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hrpfwass 04-10-2008 04:18 AM

sheetrock installation
 
I have a room with high cathedral ceilings and two rows of windows. There is currently tongue in groove pine strips about three quarter inch thick on walls. i want to sheetrock over this material without ripping it out. My problem is the moulding around each of 20 windows that are recessed. Can I install sheetrock over pine strips and abutting against moulding? If I do the moulding will still protrude approx one eighth inch beyond the sheetrock. If the sheetrock is installed so that the straight edge abuts the moulding with perhaps a bead of thin caulk on top (against the moulding) can I get a finished product that looks decent?:confused:

glennjanie 04-10-2008 10:50 AM

Welcome hrptwass:
Yes, that will make an excellent finish which will remain flexible over the years.
Glenn

handyguys 04-10-2008 11:03 AM

I'm not sure I would do it as you are proposing. maybe I'm not picturing it correctly.

I would remove the window trim, instal the sheetrock and then install jamb extensions to bring the window jamb out flush with the sheetrock and then re-install the trim. If you remove the wood wall you will likely need to remove the current jamb extensions and re-install shorter ones. Either way you are doing new jamb extensions.

I would go ahead and remove the wood walls. This will give you the opportunity to add new outlets and insulate is necessary.

guyod 04-10-2008 01:18 PM

You also might find plaster or sheet rock behind the T&G. Ever consider renting a paint sprayer and painting the T@G. I think its worth A couple hundred bucks and a days works to see how it would look. it could save you thousands and weeks.
I dont think flush trim would look right.. If you do go that way you can get 1/4 drywall but for some reason its more expensive that 1/2 and only comes in 4x8

ToolGuy 04-10-2008 04:24 PM

I'm with handyguys and guyod on this one, don't bury the trim. Removing the trim and extending the jambs is the right way to do it, and is not very difficult. Just rip some strips the same thickness of the drywall, glue and tack them in, and reinstall the trim.

Baseboard too... Remove it, run the drywall behind it, reinstall it. You'll have to cut it a little shorter to fit, but that's not a big deal.

If you're gonna do it, do it right. :)

crewguy 04-11-2008 07:35 PM

Consider this;
Drywall comes in 4 thicknesses: 1/4", 1/2", 3/8", 5/8"

If I were you, I would have 1/4" drywall screwed over the T&G. Dependant of the ceiling height, you might not even notice the lack of a substantial " gap" between the wood trim and drywall. Since you have a great backing in the T&G ceiling, nobody could ever look up there and tell the difference between 1/4 and 5/8 drywall. I can guarantee that!


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