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-   -   Exterior: Brush/Roll or Spray (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f107/exterior-brush-roll-spray-16868/)

oldpaintdoc 04-30-2012 06:43 PM

Exterior: Brush/Roll or Spray
 
Lets hear the pros and cons of exterior painting.

Comparing Brush and roll to spraying.

I run a 2 man crew and do not see spraying as an efficient way for us.

Tell me what ya think.

havasu 04-30-2012 08:59 PM

I have done a few exteriors and believe the best results are to spray (gets coverage in all the nooks and crannies) then immediately roll to get great blended coverage.

Schmidt & Co. 04-30-2012 09:04 PM

I'm in a little different situation than most of you. Here in Chicago, most homes are brick. All I'm really ever painting are eaves, windows, doors etc. I will spray lattice and porch ceilings, but some years I can go a whole summer without breaking out the sprayer on exteriors.

I'm also always concerned about over spray, as the houses are packed close together here. I guess you could say that I'm usually in the "No exterior spray" camp. But won't hesitate to switch to spraying if the conditions are right.

havasu 04-30-2012 10:51 PM

I really love those "all brick" homes. A little eave painting and you've painted the entire house. Easy-peasy!

mpminter 05-01-2012 05:11 AM

I'm a spray/back brush guy. The sprayer is simply a paint delivery system, and I've never seen a more efficient way to get the paint from the bucket to the side of the house. Once the paint is on the building, my brush takes over and works it into all the surface and spreads it to an even coat. I find spraying to be a cleaner way to paint with less risk of dropping or knocking over a bucket. You do have to be mindful of the wind and the proximity of vehicles and other houses, but I find that if you keep the pressure dialed way down the overspray is actually very minimal. I have also played around with using fine finish tips as you can cut the pressure down really low and still have a pretty nice fan.

Austin 05-01-2012 09:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by havasu (Post 472)
I really love those "all brick" homes. A little eave painting and you've painted the entire house. Easy-peasy!

Got that right, but like in my case, the ugly brick limits what colors you can paint.

havasu 05-01-2012 09:49 AM

I imaging ugly bricks could limit your choices, but you could always re-face it with another medium and hide the bricks.

imported_Workaholic 05-01-2012 05:58 PM

I like to spray and back roll or back brush when it makes sense but it does not always make sense as like Paul there is a lot of brick.

So when I feel it makes sense I will but for all the other times it is brush and roll.

Austin 05-02-2012 10:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by havasu (Post 484)
I imaging ugly bricks could limit your choices, but you could always re-face it with another medium and hide the bricks.

They property owner won't let me.

They are really strict on what I can and cannot do.

billhead1 06-09-2012 07:29 PM

On the second coat, I paint soffits with a 3/8" or 1/2" lambswool roller, then backbrush just enough to knock down the stipple from the roller. According to Purdy, overbrushing paint exposes too much of the coating to the air, causing the resins to evaporate to fast. This leads to a rough or splotchy appearance. Also, on the second coat, to cut in, I use a Hyde CornerEase roller with a lambswool cover. The reason for brushing the first coat is to ensure that all cracks and crevices are filled with paint. Cutting in the second coat with the CornerEase, followed by rolling and backbrushing the second coat is faster than brushing. You can also use the CornerEase to roll in tight spots like the area around exterior light fixtures, etc. I put both the roller and the CornerEase on an extension pole and use a 5 gallon bucket with a grid to speed up the job. You have to be sure you keep a wet edge, so it's best to have 2 people when using this method, or rolling from joint to joint on plywood soffits (about 8 feet) if you do the job alone.
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