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Old 09-30-2013, 05:46 PM  
nealtw
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What I would have done different is, bring the foundation concrete up to 1 1/2" below the bottom of the joists used a 2x6 sill plate, slid in new joist and removed all the old junk. That would be the plan anyway, you always run into reasons why the best plan might be so simple. You are a long ways down the road, so I think you should continue and we will just thru you curve balls from time to time.
Did you notch the new joists to get them above the sill beam? Did you leave room for a rim joist? The rim joist sits on the out side of the sill and you nail thru it to the joists.



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Old 09-30-2013, 07:31 PM  
NYSandyvictim
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The 2x10's should be spanning from beam to sill. Make sure your beam is strong enough. it wouldnt hurt to sister boards on to that too.
Use a long straight edge across floor joists to make sure you dont have dips or humps
I would jack up more than one floor joist at a time. Other than that i think your making the best out of a hack job.
yes all the sisters i am putting in span from sill to middle beam getting rid of all the multiple little boards that were put all over the joists. The middle beam is the most solid part of the house. Its rock solid and in great condition. Size is 6x10 i believe and has 10" wooden piers under it about every 8' . I have been using a long 10' piece of red oak as a straightedge as well as my 6 and 8' box level. Trying to get it at least 1/4" out in 8' . The ones i did so far are less then 1/8" out in 8' and dead level in both directions. Before we found the mess under the new plywood we decided to take up the floor because it was over 2" out in like 4-5ft. Funny thing is the first thing we said to the contractor is we need flat floors and at the time it wasnt nearly as bad as after he finished. In contract it says level and flatten all floors and shore up any beams/joists. Right now we are waiting for the building dept to take action against him. The floors is only 1 thing of many things that were messed up. guy couldnt even do drywall right. Most held in by 2 screws and plastic water bottles wedge in the bottom. We also paid him to insulate the crawlspace and that wasnt done either. He put a few pieces of bat in a couple joists that were already laying in the dirt when we took the floor up.


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Old 09-30-2013, 07:50 PM  
NYSandyvictim
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What I would have done different is, bring the foundation concrete up to 1 1/2" below the bottom of the joists used a 2x6 sill plate, slid in new joist and removed all the old junk. That would be the plan anyway, you always run into reasons why the best plan might be so simple. You are a long ways down the road, so I think you should continue and we will just thru you curve balls from time to time.
Did you notch the new joists to get them above the sill beam? Did you leave room for a rim joist? The rim joist sits on the out side of the sill and you nail thru it to the joists.
That is interesting . I didnt know that would be ok to do. We never had any concrete around the house. It always was just wood pier and sill beam and open on the sides. I figured that concrete and rim joists were for a different type of foundation. The contractor put some cinderblocks under the sill beam to close it off a little. Not much room for a rim joist.The way the house is the vertical wall studs go down and sit on the sill beam. I can see a rim joist giving nice support though and closing it off the air much better.

I did notch a couple of the joists i put in on the top of the joist not on the bottom. The deepest notch on top was about 1.5" .I had to notch 1/4" out of one joist on the bottom . Reason is the contractor also put the sill beam in a little crooked. It slopes down a bit going towards the back of the house.

Right now a have run into a little issue. The joist under the wall i got raised all the way up and a new joist sistered to the side of it in the front however the joist is still twisted or tilting foward. I have been trying to get it to go straight but it wont budge. It might be just set crooked now from being like that over time. Anyway i can get it to go straight again? By straight i mean vertical .Right now its tilted like ( / ) and im trying to get it back like this ( i )
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Old 09-30-2013, 08:32 PM  
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3 Options
Blocking to next floor joist( will probably need lags or ledgerlock screws to grip enough to pull joist straight)
Shim new floor joist until its straight. (leave old tilted)
Remove old floor joist.

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Old 09-30-2013, 08:40 PM  
nealtw
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The notching of the joists is a no no, so before you close that up we will get that fixed up.
To the question on the joist leaning, first have a look and make sure you haven't got nails or such that is stopping it from moving. Then decide whether the top or the bottom is in the right place.
If it is right on the top of the joist then cut a block that would fit between that joist and the next joist on each side. Install the one block high on the side that is right and the other low on the other side, as you hammer it in to place the joist will straighten up. If the next joists start to bend too, more blocks between joists even if you have to right across the run. Joists that are more than 7 ft should have bridging or solid blocking anyway. As you do blocking you want to keep an eye on the joists for straightness. Crooked joists make putting plywood down a pain.

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Old 10-06-2013, 12:35 AM  
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I thought notching the top of the joist wasnt too bad at around 2" or so .Also only the sill side is notched and center beam side is not. Is that not ok. I cant think of any other way to do it though.

