DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Decorating and Design > first home...wood paneling...i need help!!




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-04-2008, 11:02 AM  
guyod
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Wind Gap, PA
Posts: 423
Liked 21 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

Killz 11 only costs $13 in my area and it takes 3 coats to fully cover paneling. The guy i work for flipping houses for coats everything in killz and leaves it as a finished color. 2 coats and your paint should give a good finish. I would get a thick roller and push really hard to get in the seams. i used a brush some times but it just takes too long even just painting the seams and rolling the rest.



__________________
guyod is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-29-2009, 01:27 PM  
dgpnla
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1
Default

Would some of u be so kind as to send me photos of painted paneling (w/out grooves filled)? For some reason, I can't view any of the photos in "attachments" here. My email address is perry26@cox.net. I'm seriously considering painting my den paneling using Kilz paint. Thank you so much!



__________________
dgpnla is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-29-2009, 07:16 AM  
svey
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2
Default

In my basement, I've sanded the panel s with a random orbit sander (80 grit), washed everything down with TSP solution, rinsing well, taped all the grove with fiberglass drywall tape. I've applied joint compound with drywall knive (6 inches over the tape), after the mud dried, I've scraped the high spot. I then rolled more drywall mud on the wall (thinned to whip cream consistency), working 2 feet section, knocking down texture with wide knive. 2 coats with the roller gave me nice wall ready for primer and paint. It has been 4 years and everything is still looking ok.

__________________
svey is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-29-2009, 11:10 AM  
Christian
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 87
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dgpnla View Post
Would some of u be so kind as to send me photos of painted paneling (w/out grooves filled)? For some reason, I can't view any of the photos in "attachments" here. My email address is perry26@cox.net. I'm seriously considering painting my den paneling using Kilz paint. Thank you so much!
I don't have any pictures handy but the job is done and it looks pretty darn good for the time/money spent. I'd go for it.

If I take some pictures soon I will email them to you.
__________________
Christian is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-29-2009, 07:42 PM  
Nestor_Kelebay
Emperor Penguin
 
Nestor_Kelebay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 1,844
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

I've never used KILZ II, so I can't comment on the stuff.

However, if the objective here is to paint over glossy panelling only so that it can be stomached until it can be replaced, then I'm wondering if a better game plan wouldn't be to:

Prime it with Zinsser's Bullseye 123 latex primer, and then paint over that. Zinsser's boasts that their Bullseye 123 will stick to smooth surfaces like glazed ceramic wall tile, high gloss polyurethane, galvanized sheet metal and other smooth materials. I've never painted over a smoother surface with Bullseye 123, as I typically use it only as a primer over bare plaster or bare drywall.

However, it seems to me if we're using Liquid sandpaper to dull the gloss of the existing substrate, whether a more effective gameplan would be to use a primer that will stick well to that glossy substrate (like 123) and then topcoat over the 123.

I really don't know if this is a good idea or a bad idea. I'm just saying it makes some kinda horse sense to me.

__________________
Nestor_Kelebay is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-30-2009, 07:39 AM  
Christian
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 87
Default

The Kilz worked great.

I actually didn't sand or do hardly any prep work either. The paneling wasn't very glossy to begin with.

__________________
Christian is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-30-2009, 12:01 PM  
dakuda
Senior Member
 
dakuda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 174
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian View Post
I don't have any pictures handy but the job is done and it looks pretty darn good for the time/money spent. I'd go for it.

If I take some pictures soon I will email them to you.
I would like to see the pictures as well. Please post them in the thread.

I thought about doing that when I bought my house. I wound up tearing down the paneling and putting up new walls and patching those that I could. There was paneling in almost every room in the house.
__________________
dakuda is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-30-2009, 01:16 PM  
Christian
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 87
Default

I will take some pictures tonight and post them.

__________________
Christian is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2010, 11:51 PM  
Albert_23
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Amador City, California
Posts: 21
Default

Any updates on the photos? I'm really interested in seeing this.

__________________

Window [URL="http://www.cwproducts.com.au/Roller-Shutters.aspx?pid=7"]Roller Shutters[/URL] for a Secure Home

Albert_23 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-31-2010, 05:45 PM  
donnamabob
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Cortland, NY
Posts: 2
Default

Drywall would be ideal, but if you can't afford it then you can't afford it. My parents had a similar situation in their family room - so what they did was paint the paneling white and then "antique" it by brushing on some stain. This achieved sort of a white washed look. They then took this a step further and gave it an old farm house look by lining the corners with some old beat up wood boards that they stained to a darker finish. They even bought some raud iron (sp?) pieces to "attach" the boards to each other with. The entire project ended up costing under $200 - and now that they have the money to drywall the room, they're choosing not to because of all of the compliments they've received on the "country charm" of the home.



__________________
donnamabob is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter DIY Home Repair Forum Replies Last Post
Wood paneling TxBuilder Decorating and Design 23 11-12-2009 09:47 PM
Real wood paneling in basement Lemer Walls and Ceilings 6 11-14-2008 12:50 PM
Painting Wood Paneling Ian Decorating and Design 5 01-13-2008 09:47 PM
Home Security TxBuilder General Home Improvement Discussion 1 10-11-2006 01:30 AM