DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Insulation and Radiant Barriers > Insulating a bonus room cathedral ceiling




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-05-2013, 10:36 AM  
wargle
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 6
Default Insulating a bonus room cathedral ceiling

My son's house is in central Alabama. It has a pyramid style roof with a gable roof over the attached garage. The unfinished bonus room is over the garage and has a cathedral style ceiling. the rafters are 2x6. It's 68" from the top of the knee wall on each side to the collar ties. The collar ties are 8' above the floor. the floor is on 2x12's and is insulated over the garage. He wants to finish the bonus room and we don't know what to do about insulating the ceiling from the knee wall to the collar ties. There is no ridge vent on the roof over the bonus room and the rest of the roof is vented with two of the old fashioned turbines and there are sofitt vents all around the house. I can furr down with a 2x on the rafters to make them 7" deep. I am considering doing this and using some R30 batts slightly compressed with a 1/2" foam panel at each end of the batts to stop any air flow through the batts. The knee walls will also get batts and 1/2" drywall over all. Will this work since there is no ridge vent over the bonus room? The small area above the collar ties will be open to the pyramid portion of the roof as will the area behind the knee walls. I don't want to have to deal with trying to put up some sort of additional vent on the 12-12 pitch pyramid roof and spray foam insulation is too $$$.



__________________
wargle is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-05-2013, 03:04 PM  
robertwc
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 2
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wargle View Post
My son's house is in central Alabama. It has a pyramid style roof with a gable roof over the attached garage. The unfinished bonus room is over the garage and has a cathedral style ceiling. the rafters are 2x6. It's 68" from the top of the knee wall on each side to the collar ties. The collar ties are 8' above the floor. the floor is on 2x12's and is insulated over the garage. He wants to finish the bonus room and we don't know what to do about insulating the ceiling from the knee wall to the collar ties. There is no ridge vent on the roof over the bonus room and the rest of the roof is vented with two of the old fashioned turbines and there are sofitt vents all around the house. I can furr down with a 2x on the rafters to make them 7" deep. I am considering doing this and using some R30 batts slightly compressed with a 1/2" foam panel at each end of the batts to stop any air flow through the batts. The knee walls will also get batts and 1/2" drywall over all. Will this work since there is no ridge vent over the bonus room? The small area above the collar ties will be open to the pyramid portion of the roof as will the area behind the knee walls. I don't want to have to deal with trying to put up some sort of additional vent on the 12-12 pitch pyramid roof and spray foam insulation is too $$$.
I understand that you may think that spf is too much money. But, consider this. If you use spf then you would not have to vent the attic portion or incerase the size of your ac. What you suggested is not a bad approach, but if you check out some other homes that have spf in them you would see that your heat gain would be minimalized with it. In this day and age most people are looking for their best bang for the buck. With spf your electricity cost for adding the bonus room would be minimal compared to any other form of insulation. Spf will also allow the room to be more comfortable in the heat of the day even in the middle of the summer.


__________________
robertwc is offline  
WindowsonWashington Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-06-2013, 10:14 AM  
nealtw
Contractor
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: vancouver, b.c.
Posts: 10,272
Liked 848 Times on 757 Posts
Likes Given: 1465

Default

If you don't take the advice givin by robertwc, your plan is the way to go but if the attic is connected to the higher roof it does not want vents. The question is, are the vents on the higher roof big enough to handle both.

__________________
nealtw is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2013, 01:25 PM  
Perry525
Senior Member
 
Perry525's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lake Wales, Fl.
Posts: 112
Liked 11 Times on 7 Posts

Default Roof vents.

Roof vents are not a good idea.
When the wind blows over a roof, the roof acts like an aircraft's wing trying to lift off, this effect creates a low pressure area to the lee of the roof, that pulls air into the roof and out of the roof.
This means on hot days hot air is pulled into the home.
On cold days cold air is pulled into the home.
It is better to have a sealed air tight roof, with plenty of polystyrene board below it, to provide insulation, from the sun's heat coming inwards and your expensive warm air going out during the winter.

__________________
Perry525 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-31-2013, 06:26 AM  
WindowsonWashington
Junior Member
 
WindowsonWashington's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Washington, DC, Virginia
Posts: 198
Liked 19 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 28

Default

If you don't vent it, SPF is best and easiest. If you do vent it, consider furring down the framing as you mentioned to get additional rafter total depths so that you can properly insulate while still leaving a 2" ventable space.

Rigid foam works well in these cases.

__________________
WindowsonWashington is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-01-2013, 04:49 AM  
Perry525
Senior Member
 
Perry525's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lake Wales, Fl.
Posts: 112
Liked 11 Times on 7 Posts

Default Alabama

Quote:
Originally Posted by WindowsonWashington View Post
If you don't vent it, SPF is best and easiest. If you do vent it, consider furring down the framing as you mentioned to get additional rafter total depths so that you can properly insulate while still leaving a 2" ventable space.

Rigid foam works well in these cases.
Alabama is warm with high humidity.
I imagine you want to keep the heat out?
Keep in mind that the heat of the sun is mainly transferred by conduction.
You will want the rafters and the roof isolated from the air inside.