I was able to get the joist a little bit more straight . Then i did as suggested above and did the blocking trick then shimmed out the bottom of the old joist a little and pulled the top in with some lags then sister in the new 2x10 . Worked out good as now i also have some joist on the other side of the wall sticking out for the plywood to screw to so now i wont need to add a blocking strip for the plywood. Just finished up rebuilding the stud wall that was over the joist from scratch. Straight as a arrow now and 90 degrees from the perpendicular wall. Full studs too not pieces like it was. Now im moving to the next joist starting the kitchen. I had foundation company come out to my house yesterday for a estimate on fixing some foundation stuff here. Unfortunatly they werent really able to help since what they really do is ok on my house . Center beam support ect and werent able to do anything with the sill beam and under boiler due to the low height of my crawlspace. They did say that the only thing they can see wrong with the sill beam replacement span is its on a slope going down towards the back of the house.The piers they said looked ok except for a the one at the back of the span which is lower but intact and not leaning or shifting which leads them to believe its running pretty far down into the dirt. They may have been able to replace that pier but he said it probably wouldnt be worth it for us.Something with the soil condition being at sea level ,escavating ect. As far as leveling the floor with the sloping sill he said to pretty much do what i am doing and shimming the 2x10's on the sill for that area to make up for the sloping with it only be a 8ft span or so where its sloping. They did say the rest of the joists were a mess and i got a real butcher contractor.They must be fixed of course like im in the process of doing.

thanks for the replies so far.

Not sure what im going to do yet at the end of the kitchen where the guy cut the joists completely off the sill beam ,put a cross headerish 2x6 and connected the cut joists with joist hangers to it. he then has the header sitting on 2 piers he made. So basically the joists there are not connected to the house.They are just on those 2 piers on the inner crawlspace of the house not reaching the sill beam. The piers are also sticking up too high and when i remove the header and sister a2x10 the pier may be in the way of getting the 2x10 on the sill .

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Old 10-06-2013, 01:08 AM  
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I guess I was looking at the notches your guy did in his peices, I would like to see a photo of yours. With his the space above the beam would have been filled and the joist hung in hangers would be the correct way to do it. If the peirs are in the way, you could cut them down or frame around them with a double on each side and double blocking front and back with hangers and hang the missing joist off the double blocking, the blocking would be joist material. Or just change the layout to have a floor joist on each side of the pier, just screws up the plywood a little.

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Old 10-12-2013, 11:17 PM  
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Found another big prob that has to be fixed asap. I may call someone in to fix this but would like to know the best way to fix it anyway in case i do decide to do it. On the kitchen wall (load bearing) the wall plate is rotted and cracked. There was a beam under between the wall plate and joist like(the same ones that are under the stairs but the contractor cut it out in that area of the crack and i can already see it has sagged down a lot. This looks like a major problem to me. this is the only wall perpendicular to the floor and ceiling joists in the kitchen . This wall also holds the stairs and ceiling/2nd floor joists. You can see in the pic how theres the wall with the beam between the joist and the plate and where the beam ends the plate sinks down a lot all the way to the actual floor joists.

From the pics what do you think i need to do to fix this. Im thinking i will need to build a tempory support wall somehow then replace at least part of the wall (not the part that holds the stairs) I dont know how i would support the stairs.

I temporarily put a double 2x4 between the joists under the problem area to hold it for a short time(red 2x4's) I still need to fix/sister the joists under the wall too.







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Old 10-12-2013, 11:34 PM  
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Here are some more pics of the problem area

heres the location of the wall shown from further away .Problem is at the end of the wall under where the microwave opening is (sheetrocked in this pic).See how stairs are connected to it. In the forground is the new non load bearing wall i just built replacing the one the contractor built very badly.


whole wall straight on view


Notice the beam/planking that ran between the wall plate and the joist . It sticks out a little in the front and rest of it under the stairs . This was cut under the cracked area and reason it probably broke and sagged.

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Old 10-13-2013, 08:47 AM  
guyod
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I would attach a min of a 2x6 temporarily to the studs. Span from end to at least stud on other side of boxed out hole in wall. Attach it with 2 4" 3/8 lags per stud. I would do this on both sides. Then jack up 2x6 on both sides of wall. If lags start pulling out or it is hard to jack up then stop. Hopefully you can get it up that extra inch to replace the bottom plate. If the wall doesnt want to jack up you will have to cut studs down a little. once the new bottom stud is in straighten out the 2 stud that are crooked. You will probably need sledge hammer.



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Last edited by guyod; 10-13-2013 at 08:54 AM. Reason: add pic
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