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Old 05-06-2009, 04:47 AM  
PearlWhiteGT
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Default Interior Paint

I want to paint my interior walls. As of now, it has a Flat color to them & I really don't like it. I have heard lots of bad stuff about Behr paints so I want to know which interior paint I should use. Is Sherman Williams paint any good? What about the paint from Lowe's?



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Old 05-06-2009, 12:21 PM  
glennjanie
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Hello PearlWhiteGT:
You have mentioned three good paints as far as I'm concerned. In my remodeling business I have used hundreds of gallons of WalMart paint with never a hitch or complaint.
I prefer latex enamel paint because it will stay cleaner and be easier to clean when necessary. The smooth surface releases dirt easier. It does require a well-finished wall though.
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Old 05-07-2009, 12:29 AM  
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There are a few basic things everyone should know about paint:

1. Don't use your standard wall paint in the bathroom. If you do, you're likely to get paint cracking and peeling on the ceiling above the shower or tub and high up on the wall where the highest humidity is and condensation forms. Use a paint specifically meant for bathrooms like Zinsser's PermaWhite Bathroom paint.

The reason why is that there are three different kinds of resins used to make latex paint:
1. acrylic (typically called "100% Acrylic" in paintspeak)
2. vinyl acrylic
3. styrenated acrylic.

Not only will Bathroom paints use acrylic resins, which have the best moisture resistance, but they will use the most moisture resistant 100% acrylic resins available. "Budget Priced" paints typically use Vinyl acrylic resins which have poor moisture resistance, and the result is that these paints will soften and peel when they get wet or under humid conditions. The resultant peeling paint is often misdiagnosed as poor surface prep before painting. Also, bathroom paints will have much more mildewcide in them to prevent mildew growing on the paint.

2. Two good tests of paint quality are both hardness and hide. The biggest hunk of the cost of a gallon of paint is the cost for the resin "binder", which is the plastic that forms the film. The higher quality the latex binder in the paint, the harder the film it will dry to. That's cuz the harder the paint film, the less easily it will be damaged. So, If something is rubbing against the wall, like a bed head board, it leaves less of a mark, also you get fewer "scuffs" that can't be cleaned off and need to be painted over, and cleaning marks off walls won't dull the paint's gloss nearly as much. Cleaning a mark off a wall only to have the resulting dull area stand out when light from the window reflects off the wall is a kick in the rear cuz it looks way worse the original mark.

3. Since the binder in paints will dry to a clear or transluscent film, hide in paints comes entirely from the pigments in the paint. In the case of white, or off-white paints, the ability of the paint to hide an underlying colour depends largely on the amount and type of the white pigment titanium dioxide there is in it. Within limits, the greater the amount of titanium dioxide of the right particle size, the better the paint will hide. Since titanium dioxide is the most expensive of the white pigments, higher quality paint will normally contain more titanium dioxide, will hide better and will cost more. Lower quality paints will use other white pigments like zinc oxide, lithopone, calcium carbonate (aka:chalk) and magnesium silicate (aka: talc). These white pigments don't hide as well, but they don't cost as much either, so they're often used in less expensive paints.
Titanium Dioxide in Coatings - White Pigment - Opacifying Center - TiO2 - SpecialChem for coatings and inks

4. All things being equal, a paint with higher gloss will be easier to clean but won't hide an underlying colour as well. A paint with lower gloss will be harder to clean, but will hide an underlying colour better. The reason for the hide to depend on the gloss is because the lower the gloss of the paint, the more "extender pigment" there is in it. Extender pigments are huge rocks almost large enough to see with the naked eye. It's by adding extender pigments to paints that you make paints dry to flatter glosses. Without extender pigments, all paints would dry to a high gloss. Those extender pigments improve hide by scattering light. Think of shining a flashlight through an aquarium to see a coloured wall on the other side of the aquarium. You could easily see the colour of the wall. Now, pour glass marbles into the aquarium instead of water. If you now shine the flashlight through the aquarium, the colour will be very much fainter because much less of the light from the flashlight could make it all the way through the marbles, reflect off the coloured wall and make it all the way back through the marbles to your eye again. Most of the light you'd see would come into the aquarium through the sides, top and bottom and reflect and refract until it eventually hit your eye, and that light would not be the colour of the wall on the other side of the aquarium.

(you can prove this with a simple experiment. Try looking through a 2 inch high stack of microscope slides. You can look through a slab of glass 2 inches thick, but not a stack of glass microscope slides 2 inches high. The reason why is that 6% of the incident is reflected back to your eye at the surface of each microscope slide, so that the stack of glass slides is completely opaque, while the 2 inch thick slab of glass is almost completely transparent.

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Old 05-21-2009, 07:11 AM  
fuji0030
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All things accepting equal, a acrylic with academy actualization will be easier to apple-pie but will not adumbrate an basal colour as well. A acrylic with lower actualization will be harder to clean, but will adumbrate an basal colour better. The accuracy for the adumbrate to depend on the actualization is because the lower the actualization of the paint, the added "extender pigment" there is in it. Extender pigments are huge rocks about abounding abounding to see with the naked eye. It's by abacus extender pigments to paints that you achieve paints dry to adulate glosses. Without extender pigments, all paints would dry to a top gloss.

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Old 05-21-2009, 09:06 AM  
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Couldna said it better myself, Fuji.

