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Old 10-08-2012, 09:37 PM  
condoowner
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Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
The area behind should have been drywalled, all of it. so close that up before building your new box.
On the last picture you see a drywall section laying against the wall on the right end of the photo.. that chunk goes where you see the pink insulation around the chimney.

I reinstalled it. All that is left now are small gaps where you see the insulation
I can post a pic tomorrow.


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Old 10-08-2012, 11:44 PM  
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If you have heat in the floor I would think twice about drilling into the concrete, just becuase the last guy got a way with it,.



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Old 10-09-2012, 12:30 AM  
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Yes, condo-guy, that "void" is the floor joist space . . . if you had gotten lucky, you might have hit a joist on edge for a solid hold-down. No big. Just glue and screw but do not over-drive.

You're doing great . . . steady, careful, informed, asking when not sure. EXCELLENT.

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Old 10-09-2012, 04:41 AM  
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If you have heat in the floor I would think twice about drilling into the concrete, just becuase the last guy got a way with it,.
We dont have heated floors.. i wish but were not that rich !!

Probably is a floor joist. I have taken every precautions to see whst csme out of the hole. Except concrete dust nothing else, no wood chips no steel particles ...

Anyways the sole plates are installed. I glued them with PL Premium construction glue and tightened the blue screws to a snug but not until i sstrip the concrete...

I cant move these plates once the glue has dried.. i would need a sledgehammer or a prybar to remove them.

Time will tell but im comfident there is no damage to the floor...
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Old 10-10-2012, 07:37 PM  
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So the steel frame is built! See the pics. Looks nice for my first framing job..

Then next week will be installing the concrete panels (backer board) and prepare for the stone job.... I am still searching for a style and finishing.. I mean molding around the fireplace opening and the top of the box... At least the box will be built and ready for the cosmetics..

One question for now: There were 2 triangular steel brackets with teeth that were bolted on the fireplace. I looked in the assembly and instruction manual, no reference to them but they are drawn on every picture. I think they are safety "stoppers" so people installing the fireplace dont stack-up wood or drywall too close to the fireplace top.

Am I right? I am asking because I had to remove them to install the top frame member. I can rebolt them but not in the same holes. Will there be carbon monoxide coming out of the holes if I leave them open??

img_0690.jpg   img_0692.jpg   img_0693.jpg  
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Old 10-10-2012, 08:17 PM  
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They were there for those of us that build with wood, so we don't apply wood any closer to the top of the firepbox. I would leave them right where you have them in the photo for the next guy to ask question. You should have finished the drywall where it is missing, it is a code thing as well as a safety thing. Especially important in a multi- family building

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Old 10-10-2012, 08:35 PM  
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You should have finished the drywall where it is missing, it is a code thing as well as a safety thing. Especially important in a multi- family building
There is an opening of about the width of the vertical members laying against the wall for them to be screwed to the wall studs, and about 6" wide band not covered at the top. The drywall is exactly like it was built by the contractor in 2005. I can try to insert a drywall piece behind the top horizontal steel member that is against the wall, if its a code issue.

If not, then what else can I do?
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Old 10-10-2012, 10:05 PM  
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Ya, it really needs to be fire stopped everytime it goes thru wall or ceiling.
I found you a manual so you can be your own expert on these things.
http://www.regency-fire.com/Files/Manuals/P90-918-525.aspx

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Old 10-11-2012, 11:16 AM  
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Nicely done Neal . . . pages 11 and 12 are particularly important. Hitting your LIKE button!

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Old 10-11-2012, 11:42 AM  
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Yeah the PDF was interesting. Thanks for the info. I wish my fireplace's manual was that detailled...

I will install a firewall behind the fireplace so no chances of fire happens. After, all safety first!

The pages 11 & 12 clearly explains the standoff requirements and the clearances that have to be maintained. Since I am using steel studs and the finished product will be 100% non-combustible, the requirements are less stringent.

All I need to fix is the back wall and I should be in good shape. What worries me is the other condos... They are all built the same.

When people renovate these things, do they usually get them inspected by a fire dept or inspector? If so I should make arrangements ASAP..



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