DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Bricks, Masonry and Concrete > Newbie needs help with concrete/stucco repair




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Old 04-26-2014, 11:20 AM  
CallMeVilla
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Not sure where you live but Craigslist is your best friend here. Used tools all the time for all manner of jobs. How long can a cement trowel last? A lifetime, really. You can get away with some cheesy putty knife but the smoothing process with require care.

I prefer to use unmixed cement because I can mix it thinner or harder for the job.

Start building your tool inventory with the basics then acquire as you think your projects in the future might require. You can find EVERYTHING on Craigslist for a lot cheaper than new. Only my specialty tools are new. Save BIG MONEY doing this ...



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Old 04-27-2014, 11:12 AM  
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Not sure where you live but Craigslist is your best friend here. Used tools all the time for all manner of jobs. How long can a cement trowel last? A lifetime, really. You can get away with some cheesy putty knife but the smoothing process with require care.

I prefer to use unmixed cement because I can mix it thinner or harder for the job.

Start building your tool inventory with the basics then acquire as you think your projects in the future might require. You can find EVERYTHING on Craigslist for a lot cheaper than new. Only my specialty tools are new. Save BIG MONEY doing this ...
Thanks again for your advice. I never thought about looking on Craigslist for smaller tools, but you're absolutely right, I just looked at my local CL and there's various handiman tool yard sales going on and I bet I could've gotten a decent enough trowel for way less than new $18-20 , so will definitely do that. About the Quikcrete, I'm sure it's got a lot of advantages over pre-mixed - my main concern is that as a newbie at this, if the mixture isn't right, I might make a mess of it and end up having a bigger problem than I started with. On the other hand, I'm not convinced the DAP will do a great permanent fix on the problem either. So, I'll think about the Quikcrete, maybe I can mix up a small batch and experiment in an area in the garage or a wall where it won't matter and I can learn to work with it. Thanks again for all your help!


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Old 04-27-2014, 05:03 PM  
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With all due respect....you're really over thinking it. Just get the premixed, pack it in, get a stiff piece of cardboard and cut out the profile of finished wall and use it as a screed to match the existing.

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Old 04-27-2014, 11:04 PM  
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A margin trowel is your friend for this project, as the offset in its handle will allow you to apply more pressure against the fluid repair product as you try to force it into the repair area. Putty knives aren't designed for that, and will not be nearly as effective.

Are you really quibbling over spending $18 on a tool that will enable you to do the job properly? The peace of mind knowing that a job is being done properly would be worth far more than that, in my opinion.

And besides, it doesn't eat anything, so once purchased, it's not costing you anything. And having it available for future projects is an added bonus.

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Old 04-28-2014, 12:05 PM  
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With all due respect....you're really over thinking it. Just get the premixed, pack it in, get a stiff piece of cardboard and cut out the profile of finished wall and use it as a screed to match the existing.
Yeah, I'll probably go ahead and use the DAP that I bought because I don't quite feel ready to deal with the quickrete, even though it may be the better patch. The DAP directions say to paint the area to be patched with a high quality paint, I presume to make a better surface for the DAP to adhere to. As you can see in the photo, the surface is fairly rough and rocky/uneven, with crumbling areas, although I'm doing my best to clean it and get it as good a surface as possible. I'm not sure I understand your cardboard screed directions, but I think you're saying to use it to assist with packing the DAP in, getting it smooth and level with the existing sides and margins.....?
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Old 04-28-2014, 12:07 PM  
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A margin trowel is your friend for this project, as the offset in its handle will allow you to apply more pressure against the fluid repair product as you try to force it into the repair area. Putty knives aren't designed for that, and will not be nearly as effective.

Are you really quibbling over spending $18 on a tool that will enable you to do the job properly? The peace of mind knowing that a job is being done properly would be worth far more than that, in my opinion.

And besides, it doesn't eat anything, so once purchased, it's not costing you anything. And having it available for future projects is an added bonus.
Yeah, I can certainly see the putty knife isn't designed to truly handle this patch so that it looks good and really lasts. I'm sort of kicking myself now for not having gone ahead and bought the $18 trowel, even though most likely I won't have THAT many more projects I can do with it myself around here, but as you say, it'll last forever!
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Old 04-28-2014, 02:55 PM  
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What I meant by the screed is because of the profile of your patch. I couldn't really tell if the patch is to be as flat as the wall above it or if it is rounded like a piece of shoe mold. Doesn't matter. You just want to match it to the surrounding area as best you can.

Did the Dap say paint it before the fill or after?

As for the "right tool"...all that means is having the tool that allows you to satisfactorily complete the job. I've used a piece of cardboard to finish an edge on concrete. A chunk of granite as a sledge hammer and a bent nail as a screwdriver and they all did those jobs perfectly.

