DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Framing and Foundation > pier and beam and floor joist repair and leveling




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-30-2013, 10:24 PM  
nealtw
Contractor
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: vancouver, b.c.
Posts: 10,260
Liked 844 Times on 754 Posts
Likes Given: 1463

Default

The probem with the contractors are the real good ones will be reluctant to get involved in the middle of the job and want an engineer to write the instruction or you find another like the one you had.



__________________
nealtw is online now  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2013, 11:29 AM  
NYSandyvictim
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 30
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
The probem with the contractors are the real good ones will be reluctant to get involved in the middle of the job and want an engineer to write the instruction or you find another like the one you had.
yea i know .thats the truth. finding a good contractor in my situation is proving impossible. So many things against me. Between being a disaster zone all good contractors are booked up , rest are price gouging like crazy. Then the few left want the easier faster money making jobs or new construction.Then to throw it on top i also push them away with my current situation with my last shoddy contractor that screwed up my house and didnt finish. Im almost at the point where i dont know what to do anymore. running out of options. Lucklily at least i have some experience in this work and most likely can do it myself even though i doubt myself sometimes on doing the bigger structual stuff. No matter what i always like to do all the research on doing everything before i do it even if i pretty much know how to do it or not. More minds together are always better then one. I thank you for all the advice so far.

I am a machinist/engineer myself so this stuff shouldnt be too hard. Although what i do is cnc manufacturing and cad design which is a bit different from home building. At least if i do it though things will be straight to the thousands of an inch since im use to working with much tighter tolerances lol.

I wish i could get past this structual stuff already and into the finish work though where i have plenty more experience. I have done tons of tile work, hardwood flooring ,drywalling,furniture building etc and damn good at that stuff.


__________________
NYSandyvictim is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2013, 12:49 PM  
bryce
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 152
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

"I wish i could get past this structual stuff already and into the finish work though where i have plenty more experience. I have done tons of tile work, hardwood flooring ,drywalling,furniture building etc and damn good at that stuff. "

Wait till you realize how much mold is coming off the wood. When you see black looking wood it means it's rotten, you can hit it with a hammer and hear the hollow sound too. Not only is it weak structurally, it's toxic. The black mold can be really bad for allergies, the wood

__________________
bryce is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2013, 10:10 PM  
NYSandyvictim
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 30
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bryce View Post
"I wish i could get past this structual stuff already and into the finish work though where i have plenty more experience. I have done tons of tile work, hardwood flooring ,drywalling,furniture building etc and damn good at that stuff. "

Wait till you realize how much mold is coming off the wood. When you see black looking wood it means it's rotten, you can hit it with a hammer and hear the hollow sound too. Not only is it weak structurally, it's toxic. The black mold can be really bad for allergies, the wood
Black wood?So what is your prefered remedy ,demo'ing the entire house and rebuilding from scratch?Moving out?Since what insurance gave us is a joke and most of it was lost with our shoddy contractor thats not a option.If i was rich i probably would just move out and buy another house but us middle class people cant do that. We once had a nice first floor with many nice things until a hurricane by the name of Sandy came through and we had to throw out everything we own. Its been over a year now of living in a bedroom with nothing but a microwave and mini fridge and i need my house back. Obviously you can see i am trying to do as much as possible. There are tons of people in our neighborhood who didnt have insurance that only cleaned there house with bleach,washed out electrical and went on living without doing and renovations.I am trying to do the right thing but realistically.

The only damaged/rotted wood in the house are in the 2 areas i am posting about. The house was gutted before the contractor started doing work putting in subflooring/drywall ect and no other walls are bad like these two. The wood color is all brown(not black) and dry (1920's lumber) except for the very bottom of these two walls which will be taken care of for sure. the house was treated for mold after the storm. Only black mold i found left was in one wall that was not gutted when treated. i have already taken care of that mold though and then sanded and painted the wall with clear zinnzer mold and mildew proof paint.The mold wasnt to bad either im thinking from pics of black mold iv seen searching the internet. It was just a few black spots up to the waterline. Im sure theres probably some more mold under the subfloor but i dont think its bad where i have to knock down my house or move out and the walls have also been dried out professionally so i dont think it would be growing. they brought in huge dehumidifier machines or whatever they are and ran them for days to remove all moisture. The waterline was up to the window sill in the pics.The SE said the house wasnt in bad shape structually minus the two walls that need to be fixed and rest of the floor joists that i didnt get to need sistering but he said theres no way it would fall down or anything other then that.

