DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Framing and Foundation > HillyBilly special lean to lea to temp wall




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Old 04-01-2014, 08:45 AM  
bud16415
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This is the stuff I called Ice guard. We use it up north on problem spots.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Grace-Ice...ct_description

I’m not a roofer and the roof guys may have better advice on your valley.



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Old 04-01-2014, 02:56 PM  
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- House of cards: take the top cards off first… Then fix the table leg the house of cards is sitting on. Never build a house on a rotten table.


Do you want the good news first or the bad news?

I think I have good news. I don’t think any of the new roof is resting on the rotten wood. When someone built the living room onto the kitchen they built the new kitchen roof with it and just left the rotten wood.

Here are some photos.



new-beam.jpg   new-kitchen-roof-lean-.jpg  
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Old 04-01-2014, 03:06 PM  
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And the bad.. I think.

This is what is holding up the load bearing wall and kitchen floor.

I don't know if you can tell, but there is one pier or post and a can supporting everything

holding-up-kitchen-floor.jpg  
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Old 04-01-2014, 03:21 PM  
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The floor was built in steps.

The bedroom steps down into the kitchen which steps down onto the living room floor. Here is the bottom of the load bearing wall and the step up to the kitchen.

Do I try to access the underside of the house by removing some of the kitchen floor? Is it ok that there is only one pier or supporting the floor and load bearing wall? There have to be about 10 supporting the other side of the kitchen/bedroom.

Where do I go from here?

Thanks again!

house-built-steps.jpg  
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Old 04-01-2014, 05:00 PM  
nealtw
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So, still you want to take the old roof out carefully until you prove you are not disturbing the newer roof.
The beam under the floor is what like 1, 2, 3 ply 2x? or what and total length measure iinside house ddn't go under there and best guess distance to post. Then if you can get an eye on it, can you see a sag in it?

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Old 04-01-2014, 08:07 PM  
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Everything in this post is about the construction of the kitchen, right? What condition is the rest of the house in? At some point you have to wonder if the building is worth all the effort and materials and costs. Of course, I don't know your situation and I am not one of the pros, so I can only ask questions from the outside. You certainly have the right guys answering questions for you.

Here's a download with way more info than you need at the moment. I've seen it posted here before and it has lots of details that can be helpful. At the least, it will help with a common language for all the parts and connections:
http://www.awc.org/pdf/wcd1-300.pdf

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Old 04-02-2014, 10:59 AM  
bud16415
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When you say one pier holding it up that’s the one in the middle of the beam? You also have one on each end of the beam? Answer Neal’s question if you can and along with the beam size what’s the length and also the distance between support points (piers)?

The new construction looks like it was put in with the addition and also to work with that bad beam they left. What is the stud spacing on the new wall? Is the new wall directly over the beam in the crawl space.

As to how much to do and the value in doing it. The answer to that is only known to the person with the house. I know in my life my opinion of value changed many times based around my ability to pay for something better. It sounds to me like the OP values having a place that’s his and paid for. And the photos show me they are not afraid of some hard work to make it livable, so based around that and the fact the labor is free this place looks like a lot of labor and a careful use of materials I say keep going and every little step makes it better.

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Old 04-02-2014, 11:16 AM  
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I was just raising the question; I wouldn't try to answer it from where I sit. But it occurred to me that if the whole house looked like this, you could put a trailer on the property and start from scratch.

I see that there are neighbors nearby. I wonder what kind of info they can share about this building.

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Old 04-05-2014, 04:37 PM  
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Thanks Bud for the ice damn link, and slowandsteady for the pdf it should help. I probably should read it before this post.

Slowand Steady:
The rest of the house was built right. The house was free. This is a weekend lake house area. One house was rented because of the economy and there is a 70+ year old woman that might remember something about it being built, but I don’t know how much she knows about construction. I found a paper from 1954 saying that the water was tested as safe, and something about a volunteer fire department in the kitchen wall. I know the initial house was built in 1940. Perhaps the add on was built in 1954.

The shed was built right. It is the size of a two car garage with an A frame. There is electricity but no plumbing. I guess I could build an outhouse and go with the theme. Hook up the tankless water heater in the shed.


I know how you love my ultra drawings so, I have made another.
These are the problem areas of the house. The other side of the house is fine. It is the kitchen roof where all of the water pours off that has caused the problems and the kitchen’s foundation, which may have shifted because of the rotten beam (where the water splashed).

The house was built like steps up/down. There might be one 2x4 under the load bearing ‘wall’ in the kitchen.
I might have exactly the same problem the hillbilly did with the original roof. All of the water from the entire house


Nealtw:
The kitchen is 13’ long
There are 3 piers. The one in the middle is about at 7 1/2 feet between the two.
There are 2 2x4’s as a joist I guess. There is a problem. See photo.

The photo in post #33 shows the stage Right view



Bud:
It was built outside of the kitchen, after it steps down.
I can’t tell where the new wall has been built. Im guessing on top of ONE of the leaning 2x4’s in the crawl space that support the kitchen floor joists.
Post #33 shows the kitchen joists resting on the 2 slanting 2x4’s.
Post #34 shows the step down from the kitchen onto the living room floor. Which would make the load bearing wall resting on nothing structural, just the living room floor.


Maybe the new photos help.

I think if I rip the old kitchen wood out, replace the rotten green beam, and replace the load bearing wall with something like how a garage is built, I should be set. Right? As far as this kitchen mess. Then do what I need to seal the roof and look into gutter…?

If I can get everything except the Big Boy work done I might be able to call a couple of friends to help.

Thanks guys!

lean-house-problems.jpg  
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Old 04-05-2014, 04:39 PM  
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Stage-left-Crawl-Space

There is a pier and beam about 7 1/2 feet in-between the piers on the outside of the house.



stage-left-crawl-space.jpg  
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