DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Bricks, Masonry and Concrete > Preparing footing surface for steel column




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Old 11-11-2011, 05:23 PM  
nealtw
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Bridgeman; Good point!!



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Old 11-12-2011, 06:08 AM  
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I still think your way over engineering this one simple job.
If the beam is slightly lifted so the coloum can be slid in place once lowered there will be 0 uplifting in the center of the room, from then on it will always be top loaded. The only side load would be if someone ran into it with a piece of furniture. A few simple Tap Cons would hold it in place at the bottom and some lags at the top.
A roof system would have up lift to deal with a floor does not.



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Old 11-12-2011, 01:47 PM  
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usually baseplates are set right on the conc footing. larger projects use non-shrink grout under the baseplate to level it perfect. Not sure if they have setting nuts under those columns though and just fill in the grout after the column is set or if they level the grout first...at any rate, the grout is 1/2"-1" thk. Better to drill the holes after the footing
is poured and use 1/2"-3/4" dia expan anchors. not sure the loads here so this is ballpark.

Architect in Westchester county NY

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Old 11-12-2011, 10:47 PM  
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west,

Not sure leveling nuts would be practical or justified in a situation like this, where the column is just a "stub" in a crawl space. Cantilever and overhead sign structures often use them when precision is needed to get the 20-ft.+/- columns truly "plumb." And as I and others have stated earlier, a leveling course of grout is also probably overkill (unless the finished concrete surface is really out of whack).

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Old 11-13-2011, 12:47 AM  
west
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not saying he should use leveling nuts or grout, just what i have seen on
"larger projects" i.e. commercial.

But now that i know God is present here, i will hold my comments as they are surely redundant.

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Old 12-07-2011, 06:05 PM  
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I just saw these few more replies to my question. I very much appreciate that. With this input I've decided to just bolt the plate to the footing and weld it afterwards (making sure to allow for sufficient curing first like BridgeMan said). As far as anchors I'll probably go with epoxy.

My concern now is how/if to fill the pipes with concrete. But that is a new issue so I started another thread.

Thanks again everyone.

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Old 12-08-2011, 01:37 AM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MoreCowbell View Post
My concern now is how/if to fill the pipes with concrete. But that is a new issue so I started another thread.
Something to think about before starting another thread on filling with concrete--a Schedule 40, 4" pipe (actual outside diameter of 4.5", wall thickness of 0.237") is capable of carrying a total compressive force of slightly less than 67,000 pounds. Based on a total steel area of 3.17 sq. in., and allowable compressive stress of 21,050 psi, Kl/r = 1.48. In other words, if your living room furniture weighs more than 33.5 tons per column, or you're possibly expecting lots of very heavy house guests, then yes, by all means fill the little buggers with concrete. Good luck on getting it in there.

On the other hand, should you choose to come back from the dark side of anal-hood, and just leave the pipes empty, that would be perfectly acceptable also. And one heck of a lot easier.
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Old 12-08-2011, 08:07 PM  
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Realize that this is a long time after the original post, however I am surprised that none ot the "experts" on here didn't mention expansion anchors. You can find several sizes of them in any good hardware department / store. With them all you have to do is set your pre drilled base plate on the concrete footer and when it is where you want it, just drill holes using masonary bits, then drive the expansion anchors into the holes and tighten the nuts on them.

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Old 08-29-2012, 07:42 AM  
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Just want to say thanks to the folks that gave me input on this. I finally finished the columns. Regarding the anchors I ended up hanging the pipe column from the girder about a 1/2" higher than the final height then hung the L-bolts from the base plate and placed the concrete. Afterwards, to get a nice uniform bearing surface for the steel, I lowered the column until it sunk into the concrete about an 1/8" inch.

The reason I didn't use a baseplate template to position the bolts is that I shortsightedly had the holes punched the exact diameter of the bolts - so there was no play at all, so I needed to use the actual thing.

I now digging and will sood be ready for my retaining wall which leads to another question - but that is something for a different thread.

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Old 08-29-2012, 07:59 AM  
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Well done, looks great.



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