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mumsy613 01-22-2010 02:14 PM

temp settings on washer
 
Does anyone know of a washer (brand) that allows manual temperature control on all settings? I have had two washers that can't tell freezing cold from warm water. I prefer the old school of setting the valves myself.

If there is no longer such a thing, does anyone know how to disable the temp control system in my top load whirlpool washer?

Or....does anyone know where I might find this information?

Thanks, Fran

Wuzzat? 01-25-2010 09:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mumsy613 (Post 39396)
Does anyone know of a washer (brand) that allows manual temperature control on all settings? I have had two washers that can't tell freezing cold from warm water. I prefer the old school of setting the valves myself.

If there is no longer such a thing, does anyone know how to disable the temp control system in my top load whirlpool washer?

Or....does anyone know where I might find this information?

Thanks, Fran

To bypass the temp. control valves you need to get inside the machine.

You could set the washer controls so both hot and cold water are used, and then modulate the washer tub temperature using your faucet handle settings.
It's easier to return to the desired settings if you have valves that only turn 1/4 turn [ball valves].
http://www.plumbingsuppliesandfittings.co.uk/admin/images/8121_CompLeverBalVa191109.jpg

1 gal of 120F water and 1 gal of 50F water will give you 2 gals of (120+50)/2 = 85F water.

Nestor_Kelebay 01-25-2010 12:10 PM

Mumsy:

So far as I know, all clothes washing machines are the same in that regard. They all use something called a water inlet valve, which looks like this:

http://www.homerepairforum.com/image...valve_w550.jpg

The hot and cold water hoses connect at the locations marked "water hose connections". Each water hose connection has a solenoid that controls it.

When you select a HOT water wash, then ONLY the hot water solenoid gets electricity, allowing only hot water to flow into the washing machine. When you select a COLD water wash, then ONLY the cold water solenoid gets electricity, allowing only cold water to flow into the washing machine. When you select a WARM water wash, then BOTH the hot and cold water solenoids get electricity, allowing both hot and cold water to flow into the washing machine so that the resulting wash is in warm water.

I think you're thinking that the washing machine heats the water to the selected temperature, kinda like some dish washers do, and that isn't true. A clothes washer simply allows water from the hot water supply hose to flow into the machine, regardless of whether the water in the hot water supply piping is hot or not.

If your hot water heater is located at the opposite end of your house, and you do your laundry first thing in the morning when the water in the hot water lines is still cooled down from the night before, then you're going to get cool water flowing into the washing machine through the hot water supply hose until the water heats up.

Because of that difference in how long it takes for the water to start running hot in the hot water supply hose, AND the actual cold water temperature, you can have substantial differences in your wash temperature from summer to winter. Where I live, during the winter months, the cold water coming out the faucets during the winter will only be about 40 degrees. F., whereas during the summer, the cold water coming out of the faucets will be about 60 deg. F.

For more consistant and predictable results, run the hot water faucet at the laundry tub until the water runs not, and then start the wash cycle.

Wuzzat? 01-25-2010 03:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nestor_Kelebay (Post 39532)
For more consistant and predictable results, run the hot water faucet at the laundry tub until the water runs not, and then start the wash cycle.

Which, for 100' of 1/2" ID pipe, takes one gallon. :D

Mr. K., is this what you mean by your "New Mexico" line?
Manslaughter defense possible in abortion killing - KVIA.com El Paso, Las Cruces - Weather, News, Sports -

http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=%22new+mexico%22+defense+needed+killing&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affirmative_defense

Nestor_Kelebay 01-25-2010 04:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wuzzat? (Post 39541)
Mr. K., is this what you mean by your "New Mexico" line?

No, not at all.

That defense reported on that TV station is the best some high price Philadelphia lawyer can come up with to defend the guy that shot that abortion doctor a year or so ago. Best I can tell, that doctor was a church going man, and so that'd preclude the "needed killin" defence in that case.

My signature line applies in the case where a body is so mean spirited, sour, nasty, never up to no good and just plain ornery that the best thing to happen for all concerned is that someone just plugs him and plants him.


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