DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Framing and Foundation > Can I do this??? Post and beam question





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Old 02-05-2008, 06:05 AM  
inspectorD
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Laminated veneered lumber, basisally the same as what you said.
There are other types of engineered beams, this is the one you need. It's the least expensive...and not for looks.

You could size your own beam ..like I said, however we don't know what the loads are on your home.

Grand piano, fishtanks, or hot tubs...oh my...

I guess when you start to see to many things done questionable...you start to be cynical.



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Old 02-05-2008, 06:30 AM  
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You guys are just too conservative and get worried too easily. He just wants some information to see what is possible. I know you don't know me from Adam but I can tell you I've been a registered Professional Engineer for over 30 years. My information is based on quickie calculations to try to keep the stiffness and stress of the new support beam equal to the old one so there will be no perceived difference felt on the floor above. Armed with this information and having thought about the alternatives, he should be able to help make decisions for the final design of this project...



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Old 02-05-2008, 06:43 AM  
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Default Craig...

It's time to make some money on the side.
I understand you completely Craig, folks can do alot of things themselves with lots of background. I just see to much not followed through on so I lean to the side of caution...expecially when I am not there to see it in person. Being an engineer, I did't mean anything by the train guy comment either, you've earned your right to give that advice which others should not.
He can always just do what he wants. I just give my opinion.

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Old 02-05-2008, 06:47 AM  
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So thats what they are called.. They look like a 4"x8" chunk of plywood.. I price the 10" and it cost $10 a foot. The guy at the lumber yard said they are equivent in strength as the same thing in standard lumber (2 2x8). But have less deflection and come in longer and straighter cuts.. I was expecting them to be stronger and couldnt justify the price difference and went with the standard lumber.. I dont know what you would need maybe 2 12x6 using my lumber yards guys advice. i think they are stronger than he is saying though.

I dont know what access you have to your basement but getting a 24' piece of lumber in your basement and in place will be almost impossible

I would use this idea as only a last resort.

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Old 02-05-2008, 05:45 PM  
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I dont see how LVL bolted into the beam would be stronger than welding plate steel. I would think if anything I should put LVL on both sides of the beam and go with deeper than the steel. I have room to get the beam in as I need to cut a couple of windows into the basement, which is only about 3' from being able to cut a walk-out. But that is a different project all together Basement first landscaping later Thanks for all the input guys.

btw I have no idea how to read the chart on that website you sent me, I had seen it before but it just confuses me. Definitely going to have to get an architect on this one.

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Old 02-05-2008, 08:11 PM  
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I didnt notice you put the width of your i-beam in your post. an 8''X5'' i beam could either be an w8 -18 or w8-21 beam.. The chart says a 24' wide one story trusses home can span 17.6' or 18.8' accordingly

Using that number with craigs calculations are puts you at a 24' max span with the steel plates..

18' to 24' is an 150% increase..

I like your steel plate idea as long as your a good wielder. I would add a foot wide plate over the seams because that will be your weakest points.

Hope this helps

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Old 02-05-2008, 10:45 PM  
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Awesome, glad to hear that my idea might work, I'll still take it to a pro to be sized pry but its good to hear that my idea is plausable. As far as the welding goes, my best friend from high school is a certified welder and a millwright. Used to work for him, but then I went to college and eventually ended up in trucking. I'd pry have him weld it for me as he is a far better welder (and he has a really nice miller bobcat portable stick welder that I'd need) thanks for the help.

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Old 03-25-2008, 10:23 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigFL View Post
You guys are just too conservative and get worried too easily. He just wants some information to see what is possible. I know you don't know me from Adam but I can tell you I've been a registered Professional Engineer for over 30 years. My information is based on quickie calculations to try to keep the stiffness and stress of the new support beam equal to the old one so there will be no perceived difference felt on the floor above. Armed with this information and having thought about the alternatives, he should be able to help make decisions for the final design of this project...

While we're on the subject - let me toss out my similar question.

I have a question I hope you can answer. I have a 1926 built, 2 story home in Villa Park (with a full basement)

Currently, I have a wooden beam that supports the first floor. This beam is 8" x 6" (6" tall 8" wide). It runs approximately 35 feet. It is supported by the chimney and foundation on the ends and has 3 support columns placed approximately 8 feet apart along with a load carrying wall near the chimney..

My first concern is that the beam, although not broken, does have a lot of horizontal checking and cracking.

My second concern is that I would like to remove 2 of the three support posts to allow better use of the basement space.

My question is this. What can I do to strengthen the beam so that first, it's safe and second, I can remove the 2 support poles closest to the foundation?

I am sure I could replace the beam with a steel beam, but would prefer instead to reinforce the beam with wood products if possible. (installation and fabrication costs are my concern here) My thinking is that I could sister several 2x8 dimension lumber or perhaps Parralam or LVL beams onto the existing beam. If I could keep the height of the additional beams to 8" I would be quite happy.

This is a preliminary question. Ultimately I would need drawings to get a permit to accomplish this, but I am first interested in figuring out what I would need to do so I can determine if it would be cost effective.
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Old 03-26-2008, 12:41 AM  
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Without seeing, and knowing what's being supported by that beam, It would be impossible to answer this. You need an engineer actually, or at the very least, a specialist in this type of structural modification. The manufacturer of the lam beams will send a rep to estimate the load and the required beam in most cases. I'd guess though that steel would be the best if you want to keep your headroom. No wood products that I know of will span 16' with a live load unless you go over 10" high. If you have load bearing walls above this beam, I'll bet you'll have to go even larger.
Removing posts changes the structural dynamics of a house. It's not a job to be taken lightly or to be experimented with.

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Old 03-26-2008, 12:56 AM  
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Well, my thinking is that if we know what's working now - then it can be figured from there.

I know what your saying about wood - but what would happen if, lets say, I sistered 3 or 4 2x8s with plywood inbetween?



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