Don't kid yourself into believing you need the "right tool' and only the right tool to get anything done.
If you can afford to buy all of them...great. I do believe you can never have too many tools.

But by the same token, why spend 18 bucks on a tool may never use again vs a couple bucks on a tool you'll probably use all the time.

If you can't fill, smooth and tool that small patch with a 1.5 inch putty knife.....I don't know what else to tell you.

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Old 04-29-2014, 07:56 AM  
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On the other hand, I'm not convinced the DAP will do a great permanent fix on the problem either. So, I'll think about the Quikcrete, maybe I can mix up a small batch and experiment in an area in the garage or a wall where it won't matter and I can learn to work with it. Thanks again for all your help!
My point exactly. You SHOULD mix a small amount for the size of your damaged area. Since QuikCrete sets up quickly a large amount would be a mistake. Mix it to the consistency of thick peanut butter, so it can cling to the vertical surface. You can use a one gallon plastic milk jug with the top cut off to mix it. Put some cement in the jug then add water slowly to get the right consistency. You can always mix more cement if needed ...

Wet the damaged area first with a little water. Use the margin trowel to apply the QuikCrete to the area, pushing it into the surface. You might be able to use it to smooth the repair using a light hand. As it starts to go off (harden) you can still work it slightly to get the best finish.

It will NOT exactly match the old cement. Work carefully, do your best. You can repaint the foundation to blend everything.

Best of luck!
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Old 04-29-2014, 02:48 PM  
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What I meant by the screed is because of the profile of your patch. I couldn't really tell if the patch is to be as flat as the wall above it or if it is rounded like a piece of shoe mold. Doesn't matter. You just want to match it to the surrounding area as best you can.

Did the Dap say paint it before the fill or after?

As for the "right tool"...all that means is having the tool that allows you to satisfactorily complete the job. I've used a piece of cardboard to finish an edge on concrete. A chunk of granite as a sledge hammer and a bent nail as a screwdriver and they all did those jobs perfectly.

Don't kid yourself into believing you need the "right tool' and only the right tool to get anything done.
If you can afford to buy all of them...great. I do believe you can never have too many tools.

But by the same token, why spend 18 bucks on a tool may never use again vs a couple bucks on a tool you'll probably use all the time.

If you can't fill, smooth and tool that small patch with a 1.5 inch putty knife.....I don't know what else to tell you.
The DAP directions say to paint the surface BEFORE, using a high quality paint. All I have on hand is some white primer paint that I use for various touch-ups on things, not sure if that would seal it well enough. I realize I will also have to paint it afterwards, too, to match the existing exterior paint. So, makes me wonder if DAP has a problem adhering to cement/crumbling irregular type surfaces unless it can bond to a painted surface, since the directions say to paint it first. Thanks for your clarification about the cardboard screed, etc. I will try to do that. I also agree that just about anything can be used as a tool. My dad certainly did it a lot over the years, if he could "make do" ,he did. Not that it isn't also a good idea to use the precise right tool for the job, but it's also nice to keep money in the bank these days, too, esp, if it's a one or two-time use with a trowel. Some people may indeed use a trowel a lot....I probably won't be, because such jobs are a bit outside my capability. My main goal in doing the current patch job is to prevent further erosion. It started out as a small area of crumbling and obviously as you can see, it got bigger and bigger. So, before it's completely across all along the bottom of the foundation there, I'm trying to do a patch job. I noted other areas where the previous owner clearly used DAP or a DAP product to patch the stucco around the garage door frame, etc. I may still try to use the Quickcrete, but if it sets up fast, I may not be skilled enough to work it into the crack fast enough before I can get it smooth or whatnot. Thanks to everyone who took the time to weigh in on this repair job All have made good points on both sides!
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Old 04-29-2014, 02:53 PM  
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My point exactly. You SHOULD mix a small amount for the size of your damaged area. Since QuikCrete sets up quickly a large amount would be a mistake. Mix it to the consistency of thick peanut butter, so it can cling to the vertical surface. You can use a one gallon plastic milk jug with the top cut off to mix it. Put some cement in the jug then add water slowly to get the right consistency. You can always mix more cement if needed ...

Wet the damaged area first with a little water. Use the margin trowel to apply the QuikCrete to the area, pushing it into the surface. You might be able to use it to smooth the repair using a light hand. As it starts to go off (harden) you can still work it slightly to get the best finish.

It will NOT exactly match the old cement. Work carefully, do your best. You can repaint the foundation to blend everything.



Best of luck!
Thanks so much for all the tips. I'm still weighing the pros and cons of quickcrete vs. dap and may play around as I said with the quickcrete in some out of the way wall area to get a feel for how fast it sets up. If I feel confident about trying it, I may do so. I guess the worst thing that can happen is I'd have to chip it out and redo the patch with the DAP. I'd see pretty fast if I'm able to make it work out okay and mix the right consistency. Thanks again to all!


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