DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Bricks, Masonry and Concrete > Driveway Resurfacing




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-15-2011, 07:30 PM  
junkyarddog
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: West Bend, Wi
Posts: 1
Default Driveway

To fix the problem for good, tear out and repour.



__________________
junkyarddog is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-16-2011, 09:46 AM  
HauteShots
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Posts: 36
Default

I had about 10 different contractors come in and look and estimate and to do the job correctly it has to be grinded off and repoured. Since the skim coat is made to stick good to the base below it will most likely be damaged. This doesnt mean that we need to repoor the entire driveway we can just repour the skim coat. However, I think that the solution I'm leaning towards is epoxy mixed with pebble stone which looks like this:



It has to resealed every 3 years but I like it better then the refaced concrete. I have always decided to go after the previous home owner and possible the title company for failing to disclose the pending violations during closing. It can easily be argued that I might not have purchased the property or I would have degotiated a lower price for the home if I was aware that the driveway had to be fixed in order to satisfy the HOA.

I will keep you updated!

Joe



__________________

Joey Vegas

HauteShots is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-16-2011, 10:16 AM  
TheMcs
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Broken Arrow, OK
Posts: 12
Default

Your overlay is cracking (obviously) and failing.

I don't like acid stain on concrete, it requires resealing on a regular basis (which wasn't done to yours, or it wouldn't be faded) and the sealing makes it slick. If you remove the overlay and try to stain the actual pad, you'd better know the composition of the concrete or you might get some chemical reaction surprises (fly ash will turn any color black, etc.).

If you do go with another overlay, make sure they remove the old one first. Then do as suggested above and go with a dyed concrete (color mixed into the concrete mix). The color is throughout, so gouges and wear won't affect it. You shouldn't have to seal it either. You can have it trowelled smooth or have a stamp pattern done.

Epoxy stone overlay is hardy stuff, this I have 17 years experience with. I love the product and it will withstand driveway use, but you'd better stay on top of the maintenance. It will have to be powerwashed and resealed (another epoxy coating) every 2-5 years depending on wear. Around here install (not including removal of your overlay, which is necessary) runs about $4.50sf, resealing is $0.60sf and powerwashing is extra.

Straight epoxy coating is good as long as it's given some texture. If not it will be slick as snot. Again, you'll have to remove the overlay. Some serious cleaning/degreasing of the base slab will have to be done to prep.

Best of luck in choosing your solution.

__________________
TheMcs is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-16-2011, 10:18 AM  
TheMcs
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Broken Arrow, OK
Posts: 12
Default

Looks like we posted at the same time. Let me know if you have an questions on the spoxy stone, as I said I've got a lot of experience with it. I quit installing it a few years ago but still have some maintenance accounts. We also used to manufacture the epoxy and sell it worldwide, let me know if you need an installation reference.

__________________
TheMcs is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-16-2011, 10:49 AM  
HauteShots
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Posts: 36
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMcs View Post
Your overlay is cracking (obviously) and failing.

Epoxy stone overlay is hardy stuff, this I have 17 years experience with. I love the product and it will withstand driveway use, but you'd better stay on top of the maintenance. It will have to be powerwashed and resealed (another epoxy coating) every 2-5 years depending on wear. Around here install (not including removal of your overlay, which is necessary) runs about $4.50sf, resealing is $0.60sf and powerwashing is extra.
I understand the pebble stone coating needs maintenance every few years but if we removed the skim coat and repoured a new layer would this not also need maintenance as well? Hence, it was not maintained before I purchased the house and possible the reason that it is in such bad shape having only been refaced 4 years ago...
__________________

Joey Vegas

HauteShots is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-16-2011, 11:11 AM  
TheMcs
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Broken Arrow, OK
Posts: 12
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HauteShots View Post
if we removed the skim coat and repoured a new layer would this not also need maintenance as well? Hence, it was not maintained before I purchased the house and possible the reason that it is in such bad shape having only been refaced 4 years ago...


If I am seeing this right, #1 is your overlay and #2 is your actual driveway.
Remove the overlay completely, then thoroughly clean the driveway. The epoxy stone does not need any additional overlay, other than itself. (there is no other overlay maintenance)

The pebble stone is mixed with the epoxy resin, then poured onto the driveway (we did 35sf at a time) and hand trowelled. The excess epoxy in the mixture migrates to the driveway surface and forms the bond. Some installers prefer to also roll on a coat of epoxy prior to pouring the mixture, but I've found this messy and unnecessary.

