DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum

DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Garden and Lawncare (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f103/)
-   -   This one is news to me (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f103/one-news-me-15478/)

Wuzzat? 01-30-2013 04:39 PM

This one is news to me
 
and it looks safe.

nealtw 01-30-2013 04:47 PM

I was waiting for the tree to fall on his trailer. It's not fool proof as it still requires human hands.

Wuzzat? 01-30-2013 05:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nealtw (Post 82898)
I was waiting for the tree to fall on his trailer. It's not fool proof as it still requires human hands.

There are plenty of videos with trees crushing perfectly good trucks, decks, houses, porches, etc. :eek:

With some of these accidents I know the error. Other trees split up the middle and with these I'm not so sure.

This one is pretty good
and I realize after watching it that in some cases I was just lucky.

I'm definitely afraid of Widowmakers.

BridgeMan 02-05-2013 08:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wuzzat? (Post 82900)
I'm definitely afraid of Widowmakers.

Simple solution for that--just don't get married.

Austin 02-06-2013 08:30 AM

We have some trees along the fence line that need to be cut down. I'll talk to my neighbor about the tongue and groove system. We're trying not to destroy his fence.

Wuzzat? 02-06-2013 03:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Austin (Post 83226)
We have some trees along the fence line that need to be cut down. I'll talk to my neighbor about the tongue and groove system. We're trying not to destroy his fence.

On a windless day anchor a rope high up before any cuts are made. The leverage you get does wonders for trees that want to misbehave.

Almost all the tree cutting books I've read began with "In memory of. . ." :(

Quote:

Originally Posted by BridgeMan (Post 83212)
Simple solution for that--just don't get married.

Yes, and since most accidents happen within 25 miles of home all you have to do is move.

And doctors kill more people than guns so ban docs and not guns.
:D

Austin 02-07-2013 08:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wuzzat? (Post 83241)
On a windless day anchor a rope high up before any cuts are made. The leverage you get does wonders for trees that want to misbehave.

Almost all the tree cutting books I've read began with "In memory of. . ." :(

Ill keep than in mind.

I have tied off in the past, it helped quite a bit.

Wuzzat? 02-07-2013 03:54 PM

BTW, the notch cut is supposed to go 1/3 into the tree diameter.

After some searching on chords and circles, one way to do this for a round tree is:
measure the circumference [let's say 36"]
calculate 40% of this [.4 x36 = .2 x 72 = 14.4]
mark your tree using a tape to measure this cut line.

This 14" horiz. wraparound mark should be centered on the direction of fall.

nealtw 02-07-2013 04:57 PM

Back the school for you boy!
36" circumference is about a 12" diameter, your notch would be about 4"

Wuzzat? 02-08-2013 10:44 AM

Yes, cutting using the 14" wrap-around line should give you the 4" notch depth.
it works on paper and in a few months I can try it out on a pine tree.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:22 AM.