DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Painting Forum > Have to use oil enamel paint on interior wood doors?





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Old 07-06-2010, 03:19 PM  
Nestor_Kelebay
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I would clean them with a weak soap solution (to remove any cigarette smoke that may be on them, allow time for them to dry, and then apply a wiping polyurethane to them using a rag.



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Old 07-06-2010, 04:48 PM  
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Thanks Nestor. Another site has this to say, which might be of interest to you. note that subject discussed there is an external door, more subject to seasonal movement. also note the possible negatives on urethane.

Thanks.

"In terms of work involved, the polyurethane will probably give longer life without period maintenance. However, if you let the finish deteriorate you will have to do a complete stripping of the door. Tung oil requires periodic maintenance coats, usually yearly, but these are relatively simple - just clean and wipe on more oil.

If you like a high gloss look, you will never get it with tung or linseed oil. You can get a lustrous sheen, but not gloss. Many woodworkers feel that a polyurethane gives a somewhat plasticy look.

If you go the "varnish" route, consider a spar varnish such as McCloskey's. A true spar varnish is made from natural resins. It forms a durable, flexible coating. If you have a panel door, the flexiblity is important. The panels in entry and garage doors move with the variations of humidity with the seasons. The panels are purposely not glued into their slots. If they were not given room to expand, they would crack. Polyurethanes are very hard and brittle. As the panels move, the bead of coating where the panel meets the rail or stile breaks, allowing water to work its way into the wood. Then the sun beats on the door and vapor pressure is created in the wood. Peeling results. Pay attention to the seam at the bottom of the panel where it meets the rail. This is where water damage will first become evident.

Over the years, I have finished many new fine garage doors of redwood, hemlock etc. Often the manufacturer would put a label on the door stating that if polyurethane was used on the door, the company would void its warranty

If you decide of tung oil, make sure you are using real tung oil. Many products labeled as "tung oil finish" actually don't even contain tung oil.

Many people do not like linseed oil as it can blacken the wood. Some manufacturers have stopped using linseed oil as the base for their stains for this reason. Linseed oil has nutriant value for mildew.

However you decide to treat your door, do not forget the top and bottom edges of the door, especially the bottom! The cross grain cut of the door rails will wick water up into the door leading to failure of the finish and warping of the door."



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Old 07-06-2010, 05:55 PM  
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I wouldn't recommend putting polyurethane on a wooden EXTERIOR door because oil based polyurethane is an interior oil based coating and dries too hard to have the elasticity needed to stretch and shrink with wood outdoors. However, you don't have the changes in humidity indoors like you do outside and so you don't get the dimensional changes in wood indoors like you do outside. Polyurethane will be fine on your doors inside.

The guy makes the point that "a true spar varnish is made from natural resins". Not too put too fine a point on it, but any true varnish is made from natural resins (called "copals") dissolved in a drying oil (like linseed, safflower, oiticia, Tung or other drying oil). Every real varnish is made by dissolving copals (which are the dried and hardened sap of certain trees) in a drying oil.

I recommended a wiping varnish because you apply it in thin coats using a rag. That avoids the problems typically associated with brushes, like brush strokes. And, if you ever wanted to refinish your doors, it would be the same amount of work regardless of whether they had linseed oil, Tung oil, paint or polyurethane on them. You'd have to strip those coatings off with the same paint stripper, and so the stripping process wouldn't be any faster or easier using a drying oil instead of polyurethane.

This business about having to maintain linseed oil or Tung oil annually is something I've never heard of, and it makes me wonder what he's thinking. Prior to modern alkyd paints, oil based paints were all linseed oil based, and consisted of pigments suspended in what they called "Boiled linseed oil, which was just linseed oil with chemicals added to make it dry faster when exposed to air. No one ever repainted their doors every year as this guy is suggesting was normal to do when using straight linseed oil as the finish. Putting a new coat of drying oil on your door every year would essentially be the equivalent of repainting it with a linseed oil based paint every year, and I've never heard of anyone doing that, presumably because it wasn't necessary to do it.

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Old 07-06-2010, 06:27 PM  
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thanks very much nestor, i'll go pick up a wiping urethane/varnish and seems like i can do it once and be done with it. hope they sell water-based so the smell won't be too bad.

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Old 07-07-2010, 11:19 AM  
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I would go with the oil based wipe on poly.

Hydrocarbon solvents fall into two classes; aliphatic and aromatic. The aliphatic hydrocarbon solvents like (propane and butane) have virtually no smell at all; it's the aromatic hydrocarbons that tend to smell a lot. To make low-odor paint thinners, they simply separate the two kinds of hydrocarbons, and only use the aliphatic ones for oil based coatings.

With the oil based wipe-on polyurethane, you know you're getting a product that's going to give you a hard, durable finish. The water based one might work fine for you, but whether the finish will be as hard and durable is something I really don't know. If it wuz me, I would go with the oil based wipe on poly just because I know it's going to provide a durable finish, whereas any other chemistry is something I wouldn't be as confident in.

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Old 09-01-2010, 09:16 AM  
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thanks for the tips Dennis. I finally finished the job a month ago; used an oil-based polyurethane. Painting these old doors would have been a chore, and since the frames are very tight there could have been closure and sticking issues after. There had already been some kind of varnish on the door and probably some solvent residue so the finish doesn't look perfect--areas where it didn't take. next time I'd probably sand it down more or apply a tougher cleaner, but overall they look much better.

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Old 09-01-2010, 11:35 AM  
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Tung oil dries to a harder film that doesn't yellow as much as linseed oil.

Neither Tung oil nor linseed oil dries to as hard a film as polyurethane.

If you want to get a hard glossy finish on those doors, I would use a wipe-on polyurethane to avoid brush strokes. I think Minwax wipe on poly comes in both satin, semigloss and high gloss, but I'm not sure because I've only used the gloss.

If the doors were varnished prior to the mid-1980's, you should be able to wash them with TSP to etch the gloss, rinse the TSP off with clean water, allow time to dry, and apply the wipe on Poly directly over the etched varnish.

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Old 01-16-2011, 05:15 PM  
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my dog actually peed on my doors. Of course this made them smell. Got an answer.....no stripping necessary. Use KILLS or BIN as your primer and paint your color over that. Takes all smells away. Even pee! Another thing you can do right before hand is to take a spray bottle with 1/2 white vinegar (heat in microwave until hot taking care not to melt the bottle) then add 1/2 dawn dish soap. Shake gently. Spray and scrub. Then wipe down with water. This helps with smells

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Old 02-08-2011, 12:04 AM  
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There are several things to consider before buying a solid wood door. Among the most important of these issues are the price of the door, the function of the door, and how much care you are willing to put into the door. All these things will affect the type of door that should be chosen to buy and install.

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Old 05-15-2011, 07:41 AM  
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Anyone getting nailed by the lead laws. I am a roofer and I am starting to feel it. The laws just went to far.

Shane
www.roofing-maine.com



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