DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Bricks, Masonry and Concrete > Newbie needs help with concrete/stucco repair




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Old 04-22-2014, 03:21 PM  
bluebutterfly
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Default Newbie needs help with concrete/stucco repair

Hello all,

I'm a newbie DIY'er when it comes to concrete/stucco work, so am looking for a few tips. Attached are three pics showing the repair needed so you can get an idea of what it is and the size. This is on a typical 1960's ranch house. The previous owner left various types of concrete/stucco repair stuff in the garage but I have no idea if any of it is the right thing to use. Do I just mix it up and trowel it in? It's a somewhat indented area where the exterior has deteriorated down there at the bottom of the wall. This is part of the exterior of a detached garage wall. I'm sure it's a pretty basic repair and would like to fix it before it erodes more .....trying to avoid hiring someone for a job that is probably a basic fix. Thanks again for the assistance!



wall.jpg   wall1.jpg   wall2.jpg  
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Old 04-23-2014, 10:55 AM  
beachguy005
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You can get premixed stucco patch and just hand tool the profile to match.



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Old 04-23-2014, 11:53 AM  
bluebutterfly
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You can get premixed stucco patch and just hand tool the profile to match.
thanks for the info - should I prep the surface in any way beforehand? and what type of tool is best? a basic trowel? is there a particular brand of stucco patch you think is best? the prior homeowner has several different types in his garage....thanks again for further info!
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Old 04-23-2014, 02:47 PM  
nealtw
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How about listing what you have, someone might help you sort out what's usable.

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Old 04-23-2014, 03:18 PM  
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How about listing what you have, someone might help you sort out what's usable.
I just now opened several containers of what's in the garage, including DAP ready mixed stucco repair and another brand of stucco repair and all are dried up, unless water can be added to make them usable. So, looks like I'll have to buy some. I was reading up on DAP online and several people didn't like it, it was too "stretchy" and didn't seem to bond well, so may skip that brand. Any other suggestions as to what you use and have liked for the type of repair I'm doing would be appreciated. As you can see, the area is somewhat deep, not terribly deep but will require several layers gradually. Should I apply some type of bonding agent on the surface before? Or just tool it in directly on the surface as is....I'll be sure to clean it first and make sure there's no crumbling areas.....thanks again!
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Old 04-23-2014, 04:01 PM  
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Others that know more than I do should be along soon.

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Old 04-23-2014, 05:10 PM  
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You'll want to use a product that can be applied from your max depth, looks like 1/2 inch or so, to feathered. Some products require a bonding agent and some don't. Follow the directions.
You'll just remove any loose bits, apply the filler and tool it to match. I would use a putty knife. Whatever you use will become more workable as it sets up.
Frankly, I have a stucco on block house and had a chip on a corner I repaired. I just picked up a pint container of premixed stucco patch at HD, slapped it on and formed it with a putty knife. No mixing, no bonding agent, worked great.

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Old 04-23-2014, 05:51 PM  
bluebutterfly
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You'll want to use a product that can be applied from your max depth, looks like 1/2 inch or so, to feathered. Some products require a bonding agent and some don't. Follow the directions.
You'll just remove any loose bits, apply the filler and tool it to match. I would use a putty knife. Whatever you use will become more workable as it sets up.
Frankly, I have a stucco on block house and had a chip on a corner I repaired. I just picked up a pint container of premixed stucco patch at HD, slapped it on and formed it with a putty knife. No mixing, no bonding agent, worked great.
thanks very much, yes, it is about 1/2 inch or a bit more at certain points here and there, so it will require a bit of filling...thanks for the putty knife advice...i was going to use a small trowel but putty knife is much better.
I'll probably just pick up some standard pre-mix stucco patch at HD also...once I do the job I'll post pics and show how good or bad I did lol...thanks again!
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Old 04-24-2014, 11:13 PM  
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Tools are what we live for, right? Every trade has specialty tools, including cement. I would want you to have a margin trowel and a triangular trowel (brick) or a finishing trowel. Mix the patch material and press it into the repair hard with the margin trowel. Smooth it with the brick trowel or the finishing trowel.

I prefer the QuikCrete products for consistency and performance. Do not mix too wet, trowel it smooth. Sets up fast and is >3,500 psi when done.

trowel-2.jpg   trowel-1.jpg   trowel-3.jpg  


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Old 04-26-2014, 10:28 AM  
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Tools are what we live for, right? Every trade has specialty tools, including cement. I would want you to have a margin trowel and a triangular trowel (brick) or a finishing trowel. Mix the patch material and press it into the repair hard with the margin trowel. Smooth it with the brick trowel or the finishing trowel.

I prefer the QuikCrete products for consistency and performance. Do not mix too wet, trowel it smooth. Sets up fast and is >3,500 psi when done.
Thanks so much for this info....I'm sure your advice is excellent on this. I was at Home Depot yesterday (it was on my way so that's where I went ) and the only pre-mixed stucco I could find was DAP so I got that. I think the person who owned my home before has some QuikCrete left but it's not premixed, but I may try that as per your advice rather than the DAP, as I wonder if the DAP will do as well or hold the patch long-term. I want the repair to last and not have to redo it again. I did look at some of the other tools you mention, not knowing what they were for or how they were used....the prices put me off tho....since this is probably a one-time type of repair of this sort, I somehow couldn't justify paying what they wanted, especially for trowels, which all seemed to be around $18+. I also looked at Harbor Freight which has a great store in my area and they only had putty knives of various sizes....they had no trowels, although they may have had a margin type of trowel and I didn't know what it was. So, I ended up with basically a couple of sizes of putty knives and the DAP yesterday....wasn't too confident that I had what it takes to do the job right. Maybe I can find another tool around here that will accomplish the same thing, pushing the DAP (or Quikcrete) into the repair area to make sure it sticks and fills it in. Thanks again very much for your advice, it definitely is all about the right tool and the right patching compound!


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