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Old 07-18-2014, 09:17 PM  
tk3000
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Default Small Kitchen Floor Issues

Hello Folks,

I have a house built in the 50s whose kitchen has sustained some water damage with water trapped inside the subfloor, etc. After sometime and effort the plumbing issues was solved, but in some instances I ended up prying up and pulling out some of the wood planks (I know it does not look like plywood, so I assuming they are wood planks, see pics) of the subfloor (or maybe underlayment; not sure what they used as underlayment back in the 50s) creating an uneven surface, but the subfloor itself seems to be solid and in good shape. Is there a straightforward way to even out the surface?



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Old 07-18-2014, 09:45 PM  
CallMeVilla
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You are right ... looks like plywood to me. I would lay down 1/4" Hardie-Board in a bed of thinset to stabilize the floor. Ordinarily, you don't need thinset because you are using an ample supply of screws. Either way could work, depending on how wavy your floor is.

Here is a basic video to help you.



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Old 07-19-2014, 01:13 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CallMeVilla View Post
You are right ... looks like plywood to me. I would lay down 1/4" Hardie-Board in a bed of thinset to stabilize the floor. Ordinarily, you don't need thinset because you are using an ample supply of screws. Either way could work, depending on how wavy your floor is.

Here is a basic video to help you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zSHQdy8MVM
Thanks for the response. The wood subfloor has missing parts (it has been delaminated), and thus I would like to fill it in with some material to even it out (at first I considered wood shims, but that would too much work and prone to imperfection). Would thinset be work well with wood when the wood expands and compress?

Would it be ok to install the backer board on the easily accessible floor only, and not having to remove the kitchen cabinetry to install backer board under them as well (too much work I would imagine).
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Old 07-19-2014, 04:34 PM  
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Depending on how much is missing, you might consider cutting out a larger piece and replacing the bad area. Just cut to the middle of the floor joist so you can re-screw the new piece to solid framing.

After fixing the bad pockets, I would still stabilize with Hardie Board because it will act as an integrated system, locking the floor into a strong, single plane ... then you can use any finish flooring afterwards with great confidence.

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Old 07-20-2014, 09:09 AM  
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Quote:
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Would it be ok to install the backer board on the easily accessible floor only, and not having to remove the kitchen cabinetry to install backer board under them as well (too much work I would imagine).


If the floor under them is ok, you can tile up to them. That's the way it's done all the time on floor replacement.
You may want to pull out the appliances to tile under them but be sure you have enough space over the top of them to reinstall. Usually that's an issue for the dishwasher and sometimes the refrigerator, if it has a cabinet over it, when you add an inch or so of new flooring.
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Old 07-20-2014, 09:18 AM  
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GOOD POINT, Beach ... People screw up on dishwashers all the time. Either they leave them in place and tile them in like King Tutt ... or they pull them out, tile underneath and discover they don't have enough height to put them back into the cabinet!

Check your appliance heights! I prefer tiling under all appliance locations. The little bit of extra effort is well worth it.

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Old 07-21-2014, 02:06 PM  
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Awesome, I will make sure I do not do the dish washer spot. I bought some utility shims (larger ones) to fill in the spots with missing wood, and since I don not expect it to be perfect I would use thinset to make it more even. Once I screw the shims in, and apply a layer of thing set on the wood subfloor, the next step would be to lay down the backer boards to make it ready to install ceramic tiles.

I am planing on using thinset with latex given that it is a wood subfloor. Wouldn't the thinset fill the grooves on the wood subfloor and thus make it difficult to expand and contract. Should the wood shims be somewhat spaced as well to allow for expansion and contraction?

Thanks!

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Old 07-21-2014, 07:37 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CallMeVilla View Post
You are right ... looks like plywood to me. I would lay down 1/4" Hardie-Board in a bed of thinset to stabilize the floor. Ordinarily, you don't need thinset because you are using an ample supply of screws. Either way could work, depending on how wavy your floor is.

Here is a basic video to help you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zSHQdy8MVM
Sorry, but you always need thinset under the CBU.
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Old 07-21-2014, 08:05 PM  
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This floor should be checked, floor joist length , size and spacing, just to make sure you are not aiming for dissapointment.

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Old 07-21-2014, 09:29 PM  
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This floor should be checked, floor joist length , size and spacing, just to make sure you are not aiming for dissapointment.
There are some very large nails which I assume are nailed to the floor joists, so I would follow the pattern. But I can go down to the Hells Tunnel (craw space) and double check on that, actually I will do that as I screw everything to see if the nails are coming out of the subfloor or going into the joists


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