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-   Bricks, Masonry and Concrete (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f17/)
-   -   question on resurfacing brick basement walls (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f17/question-resurfacing-brick-basement-walls-3295/)

barleypopmaker 12-31-2007 01:44 PM

question on resurfacing brick basement walls
 
Currently I have brick walls in my basement. I would like a smooth look to the walls instead of the older brick, and was wondering if I could use cement on the walls with a trowel to give it apperance I want. Would this work or do you think the cement would just fall apart or fall off? Thanks in advance for your advice.
-Jason

ToolGuy 12-31-2007 02:25 PM

Hi BarleyPopMaker. Welcome to the forums and Happy New Year! Did you bring some of that barley pop? :D

If the brick is clean and no moisture issues, you should be able to skim over it. I'd use Durobond 90 but someone here may know a little more than me and have other suggestions.

If the concrete has paint it should be removed first. If it has been sealed with a concrete sealer of any sort, the bond won't hold. but if its just raw, stable and most importantly dry, it shouldn't be a problem.

mudmixer 12-31-2007 02:44 PM

barleypop - I love the name, especially from the Republic of Wisconsin!

Are you talking about clay brick, concrete brick or concrete block?

barleypopmaker 01-01-2008 02:07 PM

It's clay brick, no paint, It does have some crumbling issues but it's not leaking any water any longer. There was some issues in the past before we moved in here with some drainage and it shows on the brick which is why I want a cleaner look to it, I took care of that by expanding some downspouts that moved the water away from the house.

And for the record, I've always got some good barley pop on tap ;) (right now I have a chocolate stout for winter) and in bottles since my taps are a new upgrade to my bar. And as the name says....I make it myself. I am in the process of trying to make this basement a bit more useable. Here was phase 1 which was my first attempt at some basic woodworking, and IMO the most important part of my basement.
http://www.barleypopmaker.info/assets/bar.jpg
http://www.barleypopmaker.info/assets/bartop.jpg.
behind the bar is concrete block, which is a not the section of the basement I am wanting to work on. The house was remodeled in the 80's and an extension was added so this part is newer. What I am trying to give an updated look to without redoing the whole foundation is the older part of the basement which is my workshop area.

ToolGuy 01-01-2008 03:52 PM

Sweeeeet! And I see you have a stool there waiting for me. :D

Nice job on the bar. I can easily picture friends hangin' out and enjoying some home made stout.

About smoothing out the brick, here's what I would do. The crumbling areas need to be cleaned up real well, and completely free from any lose dust. A corn broom is good for that, and some water to prevent creating a dust cloud. If you can blast it with the garden hose, all the better.

Then I would get some wood fiber plaster, a plastic mortar trough to mix it in, a mortar hoe to mix it with, a 14" hawk to hold it with while using a 12" or 14" steel trowel to apply it, which I would also get.

http://www.mytoolbox.net/houserepair...ster-Tools.jpg
Note the rounded corners on the hoe. I did that with my 4-1/4" angle grinder to accomodate the rounded corners inside the plastic trough. Pretty smart, eh?

Then I'd mix about half the bag of plaster with the recommended amount of water, and let it steep for a few minutes while I wet down the brick. That way it doesn't suck the water out of the plaster faster than you can apply it, and allows it more setting time.

I'd use the steel trowel to mash the mortar into the brick and deep into the joints so it gets a good bond, and I'd apply it thick enough to cover the brick by about 1/4" thick. I'd do this to about a 3' square area at a time, trying not to re-trowel what I've already applied, so as not to pull it away from the brick. If the wall starts getting dry I'd wet it again. Believe me, that brick is going to soak up a lot of water.

Then I'd clean my tools and admire my work.

Note, there is a good chance that over the years some of it is going to crack and come loose. No big deal, just chip it away and patch it with the same method.

phreaq 01-02-2008 11:40 AM

lol, you want to put cement ON to your bricks, and I'm trying to take cement OFF of mine :D

ToolGuy 01-02-2008 05:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by phreaq (Post 13764)
lol, you want to put cement ON to your bricks, and I'm trying to take cement OFF of mine :D

Maybe you guys could just trade houses! :p


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