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-   -   Help with bouncy floors (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f32/help-bouncy-floors-12370/)

papakevin 11-03-2011 09:18 PM

3 Attachment(s)

OK, I'm trying to post some photos, so I hope it works. Here's an update on where I am as of tonight:

(1) - I'm sore as hell and feel like I've been beat with a bat. Prior to putting down the new vapor barrier there was one down when the crawl space flooded. When I crawled around under the house, I created a ton of small imprints in the mud below. It dried hard when I removed the old vapor barrier, so it's like crawling / laying on large rocks and it sucks. Plus it's a tight crawl space, so I used some muscles I haven't used in a while.

(2) - Smart thing I did do was buy a couple clamp lights to use to light up the crawl space. Prior to doing this I was working with a flashlight which sucked. Being able to see what you are doing without holding a light is a big help.

(3) - A +1 vote for NASA. As my coveralls, I wore an old Challenger flightsuit / jumpsuit that I purchased at Kennedy Space center years ago. It's not a real one, but the cheap ones they sell to visitors. Anyway, after the Challenger accident, they removed the shuttle patch and sold them at discount. The placement of the zippered pockets on the arms, chest, made really great places to hide a small flashlight, camera, screws, etc.

(4) - Used longer 2x4's than necessary so I could rest them on the block wall. Because the house is old construction (40's) the sill plate is just a bit thicker than the 2x4, which allowed me to prop it up while I attached the other end. Installation was easy once it was in place, which was good because I was working solo.

(5) - Strong drill with a fully charged battery is key. With the number of screws you install per board, you need to do a lot of screwing (with the drill that is), and you really need to push up hard to verify you are getting a good bite. Used a Craftsman 19.2 volt drill and it worked well.

Will check it out tomorrow to see how successful the process is thus far. I didn't want to bounce on the floor or walk on it until the liquid nails has dried. Hopefully more updates will follow this weekend.

Trying to post photos... we'll see if this works.


papakevin 11-03-2011 09:18 PM

3 Attachment(s)

OK, I'm trying to post some photos, so I hope it works. Here's an update on where I am as of tonight:

(1) - I'm sore as hell and feel like I've been beat with a bat. Prior to putting down the new vapor barrier there was one down when the crawl space flooded. When I crawled around under the house, I created a ton of small imprints in the mud below. It dried hard when I removed the old vapor barrier, so it's like crawling / laying on large rocks and it sucks. Plus it's a tight crawl space, so I used some muscles I haven't used in a while.

(2) - Smart thing I did do was buy a couple clamp lights to use to light up the crawl space. Prior to doing this I was working with a flashlight which sucked. Being able to see what you are doing without holding a light is a big help.

(3) - A +1 vote for NASA. As my coveralls, I wore an old Challenger flightsuit / jumpsuit that I purchased at Kennedy Space center years ago. It's not a real one, but the cheap ones they sell to visitors. Anyway, after the Challenger accident, they removed the shuttle patch and sold them at discount. The placement of the zippered pockets on the arms, chest, made really great places to hide a small flashlight, camera, screws, etc.

(4) - Used longer 2x4's than necessary so I could rest them on the block wall. Because the house is old construction (40's) the sill plate is just a bit thicker than the 2x4, which allowed me to prop it up while I attached the other end. Installation was easy once it was in place, which was good because I was working solo.

(5) - Strong drill with a fully charged battery is key. With the number of screws you install per board, you need to do a lot of screwing (with the drill that is), and you really need to push up hard to verify you are getting a good bite. Used a Craftsman 19.2 volt drill and it worked well.

Will check it out tomorrow to see how successful the process is thus far. I didn't want to bounce on the floor or walk on it until the liquid nails has dried. Hopefully more updates will follow this weekend.

Trying to post photos... we'll see if this works.


papakevin 11-03-2011 09:18 PM

3 Attachment(s)

OK, I'm trying to post some photos, so I hope it works. Here's an update on where I am as of tonight:

(1) - I'm sore as hell and feel like I've been beat with a bat. Prior to putting down the new vapor barrier there was one down when the crawl space flooded. When I crawled around under the house, I created a ton of small imprints in the mud below. It dried hard when I removed the old vapor barrier, so it's like crawling / laying on large rocks and it sucks. Plus it's a tight crawl space, so I used some muscles I haven't used in a while.

(2) - Smart thing I did do was buy a couple clamp lights to use to light up the crawl space. Prior to doing this I was working with a flashlight which sucked. Being able to see what you are doing without holding a light is a big help.

