DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Flooring > Flooring - 24 OC joists




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-25-2010, 02:51 PM  
aaronled
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 6
Default Flooring - 24 OC joists

Hello all!

I am brand-spank'n new to this forum...and I have a question for any pros out there -

I bought a house a couple months ago that I would like to completely renovate. One of the first things "we" would like to do is rip up the nasty flooring and install tile and hardwood.

However - I noticed that the floor joist are 24 OC
While the home inspector said that this will be fine for any flooring I wish to put down, the skeptic side of me wants to reach out to the masses for some more input here...

The facts -
The house is 9 years old
The joist are TJI pro 150 engineered (11 7/8")
The sub is 7/8" thick (1/8" thicker than the norm - 3/4")
The span (at the longest point) is about 15'
The cross beam supports are steel

The floor certainly doesn't feel "spongy" or anything - but I'm still concerned... I used to frame houses when I was younger, and I have never installed ANY floor joist wider than 16OC.

The inspector claimed that this floor was more sturdy than a floor comprised of 2x10's 16OC - and I would be fine putting down any floor.

All that being said -
Will I run into any issues with tile and wood floor? I am looking at a ceramic tile (18x18 or 20x20 - suggestions on thickness?). The wood floors are still undecided at this point.

I am concerned that there would be some kind of sag developed over time and cause tile grout (or the tile themselves) to crack, etc. The wood floor wouldn't be as big of a concern in my mind being that the planks will run perpendicular to the joist - however, there will still be seems in between in spots (I will stagger the joints - but still)

Any advise out there? Are my concerns warranted - or am I being paranoid!?

Thanks in advance!



__________________
aaronled is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2010, 03:13 PM  
Wuzzat?
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,328
Liked 167 Times on 154 Posts
Likes Given: 94

Default

"
jjcold
04-15-2004, 04:18 PM
I can't seem to access the TJI info from their website, I can't open the PDF with my available programs. Anyway, could someone post the specs for TJI pro 150 I beam joists, 10 inch depth, set 16" OC, single story home. I'm looking for max span on these joists. My new house has too much floor bounce, and I think they made a mistake to use only one center beam that creates a span of 15'. My house was extended 2 feet on the back end, that made the span 2 feet longer, and I just know the building department wasn't presented with plans that reflect that change. Thanks.
Rich

04-15-2004, 06:29 PM
TJI Pro 150 - 9.5" depth @ 16" o.c. with L/480 deflection criteria
Max Span with 40 Live Load & 10 Dead Load - 15'-7"
jjcold
"

Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronled View Post
1 reach out to the masses
2 I am concerned that there would be some kind of sag developed over time
3 would be some kind of sag developed over time
4 am I being paranoid!?
1 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wisdom_of_Crowds

2 Probably no one publishes service lifetimes or MTBF for their products, but you might get computer projections.

3 a sag would compress cracks closed.

4 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paranoia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paranoid_personality_disorder
If you work the numbers and you are still not convinced and you have other symptoms, then yes.
But - you are in good company! The first choice for world leaders is narcissistic, followed by obsessive-compulsive, followed by paranoid [but not in an open society for this last one].


__________________

Last edited by Wuzzat?; 01-25-2010 at 03:38 PM.
Wuzzat? is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2010, 04:16 PM  
aaronled
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 6
Default

Thanks for the reply...

I have seen the span tables - and I'm within code... That's not really my worries. Being "to code" never really tells the whole story. I am concerned with how heavy tile will fair over time - and I'm reaching out to anyone that may have experience with this situation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wuzzat? View Post
"
1 The Wisdom of Crowds - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2 Probably no one publishes service lifetimes or MTBF for their products, but you might get computer projections.

3 a sag would compress cracks closed.

4 Paranoia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Paranoid personality disorder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
If you work the numbers and you are still not convinced and you have other symptoms, then yes.
But - you are in good company! The first choice for world leaders is narcissistic, followed by obsessive-compulsive, followed by paranoid [but not in an open society for this last one].
1) Thanks for pointing that out - I was worried that using the internet to collect knowledge was just a big 'ol waste of time...now I have confirmation...
2) I'm not an astrologer - but I would think that this would be a hard stat to list being that it would be hard to 'standardize' how people will treat / abuse their floors - weight of furniture / (people ) - moister - yadda yadda.
3) Could you clarify on this point? compress cracks closed? surely if a crack is present in a sag, traffic would deteriorate the tile? no?
4) ...

The reason I am trying to gather some opinions here is b/c I'm trying to determine if it's worth the time / money to add sister joists. I haven't yet finished the basement and the existing floor will soon be ripped up...so now would be the time if i were to add joists...
__________________
aaronled is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2010, 06:29 PM  
inspectorD
Housebroken
HRT_MODERATOR.png
 
inspectorD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Litchfield, CT
Posts: 4,038
Liked 120 Times on 100 Posts
Likes Given: 270

Default well

Speaking from experience, the larger the span.. the more you have to worry about...of course.
My concern would be any joints if the plywood was not toungue and groved.These will be weaker areas.
Adding another 3/4 ply on top would help, or go old school with a 1 inch mortar and mesh base on top of the existing ply.

And I would not remove the plywood you have, if it is glued down, you will ruin the TJI flange...just in case you were thinkin of that route.


Just when we need Mr. Cline, he pulls an invisible man.

