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-   -   replacing foundation walls (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f17/replacing-foundation-walls-1813/)

elementx440 01-24-2007 05:04 PM

replacing foundation walls
 
So I am considering buying a repo home. I really like it, it's a good deal but needs all sorts of basic work. The worst of all is the foundation, the walls are bowing and need to be replaced. I got a quote of 19000 to do 3 of the 4 walls. It sounds about right to me. I'm just wondering what other's experiences are with replacing foundation walls. Good/Bad? What's the risk involved? Would you do it?

glennjanie 01-24-2007 08:45 PM

Welcome Elementx:
I wonder, are we talking about a foundation not over 4' at the highest point?
If that's the case, no I would not attempt to correct it. Some shrubery will hide it for you.

However, if we are talking about a basement wall, then we have some real problems. The house would have to be jacked up off the walls, tear the walls down and excavate some earth. Then find someone who will work under the house to build new walls. If the bowed basement walls are made of concrete blocks (CMU), I would recommend going back with a poured concrete wall. If it is already concrete, I would run as fast as I could.

The greatest risk I see is the house falling on someone and killing them.
Glenn

Daryl in Nanoose 01-24-2007 09:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by elementx440 (Post 7615)
So I am considering buying a repo home. I really like it, it's a good deal but needs all sorts of basic work. The worst of all is the foundation, the walls are bowing and need to be replaced. I got a quote of 19000 to do 3 of the 4 walls. It sounds about right to me. I'm just wondering what other's experiences are with replacing foundation walls. Good/Bad? What's the risk involved? Would you do it?

Could you possibly elaborate a little. What are your foundation made of, height how old is the house. This would give a lot more of a clear picture. Speaking of pictures is it possible for you to take a few for us.

elementx440 01-25-2007 03:42 PM

House is from late 40s,

here's a ton of pictures of all over the house...
http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b214/jcnoernberg/8189%20Mulberry%20Road%20inside/

My uncle who manages a construction company said it would cost about 20k, so my estimate of 19k is spot on in his opinion... granted he only saw the pics as well.

the contractor guarentees the work for at least a year, i think he might give me two years... is that enough time to tell?

mudmixer 01-25-2007 09:43 PM

After looking at the photos, I would hire a professional engineer and defintely not a friend or relative to look at the foundation.

It is hard to spot details on the photos because of the distortion and shadows, but I would be concerned about the entire foundation and the attempts to correct the structural and moisture problems. Not much looks good.

Has anyone put a level vertically to the walls? There appears to be cracks in the walls that are horizontal or stair-step - That is not good.

Your uncle is low on the repair cost.

A two year guarantee is a joke and worth nothing!!

glennjanie 01-26-2007 12:59 PM

Hey Elementx:
The way I see the pictures, you have a lot of leaking which might be helped a lot by making sure the surface drains away from the houwe, installing gutters and piping their drains away.
The only serious spot I can see is at the window in P1030299. It looks like the floor joists run with that wall and the problem could be dug out by hand, take the blocks out and re-lay them and put the dirt back gently while providing for run-off.
It looks like the house has been vacant for an extended period, needs lots of cleaning and some removal of inappropiate materials (like the parquet in the bath). Do you plan to flip it or live in it? My house was built is 1956 and has some cracks as bad as yours except where that window is pushed in. The previous owner dried it up but I can still see daylight in places. But hey, it has been standing for 50 years already so I'm not worried.
Glenn

elementx440 01-26-2007 03:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mudmixer (Post 7681)
Your uncle is low on the repair cost.

here's some of the work the uncle was involved in... http://www.icprojectweb.com/...they don't do residential work, he just provided a quote and insight. he did his own house a few years back.... the point is i trust his estimate more than a strangers or someone running a company out of a pickup truck... besides my uncle can beat up your uncle :)
its a hundred linear feet, priced at $180/foot, that seems to be the going rate around here, do you have a better estimate of the costs or are you just guessing?

Quote:

Originally Posted by mudmixer (Post 7681)
A two year guarantee is a joke and worth nothing!!

thats what i was sort of figuring, but that was just one companies warranty, what do you think should be standard? i was hoping for at least a decade or two!

So about the engineer... everyone's telling me to invest in one... and I've talked to a few, but I'm wondering, what is he going to tell me? I don't believe I want to salvage the walls as is, so how can paying him $500 help? Is he just going to say "yup they gotta go..."?

mudmixer 01-26-2007 04:43 PM

If you are satisfied with buying the house and the estimate of replacing the walls, you do not need an engineer.

When you build the walls make sure you build a proper basement with drain tile and sump pump so you don't have the same problem again. If you don't get rid of the water you will continue to have water and structural problems - after all, the poor soil and the water are the cause of the problems.

The basement wall can be either block or poured. In most areas, block is preferred for underpins because you can get up a foot or two quickly in case of water and it is often easier to place the top course instead of pouring. Too often, these situations lead the contractors to pour too wet since they do not have the room to do it right. You can get the same strength with either block or poured concrete.

My business is consulting so I get work if people do it wrong, but I don't travel since I have too many free tickets now.

maveric7383 02-01-2010 07:23 PM

I had Peak come out to my house, Great company.


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