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-   -   Screen Porch, Exposure to Elements, Green Wood (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f107/screen-porch-exposure-elements-green-wood-16990/)

Peter_S 08-08-2013 09:33 PM

Screen Porch, Exposure to Elements, Green Wood
 
Hello All,

We have a summer house with a screen porch that lets rain in when the windows are not covered (in the summer) and tends to accumulate some mold/mildew on the shoulder seasons before we clean it annually. To boot, it was built in the 1940's when resources were scarce and the wood was somewhat green. We haven't been able to get sap from showing up through all the floor paints we have used.

Peter_S 08-08-2013 09:36 PM

(continued)...

I am hoping someone can offer advice as to what type of paint would suit this situation best. Something that the sap will not come through (we've tried primers that claim to seal sap in without success). Something that can withstand exposure to the elements I've described above. Something that looks decent for a quasi-indoor space. I was thinking of epoxy, but am not convinced. Any advice, and rationale, would be most appreciated! Thanks, Peter

chrisn 08-09-2013 02:37 AM

2 Attachment(s)
You will need to seal the sap before anything is going to work. I would think after 70 years the sap would be dried but I am not there.
BIN

Peter_S 08-09-2013 09:50 AM

I thought we tried using something like that, without success. Has anyone else had that not work for them, or is it considered a pretty-much sure thing that it will work? It is indeed hard to believed that after 70 years we are still having issues with the sap coming through.

If there are no other alternatives, or if it is typically quite successful, we will try this.

What about epoxy paint? I'm gathering that could add problems in the long term, as once it is down, you are stuck with it.

Thanks, Peter

Jmayspaint 08-09-2013 10:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter_S (Post 2875)
I thought we tried using something like that, without success. Has anyone else had that not work for them, or is it considered a pretty-much sure thing that it will work? It is indeed hard to believed that after 70 years we are still having issues with the sap coming through.

If there are no other alternatives, or if it is typically quite successful, we will try this.

What about epoxy paint? I'm gathering that could add problems in the long term, as once it is down, you are stuck with it.

Thanks, Peter

Yes, epoxy could cause problems. Especially if there is an existing coating on the floor already. Many epoxies are 'hot' products that can attack previous coatings and cause them to lift. And in general, epoxies are difficult to re-coat once cured.

Bin is probably your best bet. I have seen Persistent sap bleed that nothing would stop.

chrisn 08-09-2013 03:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jmayspaint (Post 2876)
Yes, epoxy could cause problems. Especially if there is an existing coating on the floor already. Many epoxies are 'hot' products that can attack previous coatings and cause them to lift. And in general, epoxies are difficult to re-coat once cured.

Bin is probably your best bet. I have seen Persistent sap bleed that nothing would stop.

after 70 years?

Jmayspaint 08-09-2013 04:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 2877)

after 70 years?

Doesn't seem very likely does it.

Maybe there was some change in conditions in more recent years that somehow allowed sap that had been trapped in the wood to slowly escape.
Old houses often have porches that weren't always porches.
I worked on a remodel in an old house one time where they took the original cabinets off the wooden slat walls, and moved them. Over the corse of a few weeks, the newly exposed wood oozed little blobs of sap. It was really weird.

Must be something like that, or the op is mistaking something else for sap, which doesn't seen very likely.

Peter_S 08-10-2013 08:27 AM

Thanks All. There are bits of yellowy sticky sap, and there are rust-colored stains that coincide with the knots in the wood. Would it help to use two coats of BIN primer? Is there a different way to handle the knots which stain through? Thanks.

Jmayspaint 08-10-2013 05:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter_S (Post 2882)
Thanks All. There are bits of yellowy sticky sap, and there are rust-colored stains that coincide with the knots in the wood. Would it help to use two coats of BIN primer? Is there a different way to handle the knots which stain through? Thanks.

Bin is your best bet for stoping the knots from bleeding through as far as normal primers go. And two coats is ok.

Some stubborn knots will bleed through Bin over time though. I have used aluminum roof paint to spot prime knots that nothing else would hold as a last resort. I have never had that not work, I guess a thin layer of metal would block about any stain, but have only done it a few times in extreme cases.

Lately I have heard from other pros about using ext wood glue to spot prime bleeding knots. A lot of guys swear by it as the best method.
I will try it next time that comes up.

Peter_S 08-12-2013 12:34 PM

Awesome! Thanks a lot for the advice!


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