I think the pics and stupid stuff our shoddy contractor did may be throwing you off.Except for the very bottom the wood is old but fine.White spots on the wall in the pics are sheetrock dust and spraypaint. We told the contractor to remove anymore mold he may have found.Well to act like he did something he just took white spray paint and sprayed everything down.

If you got any advice on what to actually do id love to hear it but just saying your house is rotton and moldy isnt helping me fix much.

In this pic you can see the darkness of the wood is from age being built in 1920.When the wood is cut into its not hollow.There are only a couple studs that are rotted through and those are the studs that i am replacing on bottom of the 2 walls
__________________

Last edited by NYSandyvictim; 11-03-2013 at 02:19 AM.
NYSandyvictim is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-03-2013, 09:14 PM  
nealtw
Contractor
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: vancouver, b.c.
Posts: 10,260
Liked 844 Times on 754 Posts
Likes Given: 1463

Default

In your last photo it appears a heavy beam running the length of the building on the outside wall. Is that correct?

__________________
nealtw is online now  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-04-2013, 06:54 AM  
bud16415
Fixer Upper
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Erie Pa, Pa
Posts: 1,233
Liked 352 Times on 282 Posts
Likes Given: 115

Default

NYSandyVictim

I have been reading this thread all along and haven’t posted as you were getting good advice from others. I have gutted and rebuilt a couple of homes as old as yours or older and I’m also a tool maker by trade and a designer now so we have something in common. I can’t offer a great deal of technical information beyond what you are being given, but I can offer support as I know how a big project working mostly alone will wear you down, and working at the same time at a regular job and doing this part time takes a toll on you mentally and physically. From what I see in your photos you are making real progress and the work you are doing looks a lot better than the so called contractor you had. It’s a real shame people are taking advantage of a bad situation for so many people like that.

What you need is constructive help with the problems at hand and overall support for what you are going thru doing the project. What you don’t need is suggestions of problems you might or might not have down the road without any suggestion of what to do about them. The house I’m ripping apart over the last 6 months is a circa 1900 that’s been standing strong for well over 100 years and the framing is dirty and black and dry. And when I cut into it it’s just like yours as solid and hard as the day it was erected. When you get a whiff of that pine smell when sawing, I always take it in as it’s a sign of the good old strong bones your building has still.

You are taking all the correct steps and when you are done you will have something to really be proud of. During the process you need to stay focused on the rest of life and the truly important stuff like family and health also. It becomes a battle about time and not having enough of it and when you get a free couple hours we view it as I could get this or that done on the project. I find it hard to force myself away to just do something removed from the project like dinner or a movie with a special person, but you need to do that and come back with fresh body and ideas.

I have been working on this latest house with my girlfriends grandfather in his 80’s and a retired toolmaker and home builder. He has a saying he keeps saying each time we get a little step done he says “Every little thing makes it better.” After hearing that about a thousand time when I’m working alone I find myself saying it.

