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-   Framing and Foundation (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f32/)
-   -   New foundation, old house (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f32/new-foundation-old-house-470/)

Begreen 05-19-2006 09:34 PM

proceeding
 
1 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by inspectorD
Well????
Would love to here what the results are.............
No results yet, but soon I hope. It's taken time for getting a permit, lining up excavator and foundation contractors and deciding on house lifter. We thought we were all set there until today.

The house lifter we had selected has been out twice. The first time he was out he gave us a verbal estimate of $13000 if we wanted the fireplace structure lifted with the house. If we got rid of the fireplace, it dropped $1500 to maybe 11.5. We took a couple weeks to shop around and get a few more quotes. One never got back to us and the other came in at 16,000. I can vouch for this guy, his firm did a friends house, very professional. We also decided to remove the entire fireplace assembly (82 yrs old, very crumbly mortar).

We called the lifter and said we were ready to sign up. He came out again, because he had lost our paperwork over the past 4 weeks it took to get the permit moving and had forgotten about us. Today we finally got the written proposal - $17000 - after we've already pulled the chimney. We're bummed. They have us penciled in for a June 1st lift, but we feel like we're getting fleeced all of a sudden. May fall back to the second bidder if he is still available. What would you do? Is it normal to be off 33% on an estimate of this size?

Begreen 06-01-2006 11:53 AM

2 Attachment(s)

The lift went well. Robbins crew was very professional. They terrorized the house the day before yesterday, and then yesterday, up it went. Estimated weight about 65 tons all sitting on 3 - 40ft. x 12" ibeams. We're 4 feet in the air for the next 3 weeks. Plumbing is now reconnected and we built a bridge to get into the house. Today will be cleanup and assesment. Excavator comes tomorrow. We should be pouring footings by the middle of next week.

The timing was good, both for the weather and the rot I suspected was happening due to the lack of any protective flashing before they put in the patio. We got to it just in time. The front sill will need a rebuild, but all in all the house is in good shape. Every 2x10 floor joist is one solid piece, 36 ft long!

We expect to return to the new foundation in 3 weeks. When it comes down, the house will sit 2 ft. higher. Then we get into landscaping to make it all look right again. Will post more pics as we progress.


Begreen 06-01-2006 11:53 AM

2 Attachment(s)

The lift went well. Robbins crew was very professional. They terrorized the house the day before yesterday, and then yesterday, up it went. Estimated weight about 65 tons all sitting on 3 - 40ft. x 12" ibeams. We're 4 feet in the air for the next 3 weeks. Plumbing is now reconnected and we built a bridge to get into the house. Today will be cleanup and assesment. Excavator comes tomorrow. We should be pouring footings by the middle of next week.

The timing was good, both for the weather and the rot I suspected was happening due to the lack of any protective flashing before they put in the patio. We got to it just in time. The front sill will need a rebuild, but all in all the house is in good shape. Every 2x10 floor joist is one solid piece, 36 ft long!

We expect to return to the new foundation in 3 weeks. When it comes down, the house will sit 2 ft. higher. Then we get into landscaping to make it all look right again. Will post more pics as we progress.


Begreen 06-11-2006 08:58 PM

progress report and question
 
1 Attachment(s)

Footings are now in and wall will be in by the end of the week. It's good to see some construction after all the destruction. We spent the day relocating the trunk supply duct for the heating. It went off to the side in order to clear the chimney. This created some 30 ft. duct runs. Not good with propane heat in an unheated space. With the trunk now in the center, the longest run will be 15' and of course it will now be insulated. So will the interior foundation walls.

This brings up a question for you all. The county is calling for 10.42 sq. ft. of vents for about 1500 sq. feet of crawl space; that's 21 vents! This seems ludicrous. Our foundation will look like a bunker with machine gun ports.

The house has had a total of 4 - 4x12" vents for the past 82 yrs without any issues. You can see one in the upper left of this picture. We have exceptionally dry soil and great drainage. Never a sign of water in the crawlspace and I close the vents in the winter. As I checkout greenbuilding sites and buildingscience.com I am finding that many are working to get code changed and in radon free areas like ours, recommending no vents at all and a tightly insulated crawlspace. This is the direction I am leaning towards.

What does one do when common sense runs into county code?


Begreen 06-16-2006 09:46 PM

Houston, we have a foundation
 
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Foundation walls were poured today. Woohoo! Now we can start cleaning up this big mess and begin returning the house to a normal life. We'll still need to restore the patio and have a lot of landscaping to repair. But the end is in sight I hope. My son and I relocated the trunk duct for the heating to a more central location now that the fireplace won't be blocking it. I'll be adding new insulated runs soon.

The inspector allowed us to use the openings for the house raising Ibeams as vents. Each is 16 x 16, lots of air. I'll screen them for inspection, then will block them up and insulate.


Begreen 06-17-2006 03:16 PM

foundation questions
 
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OK, the forms are coming off. It looks like we are getting some voids and errors. But never having done this, I'm unsure how to call this. One is in a highly visible location. The other is under the crawlspace entry hatch. Is this acceptable and normal? Can it be patched without looking awful? The rest looks very smooth and nice.


Begreen 06-17-2006 03:16 PM

foundation questions
 
2 Attachment(s)

OK, the forms are coming off. It looks like we are getting some voids and errors. But never having done this, I'm unsure how to call this. One is in a highly visible location. The other is under the crawlspace entry hatch. Is this acceptable and normal? Can it be patched without looking awful? The rest looks very smooth and nice.


