exterior caulking. The standards organization for IGUs is IGMA (Insulating Glass Manufacturers Assoc.) and they specify that there should be drain holes provided below an installed IGU to drain any possible accumualtion of water. Many window maufacturers do not install drain holes because they detract from look of their window and then water collects where it can get into the IGU.

Calreno's problem is not with ClearVu, but with the humidity levels inside his home and the condition of the interior or exterio glazing of his windows. Those factors are allowing more moisture IN than gets OUT. The extent of the seal failure (what is often called a rupture) may have been too large to begin with. In that situation a double vent may solve the problem.

The venting process is a repair that saves money and is green to boot. Glass is very energy intensive to make and transport, and glass in a landfill will last forever.

For best results with the drilling and venting process the "foggy" problem should b e addressed as soon as possible. Counter-intuitively, the sooner a sealed unit is serviced with the preventive venting process the longer it will last.

We had a former Pella window sales rep do the venting to all the windows in a home he bought because he realized the advantages of doing it.

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Old 01-03-2011, 04:28 PM  
nopho
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Default Thank you thermoklear

Ive been very interested in this technology and looking to add it to my window cleaning service. your answer definitely cleared things up for me. (no pun intended) ive deal with pella windows periodically and if they are facing the sun they will usually fog up due to moisture left behind from cleaning but always clear up several minutes later so what you you've explained about the venting process makes perfect sense. thanks again for posting!

"life of a window cleaner is just one pane after another."

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Old 04-04-2011, 01:10 PM  
liderbug
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Default

We have a bay window, 5 sections, 2 windows per section - ea 22x28. Quote: "Sure, we'll remove the whole unit and replace it with $4,000 worth of new ....". We're both retired and ... well... ain't an option.

So I'm thinking: Make 1 new replacement. Then swap out the first pane. Disassemble and clean the original really good with stove top glass cleaner, vinegar, distilled water using newspaper & a hair dryer. Throw the old aluminium away, install Super Spacer and new desiccant in the dividers and a covering of silicone. Then swap for the next section and repeat. I'd like to use Argon - minor problem - best quote I can get is $300 for an empty tank and $$$ to fill it. Things that have gone through my mind: I can get helium from the local party store for $15 - enough to do ... 500 windows. I can get difluoroethane (canned air - computers) at about the same price. Is there anything else I could fill the windows with?

Thoughts? Gotcha's?

Edgetech I.G. - Super Spacer Application Video

Thanks



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