DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Flooring > Crappy Subfloor Installed in Cabin - Suggestions?




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-15-2013, 07:07 PM  
nealtw
Contractor
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: vancouver, b.c.
Posts: 9,766
Liked 802 Times on 715 Posts
Likes Given: 1362

Default

Generally you would cut 1 1/2" from the wall and replace it with matching thickness but in your case I would cut it right next to the wall with a saws-all and then add the blocking like in the link I gave you in post #6, the end wall is only sitting on one joist so only cut out a few feet at a time and add the blocks as you go so the wall dosn't sag.



__________________
nealtw is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-16-2013, 08:25 AM  
bud16415
Fixer Upper
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Erie Pa, Pa
Posts: 1,136
Liked 322 Times on 256 Posts
Likes Given: 106

Default

Have we ever figured out how thick the OSB is or what the floor joists are on center?

Was the sub floor nailed or screwed down and how close is the pattern? Glue?

What did he use for a foundation?

Being it is a cabin and from what the OP described as what he wanted to do for final floor finish I don’t think I would take it up. Working from below doing the blocking isn’t that easy depending on how much room is below. Knowing the span and center distance and joists size will let you know if you have enough support and the problems are just with the OSB. If the structure below is ok and it has enough screws in it I would add another layer after taking the shower up. I would overlap the seams and glue and screw it down.

If the structure of the joists and spacing are not strong enough maybe you can add a beam or more points for it to rest on from below.



__________________
bud16415 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-16-2013, 06:00 PM  
papakevin
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Jeffersonville, IN / Louisville, KY
Posts: 87
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

I will need to take a better look at everything the next time I'm at the cabin, but know in the original quote the guy stated he would be using 3/4" OSB. From what I've seen, It is not tongue and groove from what I can tell and doesn't have any markings or stamps on it, only green paint on the sides. (What does the green mean anyway? Was it just the manufacturers attempt to seal the edges to prevent the OSB from sucking up moisture?)

If I get out to the cabin this weekend I'll grab some photos. Here's the underside of the cabin, but it doesn't help much. There's limited space underneath and this photo was to see how the pex got attached to the existing supply line. This is a seasonal cabin and the other end of it connects to a water shutoff.



image-2049202244.jpg

__________________
papakevin is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-16-2013, 06:23 PM  
nealtw
Contractor
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: vancouver, b.c.
Posts: 9,766
Liked 802 Times on 715 Posts
Likes Given: 1362

Default

On the bottom side you will find a block of printing that will tell you what it is and how thick it is. OSB always has painted edges, blue, green, or red. The maker uses the colour to tell at a glance how thick it is but all the makers don't use the same colour code, so that won't help you. The lines on the other side are to mark out 16" or 24" on center and we mostly see that on 7/16 roofing material.
Flooring that looks like OSB and plywood has tongue and groove on the long sides and is marked this side down so you don't screw it up.
Your guy also but it down in the same direction as the floor joists which is also a big no no.
There are rules and tricks to putting a floor down so when your ready for that, we can help.

__________________
nealtw is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-02-2013, 07:37 AM  
papakevin
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Jeffersonville, IN / Louisville, KY
Posts: 87
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Apologize for the delayed response, but the wife has had a lot of doctor appointments lately, so the projects have had to wait.

Good news is I was able to get some photos of the stamp on the bottom of the subfloor and got the following: It is 23"/32" category 24" span rating single floor exposure 1. It is SFI rated. The floor joists are spaces 16" apart, so that's good.

Bad news is that the subfloor is installed wrong. It is installed parallel with the floor joists, not as it should be. That is why the floor feels like it is sticking up on the beams where they meet.

Here's a (bad) photo of the stamp on the underside of the floor. Don't know if you can make it out, but it might help.

image-881146159.jpg   image-3339739476.jpg  
__________________
papakevin is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-02-2013, 08:29 AM  
nealtw
Contractor
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: vancouver, b.c.
Posts: 9,766
Liked 802 Times on 715 Posts
Likes Given: 1362

Default

Well that is good news, I think. A few things I can see from your photos, the butt joints in this floor need solid blocking under them to make a solid joint between sheets, the tongue and groove would usually do that job. Any span longer than seven feet should have had bridging to stop the joists from warping and twisting, 2x4 blocking between the joists near the bottom of the joists can be added. Not sure why they used treated lumber for joists but the newer treatment will eat steel so the hangers and hanger nails should be hot dipped galvinized you should be able to find information on the hangers. If they are not galvinized, checking them for rust from time to time would be a good idea.
It might be a good idea to contact Adventech's support for suggestions on what best to do with the floor it self.
http://www.huberwood.com/contact-us

__________________
nealtw is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-03-2013, 12:53 PM  
papakevin
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Jeffersonville, IN / Louisville, KY
Posts: 87
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Ok, so I will add 2 by 4 bridging in between the floor joists to keep them from twisting and I will add support underneath the floor joints where there is no support. Other than power sanding the top side of the joints to level them (and guess I'll seal where I sanded with paint just for good measure), I should be good to go?

Appreciate the guidance. With the wife having a lot of hospital visits lately, I haven't had much time to work on all of my projects.

__________________
papakevin is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-09-2013, 08:54 AM  
papakevin
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Jeffersonville, IN / Louisville, KY
Posts: 87
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

As an added bonus, when I was looking underneath to look at bridging options, found this photo. Apparently since they installed the flooring wrong it didn't reach the next joist, so they had to rig it and used scrap pieces of wood to do so. Tisk, tisk.



image-3797717192.jpg  
__________________
papakevin is offline  
nealtw Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter DIY Home Repair Forum Replies Last Post
Small cabin help..? j23 Framing and Foundation 2 05-21-2013 08:24 AM
Help with old homestead Cabin gotfuel Roofing and Siding 2 01-31-2010 11:08 AM
Help with my old Homestead Cabin gotfuel Roofing and Siding 0 01-31-2010 03:42 AM
Crappy tools guyod Tools 16 04-29-2008 09:34 AM
Novice builder of Log Cabin SamtheITman Introductions 0 09-11-2006 05:01 AM