(3) - A +1 vote for NASA. As my coveralls, I wore an old Challenger flightsuit / jumpsuit that I purchased at Kennedy Space center years ago. It's not a real one, but the cheap ones they sell to visitors. Anyway, after the Challenger accident, they removed the shuttle patch and sold them at discount. The placement of the zippered pockets on the arms, chest, made really great places to hide a small flashlight, camera, screws, etc.

(4) - Used longer 2x4's than necessary so I could rest them on the block wall. Because the house is old construction (40's) the sill plate is just a bit thicker than the 2x4, which allowed me to prop it up while I attached the other end. Installation was easy once it was in place, which was good because I was working solo.

(5) - Strong drill with a fully charged battery is key. With the number of screws you install per board, you need to do a lot of screwing (with the drill that is), and you really need to push up hard to verify you are getting a good bite. Used a Craftsman 19.2 volt drill and it worked well.

Will check it out tomorrow to see how successful the process is thus far. I didn't want to bounce on the floor or walk on it until the liquid nails has dried. Hopefully more updates will follow this weekend.

Trying to post photos... we'll see if this works.


papakevin 11-04-2011 09:05 PM

4 Attachment(s)

OK, here's a couple updates. First, the ruling on the 2x4's, then an attempt to answer the questions on the beams.

So, the verdict is....... it worked! BRIDGEMAN for President! Yes, there still is some bounce in the floor, however the improvements are noticeable and it should be good enough that no additional floor support is needed. My only regret is not completing the entire job all at once, because now I need to go back under and do the 3-4 joists that I didn't do in the living room. And yes, I'm still sore and walking with a slight limp from my last trip in the crawl space....

On a related note, I may go ahead and install underneath the beams that support the floor that supports a couple of the interior walls. (Let me explain...). Apparently the house was built so that the entire hardwood floor was installed first, then the walls were built on top of the wood floor. The walls themselves are not necessarily aligned with the beams, so in some instances the walls are actually resting on the wood floor in between two beams. Seems a little odd to me, but maybe that's the way they did it back in the 40's.

Now the beam question Nealtw asked about. Sad to say I didn't give the center beam a close look, but I did take some random photos while I was under the house. From what I can see, I believe the center beam is actually two 2x10's nailed together, with some 2x 2 block strips installed along the bottom to hold the 2x8's in place. Guessing they did this to rest the 2x8's on the rails, then toe nailed the 2x8's into the 2x10's. Maybe they didn't have joist hangers back then, or maybe this was just the cheap way of doing it. I'm adding some photos for additional review / comments. Don't know if adding anything to the bottom of these joists (like with the 2x4's) would help add structural support or hurt, but open to feedback and discussions.

Bridgeman, thanks again for the suggestion. I really didn't know if it would work, but I did have some faith and it worked for me well enough to become a believer. Thanks again!


papakevin 11-04-2011 09:05 PM

4 Attachment(s)

OK, here's a couple updates. First, the ruling on the 2x4's, then an attempt to answer the questions on the beams.

So, the verdict is....... it worked! BRIDGEMAN for President! Yes, there still is some bounce in the floor, however the improvements are noticeable and it should be good enough that no additional floor support is needed. My only regret is not completing the entire job all at once, because now I need to go back under and do the 3-4 joists that I didn't do in the living room. And yes, I'm still sore and walking with a slight limp from my last trip in the crawl space....

On a related note, I may go ahead and install underneath the beams that support the floor that supports a couple of the interior walls. (Let me explain...). Apparently the house was built so that the entire hardwood floor was installed first, then the walls were built on top of the wood floor. The walls themselves are not necessarily aligned with the beams, so in some instances the walls are actually resting on the wood floor in between two beams. Seems a little odd to me, but maybe that's the way they did it back in the 40's.

Now the beam question Nealtw asked about. Sad to say I didn't give the center beam a close look, but I did take some random photos while I was under the house. From what I can see, I believe the center beam is actually two 2x10's nailed together, with some 2x 2 block strips installed along the bottom to hold the 2x8's in place. Guessing they did this to rest the 2x8's on the rails, then toe nailed the 2x8's into the 2x10's. Maybe they didn't have joist hangers back then, or maybe this was just the cheap way of doing it. I'm adding some photos for additional review / comments. Don't know if adding anything to the bottom of these joists (like with the 2x4's) would help add structural support or hurt, but open to feedback and discussions.

Bridgeman, thanks again for the suggestion. I really didn't know if it would work, but I did have some faith and it worked for me well enough to become a believer. Thanks again!


papakevin 11-04-2011 09:05 PM

4 Attachment(s)

OK, here's a couple updates. First, the ruling on the 2x4's, then an attempt to answer the questions on the beams.