Begreen 07-16-2006 04:56 PM

Getting back to normal
 
1 Attachment(s)

Systems are getting back to normal now. Patio system should be in by end of the week. We rebuilt the kitchen entry. It was originally a porch, which then got windows added and eventually became interior. When we started tearing into it we found the walls were just clapboard inside and out. No sheathing or insulation. So we reuilt it up to the drip edge.

Also have found that the whole house does not have any wind barrier like tar paper. Suspect we'll be pulling off all the siding and filling any uninsulated wall cavities with blow in insulation, then adding a wind barrier and residing, probably with cedar shingles.

I'm going back to work on Monday. This stage has taken 4 weeks of 12 hr+ days/7days a week. Probably doesn't belong in the DIY forum. This is a huge project. We're getting real tired of living in a construction site. Can't wait to get back to normal living.


todomi 08-05-2007 11:38 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Begreen View Post
Yes, don't you love contractors that come in with no structural regard for the house. What a bummer. I'm a little confused about the final goal todomi. Can't that main beam be replaced without completely raising the house? If the primary goal is to add significant height to the basement, this is the right process. But if it's just to replace the main beam(s) I would think you wouldn't have to go to such extremes.

BTW, progress update. I finally got tired of contractors saying they would show up and then not showing up. We needed to get the house siding restored. So my son and I tackled the project. It took about 9 days of steady work to add, patch and replace the beveled siding. Looks great now and we're ready to paint in two weeks. Although I've never done siding before, the results look great. I would wager my mitered joins on the long runs look better than most.

The last exterior detail is the porch stairs. They were large (8 ft wide) before we raised the house. Now about 32" higher they would be massive. So we are going to put in a wide 6 step stair that will come down to a 6 x 8 landing. Then the landing will have two 3 ft wide steps on both sides that bring one down to the ground-level gravel path around the house. The stairs will be craftsman style with side walls clad in beveled siding. That will be the final touch.

And as to the energy retrofits, they've paid off nicely. The heat pump worked well. We had an unusually cold spell in January but I used the woodstove as our supplementary heat instead of the electric resistance coils. This winter our average heating bills were under $60/month. And the floors were so much more comfortable with the newly insulated crawlspace below.
I was going to see if I could flitch another beam together, I am not sure I can do it that way because the location of the stairs. A Structural Engineer, I know suggested using a steel plate under the location of the cuts, but that would still require the use of floor jacks. I want to get rid of the use of floor jacks completely. I really hope there is another way, I will see the Structural Engineer tomorrow. I really didn't mention any other option with him, but I think he didn't realize my desire to get rid of the floor jacks, the last time we talked about this. He even surveyed the damage, what he suggested was a quick fix. I don't want a quick fix, I want it to look like those hacks were never here. I am also planning to add a 2 car garage and addition living space to the property, it may even be attached. Depending on how the architectural drawings turn-out. The addition won't have a basement, however. It will be slab on grade, for the garage area. Believe me, if there was an easy way to fix this without permanent use of floor jacks, let me know? I would rather not have to go to this extreme, but I am 6'-4" and the basement current joist height is like 6'-0". I plan to stay here at least 10 years or more. Another question, when you had this done, did you have to completely empty your house of all it's contents: furniture, appliances and etc.?

Also, I was thinking of going geo-thermal, a heat pump doesn't work well in the colder climates, like Ohio.

todomi 08-05-2007 11:38 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Begreen View Post
Yes, don't you love contractors that come in with no structural regard for the house. What a bummer. I'm a little confused about the final goal todomi. Can't that main beam be replaced without completely raising the house? If the primary goal is to add significant height to the basement, this is the right process. But if it's just to replace the main beam(s) I would think you wouldn't have to go to such extremes.

BTW, progress update. I finally got tired of contractors saying they would show up and then not showing up. We needed to get the house siding restored. So my son and I tackled the project. It took about 9 days of steady work to add, patch and replace the beveled siding. Looks great now and we're ready to paint in two weeks. Although I've never done siding before, the results look great. I would wager my mitered joins on the long runs look better than most.

The last exterior detail is the porch stairs. They were large (8 ft wide) before we raised the house. Now about 32" higher they would be massive. So we are going to put in a wide 6 step stair that will come down to a 6 x 8 landing. Then the landing will have two 3 ft wide steps on both sides that bring one down to the ground-level gravel path around the house. The stairs will be craftsman style with side walls clad in beveled siding. That will be the final touch.

And as to the energy retrofits, they've paid off nicely. The heat pump worked well. We had an unusually cold spell in January but I used the woodstove as our supplementary heat instead of the electric resistance coils. This winter our average heating bills were under $60/month. And the floors were so much more comfortable with the newly insulated crawlspace below.
I was going to see if I could flitch another beam together, I am not sure I can do it that way because the location of the stairs. A Structural Engineer, I know suggested using a steel plate under the location of the cuts, but that would still require the use of floor jacks. I want to get rid of the use of floor jacks completely. I really hope there is another way, I will see the Structural Engineer tomorrow. I really didn't mention any other option with him, but I think he didn't realize my desire to get rid of the floor jacks, the last time we talked about this. He even surveyed the damage, what he suggested was a quick fix. I don't want a quick fix, I want it to look like those hacks were never here. I am also planning to add a 2 car garage and addition living space to the property, it may even be attached. Depending on how the architectural drawings turn-out. The addition won't have a basement, however. It will be slab on grade, for the garage area. Believe me, if there was an easy way to fix this without permanent use of floor jacks, let me know? I would rather not have to go to this extreme, but I am 6'-4" and the basement current joist height is like 6'-0". I plan to stay here at least 10 years or more. Another question, when you had this done, did you have to completely empty your house of all it's contents: furniture, appliances and etc.?

Also, I was thinking of going geo-thermal, a heat pump doesn't work well in the colder climates, like Ohio.


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