DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum

DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Bricks, Masonry and Concrete (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f17/)
-   -   Repair 2" hole through brick wall (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f17/repair-2-hole-through-brick-wall-14363/)

FiveTenMatt 07-09-2012 04:03 PM

Repair 2" hole through brick wall
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hello all,
I recently purchased a condo, and upon moving in found a 1.5" hole through one of the walls (picture attached) that my house inspector apparently failed to notice. The hole goes from my living room straight through to the outside. I'd like to repair the hole, but I'm not sure what to do. I found this stuff at Home Depot that looks like caulk, but is supposed to be for repairing masonry cracks. Would this work? I don't have access to the outside of the building (I'm a few stories up), so how should I keep it from coming out the back of the hole as I fill it? Any thoughts on what else I should use? It's worth noting that I have no experience with masonry projects. Thanks for the help!

asbestos 07-09-2012 07:33 PM

I think a caulk would work. I would use a good quality exterior caulk. You could also buy a brick and crumble up some of the dust (or just get a little bit from the bottom of the pallet of bricks) and use that to put on the inside to make it less noticeable. I would shove a plastic bag in the hole most of the way through so that it acts as a stop and keeps the caulk from running out to the outside. Also since it is outside it may be a condo owners association issue thing. Since most of the hole is not in your condo it is in the building itself.

joecaption 07-10-2012 07:11 AM

Use morter not caulking. Caulkings not going to match the look.
Yes you would have to buy a whole bag, but a bag of morter would cost less then a tube of silicone caulking, just toss what's left over.

CallMeVilla 07-10-2012 10:49 AM

Listen to Joe . . . NO CAULK. Pack the hole with mortar (no gravel) and trowel it smooth on the outside. If you mix the mortar very wet, it will just run out . . . try a drier mix and pack it as deeply as possible using a stick to push it inside.

Have fun

elbo 07-10-2012 12:05 PM

no caulk, but the condo assn is responsible for the repair to the brick. fortunately the hole is in the mortar joint so the repair would be easy
If you have to do it yourself, clean the hole thoroughly then dampen it, make a small amount of concrete patching compound using a concrete additive instead of water. make the mix very stiff and just use a small amount dont try to fill the hole all at once because the patching material will slump down and leave a space at the top. the next day, do it again and with a small dowel pack the compound in tight, again with a stiff mix. The stuff you put in the day before will act as a plug to keep the new mix in. The third day repeat but bring the patch flush to the inside brick
seems like a lot of trouble, but it is the only way you will be able to keep it water tight
But really try to get the condo assn to fix it

asbestos 07-11-2012 09:29 AM

It's a small hole in the wall, I don't know what everyone's issue is with caulk. It is a small hole I promise you there are holes all over that building sealed with caulk. I am not talking about crummy latex stuff. I am talking about serious caulk. The last big commercial project I worked on a (25 floors) the seams in the concrete sections of siding were all sealed with caulk, these seams were big also.This was not a low dollar building either. Sure mortar would be ideal. but He only needs about 6 oz and is going to have to buy a whole bag, He can not get to the outside, and he probably does not need to buy a quart of bonder also.

BridgeMan 07-12-2012 08:37 PM

If the condo association tells you to get lost, try the following:

Measure the depth of the hole, which should be the thickness of the wall. Buy a length of wooden dowel at your local big box store for a few bucks, slightly smaller in diameter than the smallest part of the hole, make a mark on it about 2" less than the wall thickness, then stuff a short piece of snug-fitting backer rod (or any piece of round foam rubber) into the hole, pushing it with the dowel until the mark you made is flush with the inside wall. Then patch/fill the hole with your choice of caulk or mortar (or even stucco, which can be bought in small repair kits for a few dollars in your choice of colors). I'd use stucco myself, as it will be a lot easier than caulk to completely fill the hole up to the foam plug--just mix it stiff, and ram it in with the dowel (being careful not to push too hard and dislodge the plug).


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:51 PM.