DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum

DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Bricks, Masonry and Concrete (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f17/)
-   -   concrete driveway (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f17/concrete-driveway-12905/)

captflx 01-07-2012 05:30 PM

concrete driveway
 
When I moved into my older home 12 years ago, the driveway was about 4 years old and in very good condition. We are on the expandinging and contracting black soil. 12 years later the drivewway(10' x 140') is in at least 25 pieces.
I will soon consider having the concrete removed and rebuild the driveway.

Anyone have experience on what type of base ( material and thickness) might provide yeras of a good driveway on this black prairie soil?

BridgeMan 01-08-2012 07:25 PM

The term "black soil" indicates you have a lot of organics in your dirt--great for growing things (including concrete cracks!), but not the best material to be placing concrete on, even with a compacted base course between it and the concrete. You would do well to remove as much black dirt as possible, and replace it with a gravel/sand mixture. Should you choose not to do that, then at least consider placing a 6" layer of well-compacted gravel, with the rock having some (50% +/-) fractured faces. And it wouldn't hurt to reinforce the slab with some heavy mesh, which will keep things tied together even if it should crack. No thinner than 4" for the concrete thickness, and 5" or even 6" would be better. If it were mine, there'd be deep control joints transversely every 10', and maybe even a longitudinal one, full-length down the middle.

inspectorD 01-09-2012 05:56 AM

Yup
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by BridgeMan (Post 66060)
The term "black soil" indicates you have a lot of organics in your dirt--great for growing things (including concrete cracks!), but not the best material to be placing concrete on, even with a compacted base course between it and the concrete. You would do well to remove as much black dirt as possible, and replace it with a gravel/sand mixture. Should you choose not to do that, then at least consider placing a 6" layer of well-compacted gravel, with the rock having some (50% +/-) fractured faces. And it wouldn't hurt to reinforce the slab with some heavy mesh, which will keep things tied together even if it should crack. No thinner than 4" for the concrete thickness, and 5" or even 6" would be better. If it were mine, there'd be deep control joints transversely every 10', and maybe even a longitudinal one, full-length down the middle.

You won't get better advice than this, it's all about the base it sits on.
Great recommendations Bridgeman.:trophy:

EZHangDoor 01-10-2012 09:58 AM

What soil is under the black soil? I would assume some sort of heavy or clay mixture. The key as mentioned is to get the base correct. Something that allows drainage and will not collect moisture and freeze (if you live in a cold climate). Once you remove the soil, it will do NO good unless you get it compacted properly.

captflx 01-10-2012 06:18 PM

concrete driveway
 
Thanks to all with the advice. Judging from the movement, there may not be any mesh wire in the slabs. There are expansion joints about every 10-12 ft across the driveway.
Thanks again.

joecaption 01-13-2012 04:33 PM

And to do all this correctly is really not a diy job.
Your not going to have the tools, equipment, and know how to do it.
It's going to be a once shot deal, the right amount of concrete needs to be ordered to the right mix, and once that truck shows up everything better be ready or he's going to dump it anyway.

EZHangDoor 01-15-2012 08:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 66306)
And to do all this correctly is really not a diy job.
Your not going to have the tools, equipment, and know how to do it.
It's going to be a once shot deal, the right amount of concrete needs to be ordered to the right mix, and once that truck shows up everything better be ready or he's going to dump it anyway.

Your right, pouring a driveway should not be a first time DIY project. It's much harder work than it appears.

californiaremodeling 03-23-2012 01:09 AM

California Remodeling, Inc
 
Hi, if you need help please contact us at www.californiaremodelinginc.com


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:58 AM.