The epoxy needs a temp of about 60F in order to be workable and allow it to migrate to the driveway surface. In colder weather we're able to manipulate this a bit by heating the epoxy, but that can only overcome so much. I'd advise against installation in temps below 45F and that's pushing it. Doing otherwise and you'll see the epoxy stone delaminate and fail.

To get a leg up on maintenance, I'd advise your first reseal after year one. It's not necessary but the best long term success I've seen was done this way. Powerwash (lightly, my 3800psi can remove stone when right up on it) and roll a mixture of the same epoxy over the clean and dry surface. After that you've likely got another 4-5 years before it needs any more. Keep up on powerwashing, once a year is fine, to avoid accumulation in the areas between the pebbles.

You can reseal yourself, it's not hard, but does take some finesse. You'll have a limited amount of work time with the epoxy. Straight epoxy (not mixed with rock) can set up in about 15 minutes on a hot day (90F+) whereas you've got about 30 minutes when it's in the 70s. It might be worth it to hire this out to the installers the first time, just watch and learn. You can buy the epoxy from them the next time. DO NOT buy any of the reseal junk at a box store or paint store, it is not intended for epoxy stone regardless of what the label says.

How long is your HOA giving you to get this done? Late March is usually the soonest I've been able to begin installations, other than the occasional fluke warm day (I did one on Jan 3rd one year).
__________________
TheMcs is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-16-2011, 11:19 AM  
TheMcs
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Broken Arrow, OK
Posts: 12
Default

Just thought of a couple more things to help out;

If you're driveway underneath moves (cracks), the epoxy stone will crack with it given enough movement. From what I can see this shouldn't be a concern since all you have are stress cracks in the overlay. If it does crack, it's repairable. The crack is chiseled out, new epoxy stone patched in. Depending on the age of the original epoxy stone, it may take time to blend in (think new picket in an old fence).

The edges along your yard normally see the most wear. Since you've got gravel and not grass you don't have to worry about edgers, but it is still the weak spot. We've overcome this by using the thin metal garden edging. Installed along the edges first, higher than the drive, it provides a form for the installation as well as a permanent edge guard.

I'm sure more will cross my mind, and feel free to ask any questions. It's off season here now so I've got my winter brain clicked on. Might take me a bit to think of everything.

__________________
TheMcs is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-16-2011, 01:36 PM  
mudmixer
Contractor
 
mudmixer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 590
Liked 44 Times on 36 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

Your driveway has already failed and temporary patches may look good in show-room ads, but they will not last because they are applied over a poor, failed surface that will cause very early failure of the surface band-aid. That concrete probably was patched and cover enough to make it last longer than it would in more severe climates.

Tear it out, compact or replace the base and then pour a new slab. In most areas a good concrete supplier can supply a standard mix on call (often called a McDonalds mix) since the materials are readily available that is very durable and works for many applications. - Not too coarse, but some good local color hues.

__________________
mudmixer is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-17-2011, 09:33 AM  
TheMcs
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Broken Arrow, OK
Posts: 12
Default

From what I can tell in the pictures, only the current overlay has failed, not the driveway itself. Given that only the overlay needs to be removed at which time the driveway can be assessed. Another overlay on a sound driveway would be just fine given sufficient prep.

If I'm wrong then I agree with mudmixer.

__________________
TheMcs is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-11-2011, 09:52 AM  
Jamie_ada
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Gold Coast, Qld
Posts: 2
Default

You could try to remove the overlay by putting saw cuts in it and then jackhammering it off this will damage the existing slab though you can have it resurfaced with a stencil spray - on which would only need resealed once every few years dont know what the price in the usa is, in australia its about $40sqm for basic pattern on decent slab to work with
Decorative Concrete Resurafacing Gold Coast Brisbane



__________________
Jamie_ada is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter DIY Home Repair Forum Replies Last Post
Concrete Sidewalk Leveling / Resurfacing? Alyx Bricks, Masonry and Concrete 10 06-27-2010 05:12 AM
Resurfacing stair treads now covered with carpet. What options are available? ranpan2009 Flooring 2 02-02-2010 08:44 PM
Garage Floor resurfacing options grins Bricks, Masonry and Concrete 2 11-19-2009 05:55 AM
Resurfacing Concrete/cinder block walls kayokayo Flooring 4 04-11-2008 11:16 PM
question on resurfacing brick basement walls barleypopmaker Bricks, Masonry and Concrete 6 01-02-2008 05:15 PM