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-   Walls and Ceilings (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f109/)
-   -   ceiling cracking (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f109/ceiling-cracking-4427/)

shan2themax 06-15-2008 05:42 PM

ceiling cracking
 
2 Attachment(s)
ok guys... long time no talk... I know I said I was done but I lied.... Had to take a break for school... for the most part the kitchen is done (still have to do the upper cabinets but that will be sept, oct)

so... as this picture shows, there is a crack... while the crack doesnt look too bad in this picture.. it is getting somewhat bigger... I cant find a usb cable for a my camera and the memory card is defunct.. so, I cant show you a picture right now... but to describe it... I would say that it is 1/16 to 1/8 in wide right now with the kitchen/dining room somewhat higher than the living room... I will attatch the picture of the layout of the house also... (this is between the living room and dining/kitchen in the picture)



but since I have noticed this change... I am wondering if going forward with placing support under the house is a good idea (diy that is)... on the other hand... to have a contractor do it, I will have to wait till sept and then scratch the upper cabinets... (which is ok...) so the question is....
is this still diy doable? windows are the same as previously, doors are the same as previous.....

shan2themax 06-16-2008 10:52 AM

2 Attachment(s)
got a new memory card for the camera so here is the crack as it is today

handyguys 06-16-2008 11:13 AM

As I recall you were asking about load bearing walls in another post. Did you make any changes to wall structures? When doing that kitchen/plumbing work were any wall studs removed or any structure removed?

Maybe this just opened up due to disturbance during the kitchen work and maybe it wont open further. Can you see from above? I would be curious if the drywall is tight to the joists or if it has pulled away. If its tight to the joists then the structure moved. If the drywall is pulled away from the joists then likely just the drywall needs re-attached.

If you cant get at it from above try pushing up on the drywall and see if you can tell which it is.

shan2themax 06-16-2008 11:19 AM

when I did the kitchen I didnt redrywall or anything just painted down a little further... I didnt move anywalls... yes I had posted about load bearing walls... so that I knew where to put the support under the house... I will try to get up in the attic and see if I can see anything... but first I will try to push on the drywall and see what happens... then I will repost at some point... thanks

glennjanie 06-16-2008 02:02 PM

Hello Shan:
It appears to me that the crack is in line with the bearing wall but unsupported.
It would be possible to go into the attic and install a double 2 X 6 beam across the cracked area. Make it 6 or 8 feet long so it can rest on the bearing wall on each end of the crack. Then, the joist ends above the crack could be attached to the new beam with corner framing anchors. It may be necessary to support the area from under the ceiling to get those joists up as high as the joists on each side.
Yes, the extra shoring under the house is still a DIY worthy job. Caution, do not attempt that without a 'buddy' on the outside to hand things to you and keep an eye on you. A piece of plywood, OSB or tin with two small ropes attached is a handy method of transporting materials under the house without having to crawl out for each piece.
Glenn

shan2themax 06-16-2008 02:24 PM

in this quote from you "It would be possible to go into the attic and install a double 2 X 6 beam across the cracked area. Make it 6 or 8 feet long so it can rest on the bearing wall on each end of the crack. Then, the joist ends above the crack could be attached to the new beam with corner framing anchors. It may be necessary to support the area from under the ceiling to get those joists up as high as the joists on each side."


I am not understanding it and yes this crack is along the main wall that seperates the kitchen and living room (what we are assuming is load bearing)


in looking at the crack more closely... it looks to possibly be a seam in the drywall also.....

glennjanie 06-16-2008 07:20 PM

Hello Shan:
My point is, to make a supporting beam for the area that seems to be unsupported, without putting the beam in the living space. You will probably find 3 or more joist splices above the crack without apperant support.
Yes, a joint in the drywall makes it more subject to cracking but a crack indicates some movement in the framing. In this case I think the framing is settteling down.
Glenn


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