DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Bricks, Masonry and Concrete > keep wood post from sticking to concrete ?





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Old 07-23-2012, 08:55 AM  
carljobs
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Default I had similar situation

I had a similar situation with a mailbox. Somebody came down my street and hit all the mailboxes as they drove along with a baseball bat knocking them over. One of my neighbors found a product that has a piece of PVC that sits in concrete and the wood fits into the PVC. It's water tight so nothing gets in to rot the post. The post can be removed but the vinyl protector stays put. It remains in the concrete and the post slips in and out in case it has to be replaced. It's been great. You might want to consider digging your hole deeper than 24 inches for such a high post especially if you are putting a basketball hoop at the top. The thing we got is called Superpost.



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Old 07-23-2012, 06:15 PM  
Do_it_yourselfer
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Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
The abs pipe is the way to go.
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Originally Posted by BridgeMan View Post
A big disadvantage of using round pipe or tube is that unless a locking mechanism is incorporated into the system, the post and backboard will have a tendency to spin when the latter is hit hard and off-center by a basketball.

A better way to go is to use a short piece of tubular steel, with a small flat steel plate tack-welded on the bottom end. A chunk of TS 4 x 4 x 3/16 will have an inside clear dimension of 3-5/8", which should enable a standard 4 x 4 treated post (usually 3-1/2" square) to slide in and out at will, but still be firm enough to have very little wobble. You may have to trim the corners of the 4 x 4 a bit to match the inside corner radius of the tubular steel. Spray-painting the inside of the steel tube will minimize its tendency to rust. Don't paint the outside or the bottom plate, as you want your concrete to stick to them
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Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
Wood that is tight fit in a hole will swell with moisture and become near imposible to remove. Unprotected steel exposed to water air and concrete will rust and expand and break the concrete. That is why rebar is not to be within two inches of the surface of the concrete.
http://www.removablepost.com/
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Originally Posted by BridgeMan View Post
If nealtw's wood swells too much with moisture absorption (although allowing a 1/8" clearance has never been a "tight fit" in most parts of the world), one could always cut down and encase the wood with a steel sleeve that wouldn't appreciably change dimensions with moisture changes.

And yes, if one is truly concerned with embedded steel corroding over time due to excessive moisture intrusion, maybe all of the world's thousands of bridge foundations supported by bare steel piling embedded in concrete piers and abutments are in danger of collapse? Yikes, I hope they all don't collapse at the same time!
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Originally Posted by inspectorD View Post
Hey ,I like that superpost Neal linked to! Looks like a good fit for what you are going to do.
Good luck!
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Originally Posted by carljobs View Post
I had a similar situation with a mailbox. Somebody came down my street and hit all the mailboxes as they drove along with a baseball bat knocking them over. One of my neighbors found a product that has a piece of PVC that sits in concrete and the wood fits into the PVC. It's water tight so nothing gets in to rot the post. The post can be removed but the vinyl protector stays put. It remains in the concrete and the post slips in and out in case it has to be replaced. It's been great. You might want to consider digging your hole deeper than 24 inches for such a high post especially if you are putting a basketball hoop at the top. The thing we got is called Superpost.
Thanks for all the ideas, the product they have at the web site nealtw mentioned - http://www.removablepost.com/ would indeed seem to be an excellent solution.

I had been thinking about forming thin sheet metal around a 4x4 to make a 4x4 hole in concrete, but the money and added effort to use sheet metal, it seems it would be worth just getting the product at the removablepost site. The 24" would be the minimum I would get, but perhaps the 36" would be best, figuring using a 16' 4x4 and having to allow for the backboard height and having the rim 10' off the ground that should work out ok, the backboard would just extend 6" above the post.

Thanks again to everyone for all their ideas !
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