DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Framing and Foundation > Basement Main Beam Replacement




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Old 11-11-2011, 03:23 PM  
joecaption
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Originally Posted by johnbaum View Post
Thanks for all the advise guys, I really appreciate it.

Up here in WV we have some pretty hard packed Clay and Rock. The posts that currently hold the house up are sitting directly on the basement floor. They don't appear to be receeding into the floor, the floor is not cracking and from knowing the previous owners, these posts have been in place for at least over 15 years. The only problem is that the posts are digging into the rotted beam. I was hoping that the span of the basement could be crossed without the use of posts at all to give more useable floor space (wanted to make it a "Man Cave"). If need be though, Posts could be installed and I could cut away the basement floor to pour a footer for them.

The inside of the basement walls measure 22'8" (Again inside measurements) the actual border foundation is approximately 2' outside the basement walls. The basement walls however seem very strong and show no signs of buckeling or water infiltration but are not complete (with courses of block all the way to the floor joist) but blocks could be mortered in place to make it a supporting wall with ease. I guess my question is could an LVL be used to span the 23' basement without any center supports at all? or perhaps say one at 6' coming from the wall in each direction leaving an aproximate 11' gap with no support?
Neal, reread the last line of his post. That's what I was replying to.


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Old 11-11-2011, 03:49 PM  
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Yes I see now. I thought he was going for two posts and 3 beams.



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Old 11-14-2011, 02:39 PM  
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Another idea I had was to place two steel beams across the bottom of the floor joists that spans the width of the house. One on each side of the existing beam to be removed about half way the distance of the floor joists. (See Attachment) I was thinking that using this method I could possibly eliminate the center beam altogether by peicing in material between the joists and securing them together with steel plates. I think that the steel beams may need to be closer together to support the middle but still may afford space enough between them to make a decent sized room. Any idea if this would work? There are a number of steel beam manufactuers available to choose from, one being these folks here, LiteSteelbeam? - Installation Guide

Please keep in mind that the drawing is just to illustrate the idea and the amount of floor joists are not indicative of size.

Thanks again for all the help.
John

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Old 11-14-2011, 04:01 PM  
joecaption
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Sounds like a pie in the sky idea, you need to have an on site engineer to speck any of this stuff your thinking about to size it and for what supports your going to need. And you will need a permit on this one.
That one beam would require you to punch out the foundation, add footings on each end and just how do you figure on sliding it in and setting it?
Can it be done yes, but not DIYed.
If you try and DIY this your whole house may suffer.

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Old 11-14-2011, 10:11 PM  
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Well and engineer may be cheaper than a crew of Construction workers. No Code here at all. No Permits needed, No inspections needed. I don't believe the foundation would need to be punched rather the beam bolted to the foundation as it would butt up to it and the beam wold be resting on the Basement Wall only 1.5 to 2fr away.

You are probably right, just trying to get ideas and opinions. Wife and I have discussed and we will get a contractor in to see what they say about the whole problem and $$$$. I wanted to have some opinions before any come out so I can at least tell if I get a bunch of BS or straight talk and pricing.

Thanks Again!
John

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Old 11-14-2011, 10:59 PM  
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If you start with contractors, you will have different prices for different solutions, you will end up buying someones b,s.
Start with an engineer, everyone quotes the same job, really easy to sort out the b.s.

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Old 11-22-2011, 01:02 PM  
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Ok, spoke to an Engineer/Structural Draftsman and all around handy man kind of guy and he suggested that I construct two temporary beams for temporary support and use several jack posts to hold the floor across the studs and basement walls while the old beam is removed and the LAM beam is installed. He also said that where any of the floor Joists are bad to construct "Boots" out of similar sized lumber (Local saw mill true 2x10) and hang all joists to the LAM Beam with Joist hangers. He said that once the floor joists are level and attached to the LAM Beam there will be no deflection and that the LAM Beam would not require any support and will clearspan the width of the basement. He seemed quite confident and had no reason to BS me because he is not a contractor rather a family friend. Does this seem to you guys like sound advice?

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Old 11-22-2011, 03:46 PM  
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You didn't say how high the beam is. At twenty some feet it would have to be close to 20" high. I would suggest you put a footing and post right beside the stair case. Now your beams are about 7 and 14 ft and if you put another post at the short foundation wall your actual span is only about 12 ft. That would bring your beem down to 10 or 12" depending on number of plys. I would go full length for repairing floor joists. Boots you call them do work but drilling holes up there is a treat.

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Old 11-23-2011, 04:36 AM  
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From the Basement floor to the bottom of the beam and floor joists is about 7ft. Not real sure what you mean by "how high the beam is. At twenty some feet it would have to be close to 20" high." The basement floor wall to wall is a little over 22ft 8in wide and then the beam itself continues about another foot and a half outside the basement walls and rests on the foundation.

So instead of the "Boots" you recommend removing the entire old joist and putting a new one in it's place or sistering and leaving the old joist there?

Thanks Again for the advice!
John

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Old 11-23-2011, 07:11 AM  
joecaption
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Now go back and reread my first reply to your first post, that's exactly what I suggested that you do.
We do this type work alot when working on older houses.
Forget the "boots" just sister a new full length floor joist, it's never a good idea to remove an old floor joist, it will mess up the floors above it when you try to pull it out.
And just one LVL is not going to cut it, any real lumber yard that sells LVL's or even contacting the manufacture directly can speck out the width, thickness and number needed for that span.



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