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Old 11-05-2013, 08:19 PM  
nealtw
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That beam seems to be doing all the work of a header, I would double up the studs on each side of the window and don't worry about the header over the window and just rip the junk out.



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Old 11-07-2013, 02:10 AM  
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That beam seems to be doing all the work of a header, I would double up the studs on each side of the window and don't worry about the header over the window and just rip the junk out.
Still build a temp support wall though correct?


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Old 11-07-2013, 06:10 AM  
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With the beam above, I'm not sure you have any need for the small header over the window, as long as that beam has good support on each side of the window. A temp wall wouldn't hurt.

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Old 11-10-2013, 10:45 PM  
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So the contractor we got to come check the job out came back with a estimate and went over the job with us. Im thinking we will go with them. They seem like they know what they are doing and have a very good rep so hopefully it will work out this time. They only do structual work and not kitchen renos ect. They came with a structual engineer who took a bunch of load numbers ect for all of the house and job thats being done. They will be rebuilding the 2 walls completley. Also running new joists ,beams and pier under our slab boiler room which right now is unsupported from the last contractor cutting all of the joists there and not putting anything back which is causing the slab to crack. Lastly they will be adding a steel i-beam from the front of the house to the rear of the house on the 1st floor ceiling with 3 post going down to the main bearing center beam on the foundation. This was needed because right now we have in the ceiling 2x8's 16"oc spanning the full width of the house (20') and the second floor has always been extremely bouncy. Hopefully that should stiffen the house up immensely. The only bad part is they arnt really doing any finish work except for the outside wall that was bulging out which they will reinstall the window , reinsulate and drywall and try to redo the siding in that area. For the ceiling we will have to redo some of the drywall and relocate a ceiling fan as well as do the finish work building the new i-beam posts into the wall with drywall. Electrical and drywall however is easy stuff to do.

There estimate for all of this was 18k. What do you guys think ?Worth it? Im thinking just the i-beam alone would add a lot to the resale value of the house.I however dont know pricing for this stuff. They would be starting the day after thanksgiving.

I also just finished sistering or replacing all the floor joists on one side of the kitchen and adding cross bridging except for 2 joists under the point load of that broken wall in the kitchen which i am still a ;little uncomfortable to tackle yet.All new double 2x10's now held in with carriage bolts and pretty much perfectly level so where getting there little by little.They feel solid as a rock now. I calculated it to a deflection number of L1920 so that should be well strong enough for granite tile which needs a deflection of L720 and porcelin at L360.

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Old 11-11-2013, 12:49 PM  
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It might sound a little high but the fact that they brought an engineer and went over the whole house is a big plus and you will likely have a house better than it's ever been is a plus. Make sure that includes an engineers report when done and take pictures of what's being done. That info is great at re-sale when inspectors can go over what has been done to the house. Floor deflection should improve slightly when you install the plywood subfloor.

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Old 11-12-2013, 05:01 AM  
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I know 18k is a lot of money, but to me that doesn’t sound too bad for that amount of work and material. With them taking care of the heavy structural problem it will give you more of a secure feeling going into the finish work. You will be able to pace yourself better knowing the house is safe and sealed up at that point. Get it all down in writing as Neil pointed out.

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Old 11-14-2013, 12:08 AM  
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Thanks guys. A bit more comfortable now. I wish they would start already. Its getting super cold. 29 degrees in my house right now. That brings up another question,Insulation. The shoddy contractor i had installed r13 fiberglass batt between the joists. Most have already fell to the dirt since he barely even stapled them in. I know batt shouldnt be used in between joists in crawlspaces anyway. What is the best way to insulate the subfloor. I have a lot of unordinary conditions making a insulation job a little harder then most.

First my house doesnt have a rim joist. As im sure you seen the joists lay on the sill beam and wall studs also go down to the sill beam. That leaves the joist cavities open to the outside. I would like to insulate these open cavities.Would rigid foam work here even without a rim joist.

second my crawlspace is really shallow. Too shallow for a spray foam guy to get under there and when the plywoods back on theres no way under there at all.

Third i live in a area at sea level so every once in a while there is sea water under the house in the crawlspace. You cant stop it from coming in as sea water goes where it wants even through the soil. So therfore any encapsulation is not possible.

fourth due to again living at sea level the foundation needs to be unsealed and have gaps for the water to get in/out by Fema code so not to pressureize the crawlspace causing to house to come off its foundation in a flood. We have these gaps between our piers and concrete block though which is below the joists/sill beam. I know they do make these auto opening/closing flood vents however they are too big to fit in our shallow crawlspace .

What are my best options in these circumstances?

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Old 11-14-2013, 06:39 AM  
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Here we would be required to cut and fit solid blocking in the rim joist area and then solid blocking between the studs at the floor level. Rim blocks for earth quakes so they don't lay over and stud bay blocks for firestopping. We usually see bat insulation under the floor, no vapour barrier as the plywood is a solid surface and the other side wants to breath. They often have chicken wire to hold it up and keep critters out.
We also see solid foam cut to pressure fit and sealed with some special glue or caulking, that might work for you but is would want to be installed so it is in contact with the plywood when your done. tricky but not impossible I guess. Thoughts??

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Old 11-14-2013, 07:08 AM  
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I’m no expert on this subject for sure, but it seems if you are going to have salt water below the floor from time to time and draining out the crawl space is going to have to be viewed as the wet side of the insulating system. For me I would try and block vapor from the bottom up with some heavy plastic below the joists. I then like foam as Neil suggests. I don’t know if they can spray from the top filling the cavity the plastic would make or not. I have used the foam sheets cut to as close fit as I could and then used spray cans to fill the cracks. I’m not sure how you get below to attach a barrier? Maybe a system where you attach strips that hang out and then a sheet of foam bedded in with a line of spray foam. That way all your work would be from above. If you fit say 1” sheets against these strips maybe then have it foam filled? The experts are sure to post.

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Old 11-14-2013, 07:37 AM  
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Quote:
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Here we would be required to cut and fit solid blocking in the rim joist area and then solid blocking between the studs at the floor level. Rim blocks for earth quakes so they don't lay over and stud bay blocks for firestopping. We usually see bat insulation under the floor, no vapour barrier as the plywood is a solid surface and the other side wants to breath. They often have chicken wire to hold it up and keep critters out.
We also see solid foam cut to pressure fit and sealed with some special glue or caulking, that might work for you but is would want to be installed so it is in contact with the plywood when your done. tricky but not impossible I guess. Thoughts??
The main thing that keeps the joist stiff and not able to rack or topple is that they are connected to the wall studs coming down on the side of each joist but yes there is also solid blocking stiffing on both sides in the center of each span. there also is crossblocking (looks like a wall plate but not one piece) at floor level of the wall studs. As much as i researched this was a popular way to build homes in the early 1900's. A rim joist seems a better idea to me though as it makes wall studs more open to the elements to rot over years.

From what the spray foam guy and a couple contractors told me so far the best bet is to insulate the perimeter (aka rim joist area) with foam board and seal with spray foam. I like this idea but still wanted to get other opinions on it. I like your idea with doing between the joists with rigid foam as well . Doing both should help a lot. I have seen a video where they nailed furring strips halfway up the joists so that the rigid insulation sits flush with the top of the joists.Looked like a nice trick.


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