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Old 08-04-2013, 11:32 AM  
Jmayspaint
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There is so much interesting discussion going on about the pros and cons of priming drywall, I wanted to try using one of the new latex enamel paints that does not recommend primer for drywall.

http://www.valsparpaint.com/system/g...atin_Paint.pdf


2,400 sq ft of new level 4 drywall. It was all thoroughly vacuumed and ready to paint.
I applied one coat of Valspar Ultra interior satin, sprayed and back rolled at 4-6 mil.

Some first cost pics..



image-4184837648.jpg   image-1119456428.jpg   image-2578599677.jpg  
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Old 08-04-2013, 11:45 AM  
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I was pretty happy with the coverage. Probably 80-90% covered, I could barely see the mud.

Sanding was not great. It would sand smooth, but did not powder up.

There was very little flashing in the first coat, surprisingly little actually.
Not much sheen differential between the paper and the mud.

Its too early to check adhesion, but a preliminary tape test showed poor adhesion to the mud, and strong adhesion to the paper.

On this one wall, I did not back roll the finish coat. I wanted to see how a sprayed only finish would do.



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Old 08-04-2013, 11:52 AM  
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Since I was experimenting, I decided to test some spackle too.

This is Dap Crack Shot spackle. It says on the can "will not flash paint"
This satin finish seemed like a good place to check out that claim.

Some small gouges in the drywall filled with the Dap, after the first coat and sanding. After the patches dried, I sanded them flush, and finish coated the wall (spray only, no back roll).

image-637321296.jpg   image-1678518718.jpg  
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Old 08-04-2013, 11:56 AM  
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The pictures don't look all that bad actually. I'm still old school though, and do my best to sell an actual dedicated primer to my customers. So far it hasn't been a problem selling jobs as far as I know.

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Old 08-04-2013, 12:28 PM  
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My overall impression so far is that.. Its fine..
Good coverage, even sheen. But, the poor sand ability of it wasn't conducive to getting a super smooth, even textured finish.

One thing that always bothered me about drywall primers is how dry and chalky they usually are. But I guess that's the trade off, because they sand well. With a good coat of drywall primer, you can do a lot to even out the different textures of dry wall by sanding.
That not the case as much with an acrylic film.


Im interested in how well the paint bonds to the mud when cured.
It was pointed out in another forum that some drywall primers contain things like limestone, and calcium carbonate that help to form a bond with the calcium sulfate in gypsum products (mud).

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Old 08-04-2013, 06:54 PM  
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Presumably, whatever helps primer bond to drywall compound ought to be in self-priming paint - or something like it.

Reading the tech sheet is almost too good to be true. "Thick, 1 coat coverage", self priming, even in satin....? Well, it is thick at 1.9 mils. They recommend "1-2 coats", but they really don't say when you'd need 1 and when you'd need 2.

However with your technique you're getting over 2 mil. And it sounds like you're planning on 2 coats anyway, because there is some slight flashing. Considering your spread rate, I'm not sure how Valspar thinks satin will go over drywall in 1 coat.

This is pretty impressive. So is the Crack Shot.

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Old 08-04-2013, 06:56 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schmidt & Co. View Post
I'm still old school though, and do my best to sell an actual dedicated primer to my customers. So far it hasn't been a problem selling jobs as far as I know.
For selling, I'd think primer would be the way to go. It will probably be perceived better for the foreseeable future. For profit, if you can get away with P&P on a job where primer isn't specified, it can obviously save money.
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Old 08-05-2013, 01:25 AM  
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[QUOTE=jeffnc;2853]For selling, I'd think primer would be the way to go. It will probably be perceived better for the foreseeable future. For profit, if you can get away with P&P on a job where primer isn't specified, it can obviously save money.[/QUOTE]



In your mind
and don't throw your stupid logic and numbers at us here, we have already been through it

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Old 08-05-2013, 06:09 AM  
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Quote:
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Presumably, whatever helps primer bond to drywall compound ought to be in self-priming paint - or something like it.
I wish there was a way to know.
Manufactures give us so little info about what is actually in there paint. Inert ingredients are often listed as 'trade secrets'.

This makes accurate product comparisons difficult, and leaves a lot up to conjecture.
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Old 08-05-2013, 06:16 AM  
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I know, annoying. The only thing you can tell from the data sheet is it has acrylic and titanium dioxide in it. We can assume water, and that's about it



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