So, the verdict is....... it worked! BRIDGEMAN for President! Yes, there still is some bounce in the floor, however the improvements are noticeable and it should be good enough that no additional floor support is needed. My only regret is not completing the entire job all at once, because now I need to go back under and do the 3-4 joists that I didn't do in the living room. And yes, I'm still sore and walking with a slight limp from my last trip in the crawl space....

On a related note, I may go ahead and install underneath the beams that support the floor that supports a couple of the interior walls. (Let me explain...). Apparently the house was built so that the entire hardwood floor was installed first, then the walls were built on top of the wood floor. The walls themselves are not necessarily aligned with the beams, so in some instances the walls are actually resting on the wood floor in between two beams. Seems a little odd to me, but maybe that's the way they did it back in the 40's.

Now the beam question Nealtw asked about. Sad to say I didn't give the center beam a close look, but I did take some random photos while I was under the house. From what I can see, I believe the center beam is actually two 2x10's nailed together, with some 2x 2 block strips installed along the bottom to hold the 2x8's in place. Guessing they did this to rest the 2x8's on the rails, then toe nailed the 2x8's into the 2x10's. Maybe they didn't have joist hangers back then, or maybe this was just the cheap way of doing it. I'm adding some photos for additional review / comments. Don't know if adding anything to the bottom of these joists (like with the 2x4's) would help add structural support or hurt, but open to feedback and discussions.

Bridgeman, thanks again for the suggestion. I really didn't know if it would work, but I did have some faith and it worked for me well enough to become a believer. Thanks again!


papakevin 11-04-2011 09:05 PM

4 Attachment(s)

OK, here's a couple updates. First, the ruling on the 2x4's, then an attempt to answer the questions on the beams.

So, the verdict is....... it worked! BRIDGEMAN for President! Yes, there still is some bounce in the floor, however the improvements are noticeable and it should be good enough that no additional floor support is needed. My only regret is not completing the entire job all at once, because now I need to go back under and do the 3-4 joists that I didn't do in the living room. And yes, I'm still sore and walking with a slight limp from my last trip in the crawl space....

On a related note, I may go ahead and install underneath the beams that support the floor that supports a couple of the interior walls. (Let me explain...). Apparently the house was built so that the entire hardwood floor was installed first, then the walls were built on top of the wood floor. The walls themselves are not necessarily aligned with the beams, so in some instances the walls are actually resting on the wood floor in between two beams. Seems a little odd to me, but maybe that's the way they did it back in the 40's.

Now the beam question Nealtw asked about. Sad to say I didn't give the center beam a close look, but I did take some random photos while I was under the house. From what I can see, I believe the center beam is actually two 2x10's nailed together, with some 2x 2 block strips installed along the bottom to hold the 2x8's in place. Guessing they did this to rest the 2x8's on the rails, then toe nailed the 2x8's into the 2x10's. Maybe they didn't have joist hangers back then, or maybe this was just the cheap way of doing it. I'm adding some photos for additional review / comments. Don't know if adding anything to the bottom of these joists (like with the 2x4's) would help add structural support or hurt, but open to feedback and discussions.

Bridgeman, thanks again for the suggestion. I really didn't know if it would work, but I did have some faith and it worked for me well enough to become a believer. Thanks again!


papakevin 11-14-2011 09:06 PM

4 Attachment(s)

This will likely be my last post on this thread unless something else comes up.

Ended up getting a few more 2x4's to finish up the floor under the living room. It might have been a mental thing, but it seemed like I could tell where I stopped putting the 2x4's in the middle, so I went ahead and finished off the room. Execpt for the insulation hanging down, I think it turned out alright.

Thanks again Bridgeman for the idea. Love it when a plan comes together.


papakevin 11-14-2011 09:06 PM

4 Attachment(s)

This will likely be my last post on this thread unless something else comes up.

Ended up getting a few more 2x4's to finish up the floor under the living room. It might have been a mental thing, but it seemed like I could tell where I stopped putting the 2x4's in the middle, so I went ahead and finished off the room. Execpt for the insulation hanging down, I think it turned out alright.

Thanks again Bridgeman for the idea. Love it when a plan comes together.


papakevin 11-14-2011 09:06 PM

4 Attachment(s)

This will likely be my last post on this thread unless something else comes up.

Ended up getting a few more 2x4's to finish up the floor under the living room. It might have been a mental thing, but it seemed like I could tell where I stopped putting the 2x4's in the middle, so I went ahead and finished off the room. Execpt for the insulation hanging down, I think it turned out alright.

Thanks again Bridgeman for the idea. Love it when a plan comes together.



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