DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Framing and Foundation > Framing Wall - Poor Workmanship or Acceptable Practise




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Old 02-10-2014, 04:28 PM  
nealtw
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But shimming the plate??? OMG ...
Not sure it's that bad, happens some times, he did shim directly under each stud, caulking under the edge of the plate will stop the draft.
We would have had to put a double and hangers for the cantilever but if that was called for it will fail and he will be butting them in. Rob should be checking the plans!!



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Old 02-10-2014, 05:01 PM  
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Upon further evaluation of this one picture... (please take more)
It does look like Neils eye (and the rest of us) missed that there may well be a steel post under the garage door beam.... this was the one that had me most worried.
And as long as it IS connected to the foundation with BOLTS... it should be good to go...



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Old 02-10-2014, 05:30 PM  
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In fact I have been doing this work for a while and have never had to install a steel post and I'm in an eathquake zone, but our newest code calls for stress walls where you have to add blocks to the wall ever four feet and nail the crap out of it, two or three or four exterior and three or four walls interior on each floor. New codes for exterior doors is said to be so tough that most of the national brands are just leaving the province.

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Old 02-10-2014, 06:20 PM  
CallMeVilla
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We have all probably done moment frames ... but I don't see the framing here which suggests a steel post for that kind of structure. To me, it looks like a wooden support for the steel beam.

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Old 02-10-2014, 07:17 PM  
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Don't have many pictures but here is one from a few days earlier. That small section between joists is just covered with a thin strip of OSB only crossing those two studs. There is a bedroom over the garage.

To be honest I just wanted to see if this is they way it is done these days. Being a DIYer I have done work in quite a few houses generally 1970's era and have never come across any wall that wasn't spaced 16" on centre for its entire length except at the ends of a wall.

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Old 02-10-2014, 07:57 PM  
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That does look odd but usually we would lay the sheets on their sides with a half inch gap between the upper and lower sheets and the upper and lower joints don't line up. But I have seen plywood put up like this. As far as the layout is concerned , the drywall always misses layout by six inches at the corner because of the corner and if you move the 3 inch space to the end front or back you would find the there would be a cavity that could not be insulated so the framer started from each end meeting in the middle. I would also suggest this may have been dione in a hurry to get it ready for the delivery of the beams. Even if your garage isn't going to be insulated the framer would have done this out of habbit, good habit. If you have jogs in or out on the house you may find the layout starts with odd measurements. Framers try to get floor joists directly above studs and studs directly above joists. Missing is not reason for failure as the double plate on the wall is there for that reason. It is just an attempt to make it look pretty. If they had layed the sheeting it's side and you didn't have a cantiliver above the stud they could have been left it out and they could have moved the space to the front section and just left the stud out without a problem.
As we use one person to do all the layout on a house that odd measurement would have ended up at the post with beam above and you would not have noticed. This looks like one guy started at the back and one guy started at the front and that is where they met. I would spend more time thinking about the wedges under the wall as if they are just wedge cut peices they could put side presure on the wall and the should be flat peices that support the sill for the full width.

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Old 02-11-2014, 05:27 AM  
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Originally Posted by CallMeVilla View Post
We have all probably done moment frames ... but I don't see the framing here which suggests a steel post for that kind of structure. To me, it looks like a wooden support for the steel beam.
Well, if you look at his picture..I hope he puts up another of the garage door beam.. you can see a space between the 2 pieces of wood. It also looks like a shadow in there that could be a post...Gosh I love guessing games.
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Old 02-11-2014, 05:50 AM  
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Gosh I love guessing games.

Ok, how many fingers am I holding up?
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Old 02-11-2014, 06:09 AM  
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I didn’t have a problem with the close studs as it allowed for a full sheet in both corners and that is where you get a good deal of your lateral strength. I wouldn’t like that sliver of sheathing at all. And I really wouldn’t like that little piece of bottom plate stuck in there. My dad used to call that a “Dutchman”. I would have thought with the framing working out like that they should have cut the last sheet short so the strip would have spanned 3 studs. Likewise the bottom plate had to be joined someplace but I personally wouldn’t want a piece just stuck in that short.
Neil brings up a great point about all the shims and if you look at the second photo all the weight on that beam post is sitting on 2 shims. Neil pointed out how the double top plate spreads out the load and the bottom plate also has to distribute the load over the block. The shims cause point loading I would think.
I don’t think the reason for keeping a straight line up thru the structure studs, joists, studs, rafters etc. is just a good idea as far as appearance. The job of the double plate IMO isn’t to be a beam as much as a method of having continuous band without breaks in it because the joints are overlapped especially in the corners. If you compare the top plate to what we do over a window or door in terms of a header with wood and plywood on edge that’s designed to be a beam and it’s really doing the same thing as the double top plate is being asked to do when a bearing stud is coming down midway on it. I know there is a rim joist also acting as a beam. I’m not a professional and I’m sure it might not make a noticeable difference in the finished structure but when I see it done lined up it always looks impressive.
Not knowing a lot about framing and trying to learn here, why did they switch direction of the floor joists for that last 4 feet before the outside wall? My other question is why isn’t that last long joist that the short ones tee into not at least a double? It seems that one should be doubled up to replace the ones not there just like you would on a stairway opening. The short ones don’t require a hanger?

To the OP please don’t take my post as an expert opinion I’m someone like you who has done a little framing and trying to learn and question also.

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Old 02-11-2014, 09:06 AM  
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Bud, the joists turned are for a cantilever out over the wall they should be hangered to a double , but that should fail on inspection. Your idea of the suds ubder rafters dosn't work as the trusses are 24" on center and the framer won't know exactly where the land until there are delivered, Usually you get one every 48" unless it is a complex roof, then all bets are off. We did one in Dec. with three dormers. Each dormer needs a gable, there was no standard layout for the entire house. You just make sure there is backing for the drywall at every corner and then they are on there own.



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