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Old 08-20-2009, 01:47 PM  
kwmainer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fuji0030 View Post
All things accepting equal, a acrylic with academy actualization will be easier to apple-pie but will not adumbrate an basal colour as well. A acrylic with lower actualization will be harder to clean, but will adumbrate an basal colour better. The accuracy for the adumbrate to depend on the actualization is because the lower the actualization of the paint, the added "extender pigment" there is in it. Extender pigments are huge rocks about abounding abounding to see with the naked eye. It's by abacus extender pigments to paints that you achieve paints dry to adulate glosses. Without extender pigments, all paints would dry to a top gloss.
What? lol! Seriously, I get it. I think. Gosh, and I'm still buying "oops" paint at Colorwheel..... especially their industrial stuff. Recently used aquaindustrial acrylic high gloss in my kitchen (walls). What a pain to paint! Drip, slag... gotta brush or pad it till it's more than tacky dry. And it takes 3 coats, not two. But... the resulting finish is a nice color, looks and feels as durable as concrete. And so far, I've been able to wipe up everything that cats, husbands and visiting kids have sprayed on the walls.

I only use Colorwheel paints, I've never tried Home Depot/Lowes paints (or walmart either).

....
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Old 08-21-2009, 07:13 AM  
JALEXED2
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I have had very good success with both Sherwin Williams and Behr paint. You may have heard some "bad" things about Behr from a painting contractor. As I understand it, they don't like it because they have to thin the paint to work with their equipment. Painting contractors like to stay with one (or only a few) suppliers of paint so it would not be unusual to have a painter strongly push one or two paints. Maybe a professional contractor can weigh in on this issue since that is only what I have heard.

Consumer Reports consistently gives Behr the very highest rating. Until recently I have been using Sherwin Williams and I have found it to be very good. Easy to apply, cleanup, and wears well.

Flat paint is fine for some applications such as ceilings but I would not recommend it for walls or other areas that would be touched by people. It seems to absorb the oils on a person's hand and does not cleanup nearly as well as an enamel. Flat paint also seems to result in cobwebs in corners of rooms since it has more of a sandpaper type surface to it. The enamels don't seem to have this problem.

I prefer a satin or eggshell finish for walls which is almost universally recommended by most people.

You will not be disappointed with either Sherwin Williams or Behr. I would make the decision based upon cost and availability.

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Old 08-21-2009, 11:32 PM  
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Kwmainer:
I think that's what happens when you put a post through an English to Chinese translation program, and then translate it back into English again. You get chop suey.

Jalexed2:

Quote:
It seems to absorb the oils on a person's hand and does not cleanup nearly as well as an enamel. Flat paint also seems to result in cobwebs in corners of rooms since it has more of a sandpaper type surface to it. The enamels don't seem to have this problem.
Actually, there really is no such thing as an enamel paint anymore, but if you had to point to a modern day "enamel", you'd point to a can of polyurethane floor paint.

You see, "enamel" paints were first made by tinting a can of varnish to the desired colour in a paint tinting machine. Years ago, varnishes only came in semi-gloss and gloss. Also, at the time, varnish was made by adding a greater amount of better quality plant resins (called "copals") to linseed oil. Copals are basically the dried sap of various plants and are similar in nature to amber. The best quality copals were those that would impart the most hardness to the linseed oil film while still imparting the least colour to it. Because varnishes needed to protect furniture, they needed to form a hard film, but it was also important to allow the beauty of the wood to be seen, so varnishes had a larger quantity of higher quality copals in them than paints did. Consequently, tinting a can of varnish on a paint tinting machine would result in a gloss or semi-gloss "paint" that dried to a harder film than you'd otherwise expect, and such "paints" were called "enamel paints". The hardness came from the additional high quality copals in the varnish, and the smoothness came from the fact that varnishes only came in semi-gloss and gloss, which meant they would dry to smoother films than most paints did.

Nowadays, polyurethane has replaced varnish as the clear coat of choice over wood. So, a modern day enamel would be what you'd get if you tinted a can of polyurethane "varnish" or polyurethane hardwood floor finish in a paint tinting machine. Such paints do exist, and they're called polyurethane floor paints and every paint store will sell them in factory pretinted colours.

However, the word "enamel" only has a well defined meaning in the field of dentistry. In the paint industry, the meaning of the word has "settled" on: "a paint that dries to a harder and smoother film than you'd otherwise expect". But, because of continuing improvements in paint binders and additives called "rheology modifiers" that affect the viscosity and self leveling properties of the paint, nowadays EVERY paint can be considered an "enamel" compared to the same paint made by the same company 15 or 20 years ago.

As a result, some companies (like Behr) have come to call just about every paint they make an "enamel". For example, the only paint that Behr makes that doesn't have the word "enamel" in it's name is their dead flat latex paints which are too soft and too rough to ever come close to qualifying as an "enamel" (except perhaps to a lawyer). In that situation, the word "enamel" on the can takes on a completely different meaning. It becomes a racing stripe to convince the uninformed consumer that Behr's paint is somehow superior to that of it's competitor's, whose labels don't identify their paints as "enamels".

You can have fun with this. Just ask the guy in the orange apron how you can be sure the paint in the Behr can is really an enamel, and not just ordinary paint. Or, ask him to explain the difference between Ralph Lauren's satin latex "paint" and Behr's satin latex "enamel". If he tries to answer any of those questions, it just shows he doesn't know what an "enamel paint" really is.
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Old 08-26-2009, 12:34 PM  
Billvila
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Anybody used the primer/paint in one yet. I'm painting my Daughters room and it seems like it would save time but not if I have to go back and redo it in a couple of years. If you used it do you have to scuff between coats?

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Old 12-26-2009, 07:11 PM  
opacho007
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Its up to you the most important is how good in the color, if it is compatible with your furniture and flooring.



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