DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Bricks, Masonry and Concrete > Crumbling brick wall




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Old 07-17-2012, 01:40 PM  
nealtw
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My first thought was to remove it and redo it correctly. I was hoping someone could come up with a plan to support it and get the water out from behind it and not set it back on the driveway deck. Hopefully some better ideas will come along.



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Old 07-17-2012, 03:08 PM  
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Quite a common problem with some types of bricks. Nowadays we have to use frost resistant bricks up to the damp proof course, which is at least 6 inches above ground level.
http://www.brick.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Frost-Resistance-of-Clay-Bricks.pdf
If replacing the bricks I would use 2 courses of these and a piece of DPC above to stop any damp wicking up.



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Old 07-17-2012, 03:41 PM  
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Well, Mike . . . you might have to get some help. The damaged brick has to be removed up to a point where you have solid material. (Make both sides of the garage the same ehight for aesthetic reasons) You should have flashing on the wall behind the new brick. Use galvanized flashing and nail or screws.

The form for a collar can be made of 2x6 material (minimum) or 1" plywood if you go higher than 6" . . . Since you have a small area, I'm not worried about blowing out your form. Tieing the collar into the garage IS important so it doesn't fall off, of course. Bridgeman says slope the top and he is very right . . . you want rain water to rolloff the ledge.

Get a handyman to help you with this . . . it is NOT a 1st timer project.

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Old 07-17-2012, 05:15 PM  
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Wow- this site is great!! I can't believe how quick and helpful the feed back is!!

Before I posted I did do some research and thought that water was the culprit. I should have mentioned(sorry) that the driveway does slope away from the garage, but (can't really see in the pics) before this slope, it slopes slightly back into these two areas- should that be addressed somehow first? Also when discussing the overall problem with the homeowner- she stated that she would be happy with just some kind of panel (flashing) like the two squares at the corners
Of the door. I thought this would be possible, but thought that I would have to seal the bottom layer of bricks to avoid further crumbling.- does this sound like a viable option?

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Old 07-17-2012, 06:03 PM  
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Does the house have a simular look?

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Old 07-18-2012, 01:01 AM  
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Concrete collars still get my vote for the most practical (but quite aesthetic) solution to the problem. Particularly since you mentioned the reverse pitch on the driveway, which will continue to funnel melting snow/road salt grime up against whatever is located at grade level. Properly-built concrete collars (using air-entrained concrete), and sealed with a quality concrete sealer, will minimize the likelihood of any future damage. Weep holes can be installed in brick mortar joints above new flashing, to help nealtw sleep at night. Making the collars at least 4" thick, and at least 4 courses high, will provide the best barrier against future damage. If it were mine, I'd use form liners to depict fractured stone faces to really dress things up and make it look like original construction.

This is not a job for someone who's never formed/poured concrete before, so be advised in advance. Would be a piece of cake for an experienced concrete person, as well as a skilled amateur like myself.

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Old 07-18-2012, 06:17 AM  
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This is a common issue up here. The brick is a facade and not at all structural to the building, just itself attached to a wall.
Looks like the brick is absorbing plenty of water since it was installed on the driveway. Installing anything on the driveway to hold this up, is going to result in damage as the driveway moves and is in no way structural.
The best way for this little job in my Opinion?

Remove the damaged 2 courses at the bottom. My best guess is the mortar from the bricks is attached to the concrete foundation behind it, and there is no flashing or weep screed for drainage.
Install a peice of angle iron under the brick for support, and build a box from some vinyl boards with some pressure treated to attach to the building underneath it. If it gets wet, no big deal, and it can move with the freeze thaw of the ground without cracking again because it is able to flex.

Good luck.

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Old 07-18-2012, 07:09 AM  
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Thanks for everyone's help!! I'll discus the options with the homeowner and see what route she wants to take...

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Old 07-18-2012, 08:34 AM  
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Another optional idea from InspectorD . . . However, would angle iron be prone to rust? Wouldn't aluminum or galvanized be more weather resistant? Just askin'

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Old 07-18-2012, 04:41 PM  
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Aluminium has a bad time with concrete. Concrete and steel contract and expand at the same rate or close to it.
http://www.concreteconstruction.net/concrete-articles/the-aluminum-and-concrete-controversy.aspx



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