__________________

Just My
Made in the

inspectorD is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2010, 07:08 PM  
Wuzzat?
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,328
Liked 167 Times on 154 Posts
Likes Given: 94

Default

TJI Floor Joists Span Table)

It's OK for a 40/10 PSF live/dead load @ L/360 and L/480 but not for a 40/20 PSF live/dead load.

As to the strength of 2x10's @ 16 OC this paper gives you the spans
http://www.awc.org/pdf/STJR_2005.pdf

Use 1.9 as E for douglas fir in Table F-2.
I get a 17'-4" span for a 40/10 PSF live/dead load @ L/360, so the 2x10's are stronger.
__________________

Last edited by Wuzzat?; 01-25-2010 at 07:39 PM.
Wuzzat? is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2010, 10:09 AM  
Bud Cline
Tile Contractor
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 284
Default

aaronled,

Your structure as it is is fine for the minimum overall deflection required for ceramic tile of 1/360.

Your problem with this system is going to be "deflection between the floor joists". This is ALWAYS the issue with floor joists 24" o.c.

The solution is somewhat simple however. The Tile Council of North America recommends: A double plywood floor is required using exterior grade plywood. The face grain of the plywood should run perpendicular to the floor joists for maximum stiffness. Fastened with screws spaced six inches in the field and four inches around the perimeter of each board.


Your inspector is dead-wrong and obviously has no knowledge of what is required for a tile floor. You were very wise to question his claims.

__________________

[SIZE="1"][B][COLOR="Blue"][CENTER]Some days I aspire to becoming a missing person.[/CENTER][/COLOR][/B][/SIZE]

Bud Cline is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2010, 07:39 PM  
aaronled
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 6
Default

Thanks for the input!

I have been back and forth over this for a while now.

I'm truly contemplating adding in joist to be 12OC... I know this is a big job - BUT, the basement is not finished and I will be ripping up the existing floor anyway - SO if I were to ever do this, now would be the time.

If I do this, I'm not so much worried about re-running the electrical (and all the plumbing perpendicular to the joist are ran underneath the joist instead of through - the duct-work doesn't appear that threatening either) - however, I would like to add them in without ripping up the sub floor...

I don't know if this is wise (to beat them into place - and somehow glue them) - but like inspectorD pointed out, I will be contending with a glued flange on the existing joist, and I would prefer to leave them be. You guys think this is a dumb approach?

One more Q (for Bud Cline - if he stops back by ) - If I were to leave as-is, would this "deflection between the floor joists" still be a concern being that the sub floor is 7/8 tongue and groove?

Again, guys, much appreciated!

__________________
aaronled is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2010, 07:47 PM  
Wuzzat?
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,328
Liked 167 Times on 154 Posts
Likes Given: 94

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronled View Post
would this "deflection between the floor joists" still be a concern being that the sub floor is 7/8 tongue and groove?
So the "beam span" is 2' and the beam "height" is 7/8"; what type of wood is it?

A beam in bending has the top surface in compression, so cracks above a curved beam would be compressed close. The bottom is in tension so this surface is stretched and lengthened.
__________________

Last edited by Wuzzat?; 01-27-2010 at 07:55 PM.
Wuzzat? is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2010, 08:31 PM  
aaronled
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 6
Default

Sorry, Wuzzat - I'm not understanding your question...

The joists are 24OC
The span (at the widest point of the house) is 15'
the beams are steel (don't know the height dimensions - but they certainly are beefy enough for the cross run)
7/8" is the thickness of the sub-floor (tongue and groove...plywood)

Not sure where the "curved beam" is coming into play here...

From my experience with tile - a crack in a sagging point will only get worse with time.

Sorry if I'm not understanding you right...little lost

__________________
aaronled is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-28-2010, 07:23 AM  
Wuzzat?
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,328
Liked 167 Times on 154 Posts
Likes Given: 94

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronled View Post
Sorry, Wuzzat - I'm not understanding your question...

The joists are 24OC
The span (at the widest point of the house) is 15'
the beams are steel (don't know the height dimensions - but they certainly are beefy enough for the cross run)
7/8" is the thickness of the sub-floor (tongue and groove...plywood)

Not sure where the "curved beam" is coming into play here...

From my experience with tile - a crack in a sagging point will only get worse with time.

Sorry if I'm not understanding you right...little lost
Sorry: 'beam' should have been 'joist'.

With a load on it, the subfloor will sag between the 24" joists, in addition to the 15' joist sagging over its span.
To calc. the small deflection you will have over 24" you need to know the modulus of elasticity, E or MOE, of the wood. For Select Structural, SS, larch it's ~1.9 million PSI.

According to table F-1 in this link
http://www.awc.org/pdf/STJR_2005.pdf
E ranges from 0.8 to 2.4 million PSI for lumber used in structures.

Here's a microscopic look at beams/joists in bending
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutral_axis


__________________

Last edited by Wuzzat?; 01-28-2010 at 02:41 PM.
Wuzzat? is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter DIY Home Repair Forum Replies Last Post
not enough floor joists shedee Framing and Foundation 2 08-16-2013 04:32 PM
Finding Ceiling Joists? yodelking591 General Home Improvement Discussion 4 07-31-2008 06:30 PM
Strengthening joists spooksmcgee Flooring 6 05-25-2008 01:49 PM
Supporting floor joists shan2themax Flooring 3 08-14-2007 05:03 PM
Odd stuff on floor joists WestBentley Framing and Foundation 3 02-25-2007 12:00 PM