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-   -   More Water Damaged Framing with Pictures (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f32/more-water-damaged-framing-pictures-1827/)

JKTrevecca 01-25-2007 08:50 PM

More Water Damaged Framing with Pictures
 
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I have attached a photo or three so you can see what I am working with here. The cause of the water damage was the roof. It has been replaced. But... becuase the water damage was neglected for a long time, This wall has actually begun to sink about 1/2 to 1 inch. (where the sill plate of the wall rotted and the weight of the roof pushed the studs down into the rotted wood)

So... It is a load bearing wall and I know that I have to start by building a temporary wall on the inside to support the weight of the roof. (YES.. I know there should be a header over the window) My question is this.. How can I lift the trusses up the 1/2 to 1 inch that they need to be before re-framing the wall/window? I have thought about using 3 bottle jacks, and jacking each truss up until all are level. Then, building a temp support wall on the interor to hold the height and weight while tearing out and re-framing the rotted wood. (and adding a header to the window). Sound like that (wood) work to you guys and gals?

The reason this is important is the 1/2 to 1 inch drop has caused there to be a very slight valley where the shingles dip down slightly before protruding over the facia board, which is now 1/2 to 1 inch higher than the roof decking)at the edge of the roof. This small valley holds water and if not fixed, I will be right back where I am today.

I hope this makes sence.. Any suggestions on how to lift the trusses or elaborations on my idea will be greatly appreciated.

Daryl in Nanoose 01-25-2007 09:59 PM

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Your definitely on the right track. Instead of three different studs I would build a wall that the jacks would fit under with a double top and bottom plates and three double studs under each truss and screw the top plate to the trusses. When you get it to the right height block and shim the wall and screw it to the floor so nothing can move and then remove the jacks.
Double 2x10 is way more than you need for a beam across the window.

glennjanie 01-26-2007 12:34 PM

Hello JK and Welcome to the Forum:
Daryl has a good plan there. I'll give you an alternate and you can flip a coin or something. Double 2x6 would be a sufficient header.
I would get a 4"X6" beam to cover the affected trusses and 2 basement jacks to do the lifting and leveling. This will give you more room to work on the real problem.
Glenn

JKTrevecca 01-26-2007 04:42 PM

Thank you Daryl and Glenn... Your advice is great!

1. What is a basement jack? Do they cost a lot more than 3 bottle jacks?

2. How close to the existing load bearing wall does my temp wall/jack support wall need to be?

3. If I use the 4x6 method w/ basement jacks.. are the basement jacks (whatever those look like...:confused: ) safe to hold the weight of the structure while i remove and re-frame the wall?

4. I assume that when you said to "screw" the new wall to the floor, you were simply making sure I didn't build a wall that could be kicked out from the
bottom.. Correct? If not, then I might now know what you mean specifically.


Thank you again. I am a Beginner DIY, but more than willing to jump into this stuff. Your forum has been great with providing helpful info already.

Jason

Daryl in Nanoose 01-28-2007 11:02 AM

1. What is a basement jack? Do they cost a lot more than 3 bottle jacks? I have no idea and have never used them but you could just rent them.
2. How close to the existing load bearing wall does my temp wall/jack support wall need to be? I try for 1' since the farther away you get the heaver the load will be on the jacks and also it could mess up the ridge.
3. If I use the 4x6 method w/ basement jacks.. are the basement jacks (whatever those look like... ) safe to hold the weight of the structure while i remove and re-frame the wall? I know that basement jacks are designed for heavy loads.
4. I assume that when you said to "screw" the new wall to the floor, you were simply making sure I didn't build a wall that could be kicked out from the
bottom.. Correct? If not, then I might now know what you mean specifically.
I meant your temp wall so it can not be kicked out.

glennjanie 01-29-2007 11:23 AM

Hello J K:
A basement jack is a 3" inch pipe with a steel pad welded to the bottom and a screw out the top. It can be used from 7'6" to over 8'. You can get them at any building supply store and yes, they can hold the weight and cost less than the bottle jacks. It would be nice to have the basement jacks placed over a floor joist for lifting.
Glenn

JKTrevecca 02-13-2007 08:19 PM

Daryl and Glenn...

Thank you both again for your input. I have built the temp wall, raised the trusses, and torn out the rotted framing.

But... The "rim" joist and about 6 inches of the 3 floor joists in this area also
have signs of rot. I understand how to replace or scab onto the floor joists to add support. I do not, however, know the proper way to repair the rim joist. Do I have to replace the whole 12 foot 2x10 rim joist or is it an acceptable practice to cut/replace just the rotted portion of this piece of wood?

... jason

Daryl in Nanoose 02-13-2007 09:41 PM

Do I have to replace the whole 12 foot 2x10 rim joist or is it an acceptable practice to cut/replace just the rotted portion of this piece of wood?
Shouldn't be a problem replaceing the rotton section. I have done this before with out any problems. Whata think Glenn.


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