Leaving a two inch gap between the roof and the insulation, in most cases will provide a gap for air movement, to dry off any rain that may seep through. In this case you will encourage hot air into the room.

You want to totally enclose the roof and rafters to stop the transfer of heat, (as much as you can) through the roof. Keep in mind that 13 inches of polystyrene will stop most conduction, but you have to be practical and probably settle for less. Filling the gaps between the rafters, then covering the rafters with three inches of polystyrene, then adding more rafters and more polystyrene will make a real difference.

Then you need to think about the walls facing the sun.
__________________
Perry525 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-01-2013, 07:19 AM  
WindowsonWashington
Junior Member
 
WindowsonWashington's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Washington, DC, Virginia
Posts: 198
Liked 19 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 28

Default

Providing for venting is not for the purpose of drying out any rain that might enter the roof structure. That should be handled by the shingles.

A picture of the exterior would help as well.

How is the ceiling height on the interior? That will determine whether or not furring down the interior is worthwhile.

__________________
WindowsonWashington is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-01-2013, 11:45 AM  
Perry525
Senior Member
 
Perry525's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lake Wales, Fl.
Posts: 112
Liked 11 Times on 7 Posts

Default Ice dams

Quote:
Originally Posted by WindowsonWashington View Post
Providing for venting is not for the purpose of drying out any rain that might enter the roof structure. That should be handled by the shingles.

A picture of the exterior would help as well.

How is the ceiling height on the interior? That will determine whether or not furring down the interior is worthwhile.
Many people over the years, in many places, have found that shingles do not keep out the rising snow melt on their roofs.
While this is certainly not a problem in Alabama?
Kindly advise why you thing a two inch gap is desirable?
__________________
Perry525 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-01-2013, 01:03 PM  
WindowsonWashington
Junior Member
 
WindowsonWashington's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Washington, DC, Virginia
Posts: 198
Liked 19 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 28

Default

The two inch gap between the underside of the sheathing and the insulation would be recommended if the roof system were vented via soffit and ridge vent combination.

If the assembly is not vented, insulate the entire cavity and preferably with spray foam.

Venting of the roof assembly has nothing to do with snow and everything to do with humidity.

__________________
WindowsonWashington is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-01-2013, 09:38 PM  
GBR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 337
Liked 18 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

2" is best, but not in a hot/humid climate;
"In vented cathedral ceiling assemblies a minimum 2-inch clear airspace is recommended between the underside of the roof deck and the top of the cavity insulation. This is not a code requirement but ought to be (only 1-inch is typically specified in the model codes). It is the author’s experience that typical installation practices and construction tolerances do not result in an airspace of at least 1 inch and rarely is it “clear.” Even when 2” clear space is provided, the rate of ventilation flow will be significantly less than in an open ventilated attic."

"In hot climates, the primary purpose of attic or roof ventilation is to expel solar heated hot air from the attic to lessen the building cooling load. The amount of cooling provided by a well ventilated roof exposed to the sun is very small. Field monitoring of numerous attics has confirmed that the temperature of the roof sheathing of a unvented roof will rise by a few to no more than 10 F more than a well ventilated attic." From; http://www.buildingscience.com/documents/digests/bsd-102-understanding-attic-ventilation?full_view=1

Test results show increasing the ventilation rate from 1/300 to 1/150; pp.7---- almost no difference in shingle temps; pp.8----4*F difference in plywood sheathing temp., pp.10--- less than 1% annual net effect for heating/cooling; http://www.buildingscience.com/documents/reports/rr-9801-vented-and-sealed-attics-in-hot-climates

From pp7; " With 1:300 vent area, adding the radiant barrier system
reduced the ceiling flux by 26%. Increasing the vent area to 1:150 improved the reduction to 36% (an additional 10 percentage point reduction) while increasing the relative humidity in the attic by
6-10%. The average humidity without the radiant barrier system and with 1:300 was 53%, when the radiant barrier system was added the average was 54%, and when the vent area was increased
to 1:150 the average relative humidity increased to 62%." From; http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=attic%20venting%20in%20hot%20humi d%20climate&source=web&cd=6&ved=0CF4QFjAF&url=http %3A%2F%2Fwww.floridabuilding.org%2FFBC%2Fpublicati ons%2FAtticVentReportFinal.pdf&ei=DfBZUd-xDIfsiQLLmoGoBw&usg=AFQjCNHp4qU3vWO1vNceVxn2LqAJmH 81PA&cad=rja

Gary



__________________
GBR is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter DIY Home Repair Forum Replies Last Post
Cathedral/vaulted ceiling in mobile home-insulation Fredartic Insulation and Radiant Barriers 2 04-16-2013 11:46 PM
Cathedral ceiling - how much venting do I need? Shawner Roofing and Siding 14 10-23-2012 07:49 PM
How about a cathedral ceiling - Check it Out Andrews Framing and Foundation 4 05-12-2009 12:28 PM
Bonus Room Stair Conundrum... Help! jpeterson General Home Improvement Discussion 5 07-13-2008 08:16 PM
Cathedral ceiling support? xdissent Framing and Foundation 4 10-03-2007 12:36 PM