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-   -   Adding support beam in basement (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f32/adding-support-beam-basement-5810/)

Jschoppe 01-01-2009 09:03 PM

Adding support beam in basement
 
I am adding a new load bearing beam in my basement so that I can remove and exisiting support post which will open up space for a new room. The new support beam will run along side the old beam to help offset the removal of the old post which will create a 14' span between supports . My qustion is if I install a new steel post up against the foundation wall will I need to pour a new footing. I believe the new post will be sitting on the 4" cement slab which is on top of the foundation wall footing. I drilled 8" down and was still in cement. The spot I drilled was about 4" from the foundation wall. At about 8" away from the wall I hit crushed stone at about 4" Deep . Question i have is the support post ok to sit on the slab is there is a foundation wall footing? Any advise will help

inspectorD 01-02-2009 09:41 AM

Yup
 
That sounds like it will work. Usually you attach the column to the wall with a bracket from Simpson Strong-Tie - Helping to Build Stronger, Safer Structures.

Since you posted this question, I would like to breach a good subject.
A bit more advice I will give is this, if you have not already, get a permit, and possibly an engineer to look at what you are doing. I know it is a Pain in the pocket, and you may be afraid of the department in your area. Most folks are., some for good reason too.
However I am going to share a short little story. A couple recently finished a beautiful master bathroom remodel on their home. They pulled no permits and had done the work themselves. They knew enough to get the job done.
One week later a pipe froze , and leaked water all night long down through more floors of the home, below was the kitchen. You know how bad this story ends. The really bad part is the insurance Co will not cover anything. That means , no cleanup of the water, damaged cabinets, buckling wood floors, finished basement ceilings, kitchen ceilings....you get the drift.
I would hate to have something happen to folks out there when they do not CYA. Insurance CO's are getting tougher, and I am afraid it will only go downhill from here.
Good luck on your project, it sounds nice. Sorry for the soapbox, just trying to help out.:)

Faithers03 01-14-2009 12:07 PM

I would recommend getting an engineer as well. Think about it this way. If your columns are 14'-0" apart and you use 40psf for live load(code for residences) and 20psf for dead load and you assume that beam is only supporting 5'-0" of width, you have over 4000lbs on that slab. 4000lbs is something to think about.


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