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Old 02-16-2012, 07:08 AM  
rdharbis1
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Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
Remove the lino and check for squeaks as that old floor was just nailed down, I would screw thru to the joist and add shorter screws to tighten up the 1x6.
It was asked about the lino, yes, it is glued down. Scraping is how I removed a portion of it. This will probably be the hardest part of the job unless I remove the plywood. If I remove the plywood, I'll just cut it up in sections with lino glued on!
I do not understand the part about the shorter screws. I was intending to use screws to get rid of squeaks. I am assuming that you mean to use shorter screws through the plywood to secure the planking to the plywood after the longer screws are used to secure the planking to the joists.
Did I understand someone to say go ahead and remove the plywood and tile on the planking (using the backerboard in place of the plywood). I haven't thought of that but it would be a perfect solution, I think!


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Old 02-16-2012, 08:24 AM  
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Yes you can replace the plywood with the backer board. Put it down with thinset morter and screws.



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Old 02-16-2012, 11:16 AM  
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hey RD - I just completed a similar project in a 1962 home. It's more work, but if you ever plan on selling the house, I seriously recommend pulling up the ply. Wear a mask, set a circular saw to the depth of the ply, and cut it into workable chunks, right through the lino. If the ply/lino is original, it was likely put down with nails, and will come up easily in chunks with a crowbar.

Once the ply is up, lay 1/2" hardie backer directly on the 1x6 sub floor, and tile on top of that. The transition between rooms will be almost exact, if you have 3/4" wood floors (depending on how many times they've been refinished).

Check this out for the before: http://www.drunken-diy.com/where-demo-ends-and-rebuilding-begins/
And the after: http:http://www.drunken-diy.com/how-not-to-lay-tile/

The extra few hours is totally worth not tripping every time you walk into the room.

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Old 02-16-2012, 01:18 PM  
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drunken: Looks like you've been having fun, look good.

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Old 02-16-2012, 05:11 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drunkenDIY
hey RD - I just completed a similar project in a 1962 home. It's more work, but if you ever plan on selling the house, I seriously recommend pulling up the ply. Wear a mask, set a circular saw to the depth of the ply, and cut it into workable chunks, right through the lino. If the ply/lino is original, it was likely put down with nails, and will come up easily in chunks with a crowbar.

Once the ply is up, lay 1/2" hardie backer directly on the 1x6 sub floor, and tile on top of that. The transition between rooms will be almost exact, if you have 3/4" wood floors (depending on how many times they've been refinished).

Check this out for the before: http://www.drunken-diy.com/where-demo-ends-and-rebuilding-begins/
And the after: http:http://www.drunken-diy.com/how-not-to-lay-tile/

The extra few hours is totally worth not tripping every time you walk into the room.
That's a cool blog! I just liked it on Facebook
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Old 02-16-2012, 07:32 PM  
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That would save so much trouble but morter will never work on the linoleum.
my bathroom was like that... they layed lath over the vinyl. it held up quite well, but I wouldn't recommend it, as it is a real pain in the butt scraping that off if you ever want to change it up
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Old 02-17-2012, 06:21 AM  
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Big mistake, 1 X6's and linolium should never be under a tile floor. It's going to flex, and the thin set is not going to stick to the linolium.
Less work to remove what you have down to the floor joist and use Advantec subflooring with constrution adhesive and screwed down with ceramic coated deck screws, then a layer of 3/8 subfloor rated plywood, 1/4 tile board set in thin set.
Then to have to go back and remove all that tile when it comes loose, and the grout cracks.

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Old 02-17-2012, 06:31 AM  
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http://www.johnbridge.com/
This is a web site with nothing but info about tiling.
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Old 02-17-2012, 12:15 PM  
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What Joe says is the standard but you have to be carefull here as sometimes people are causing a much greater problem here.
The problem comes at each side of the room where the non bearing walls are sitting on the floor. These walls most times do not sit on a joist and is supported by the floor boards. When these board are cut close the wall and replaced unless steps are taken to support that wall it will sag and damage the floor on both sides of the wall.

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Old 02-17-2012, 09:45 PM  
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What is missing here is nobody said anything about if your putting down tile, with the weight added you need to check the bracing under the floor. To wide of spand will bouce and stap the tile.



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