If I lived closer I would hope I would come over and offer a hand. Good luck I will keep reading as I find this thread very inspirational as I’m sure many others do as well.
Bud

__________________
bud16415 is offline  
nealtw Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2013, 12:51 PM  
NYSandyvictim
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 30
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
In your last photo it appears a heavy beam running the length of the building on the outside wall. Is that correct?
Yup 6x6 sill beam running down the sides of the house that joists sit on . It has 16" wooden piers holding it up every 12' and a cinderblock wall between pier spans.
__________________
NYSandyvictim is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2013, 01:00 PM  
NYSandyvictim
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 30
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bud16415 View Post
NYSandyVictim

I have been reading this thread all along and haven’t posted as you were getting good advice from others. I have gutted and rebuilt a couple of homes as old as yours or older and I’m also a tool maker by trade and a designer now so we have something in common. I can’t offer a great deal of technical information beyond what you are being given, but I can offer support as I know how a big project working mostly alone will wear you down, and working at the same time at a regular job and doing this part time takes a toll on you mentally and physically. From what I see in your photos you are making real progress and the work you are doing looks a lot better than the so called contractor you had. It’s a real shame people are taking advantage of a bad situation for so many people like that.

What you need is constructive help with the problems at hand and overall support for what you are going thru doing the project. What you don’t need is suggestions of problems you might or might not have down the road without any suggestion of what to do about them. The house I’m ripping apart over the last 6 months is a circa 1900 that’s been standing strong for well over 100 years and the framing is dirty and black and dry. And when I cut into it it’s just like yours as solid and hard as the day it was erected. When you get a whiff of that pine smell when sawing, I always take it in as it’s a sign of the good old strong bones your building has still.

You are taking all the correct steps and when you are done you will have something to really be proud of. During the process you need to stay focused on the rest of life and the truly important stuff like family and health also. It becomes a battle about time and not having enough of it and when you get a free couple hours we view it as I could get this or that done on the project. I find it hard to force myself away to just do something removed from the project like dinner or a movie with a special person, but you need to do that and come back with fresh body and ideas.

I have been working on this latest house with my girlfriends grandfather in his 80’s and a retired toolmaker and home builder. He has a saying he keeps saying each time we get a little step done he says “Every little thing makes it better.” After hearing that about a thousand time when I’m working alone I find myself saying it.

If I lived closer I would hope I would come over and offer a hand. Good luck I will keep reading as I find this thread very inspirational as I’m sure many others do as well.
Bud
Thanks Bud, helps a lot. You are right. For the last year i have done literally nothing but work and then work on the house from when i wake up til i go to sleep. It does take a toll on the body. My idea is that ill take a break once i have the structual stuff done and the floor closed up. I am worried and in a rush right now to get this stuff done before the weather starts really getting cold which is not much longer as its getting cold already. Right now we dont have the floor in and no baseboard heating in so when the winter comes we are really screwed if those things arnt done. Its not gonna be easy to live with no heat or floor in NY winter. It doesnt help that i have a really bad back too so im working through the pain everyday trying to do as much as possible.

I love your girlfriends grandfathers saying “Every little thing makes it better.” .Thats what i keep saying to my mother as well.
__________________
NYSandyvictim is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2013, 05:39 PM  
nealtw
Contractor
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: vancouver, b.c.
Posts: 10,260
Liked 844 Times on 754 Posts
Likes Given: 1463

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NYSandyvictim View Post
Yup 6x6 sill beam running down the sides of the house that joists sit on . It has 16" wooden piers holding it up every 12' and a cinderblock wall between pier spans.
No I ment above the wall, is that a beam above the header over the window?
__________________
nealtw is online now  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2013, 07:06 PM  
NYSandyvictim
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 30
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
No I ment above the wall, is that a beam above the header over the window?
oops sorry. Yes is appears to be a pretty big beam up there. The house wasnt built very conventionally back when it was built in 1920. They have even used stuff like railroad ties which that beam may be.


__________________
NYSandyvictim is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter DIY Home Repair Forum Replies Last Post
Leveling a Pier and Beam home PFriend1 Flooring 3 07-22-2012 01:48 PM
Raising and leveling pier and beam house jsvrcek Walls and Ceilings 1 08-15-2009 01:43 PM
pier & beam leveling estimates Frennzzee Framing and Foundation 1 11-11-2008 08:58 AM
Pier repair/minor leveling TheHammer Framing and Foundation 1 08-25-2007 03:33 PM
1-800-help with my pier and beam floor gjimenez Introductions 2 07-11-2006 09:24 PM