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-   -   replace load bearing wall with beam (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f32/replace-load-bearing-wall-beam-12931/)

minimii 01-10-2012 12:59 PM

replace load bearing wall with beam
 
5 Attachment(s)

We just bought an old two story house (1959). There is a load bearing wall inside of the room on the first floor. On top of this room are second floor bedrooms, bathroom and a porch. The headers of this load bearing wall (the orange part in the attachment house3.jpg) are damaged by termite. The wall carries the weight of the second floor, a wall and siding on second floor and ceiling of the second floor (attic floor).
We are trying to replace the wall with new header beam. I have talked to different contractors and got somehow inconsistent answers. I would appreciate any help and input here.
The current header beam consists of two 2x10 and there are double 2x4 top plates on top the header beam. One segment of the current header has span of 10' and the rest header span are 3' to 5' with post of two or three 2x4s. We would like to have as few posts in the room.
The questions are:
1) If we use double Georgia-Pacific 1 3/4"x9 1/2" LVL as header, what's the biggest span we can have? Is two of these LVL enough? One contractor suggests we put three LVL side by side.
2) Do we still need top plates when the new header is one long piece? Do we need bolt and glue the LVL together? How much stronger is one 3 1/2" thick beam vs two 1 3/4" together?
3) What type of post should we use? We have been suggested to use 4x4, 6x6 and we are thinking to use 3" steel column.
4) Any special treatment of the ground needed for the post? Right now the wall is on the edge of the house foundation. Contractors say they would just put the post directly on the concrete. But I found out the ground is only a layer of 1/2" thick concrete on top of (unfilled) cinder block. I am thinking either put a large steel plate on the ground and then put the post on top to distribute the weight, or dig a few small holes and try to fill the cinder block with liquid cement. I would like to avoid digging big 3'x3' post hole in the middle of room, also there might be a sew pipe under.
Thanks


minimii 01-10-2012 12:59 PM

replace load bearing wall with beam
 
5 Attachment(s)

We just bought an old two story house (1959). There is a load bearing wall inside of the room on the first floor. On top of this room are second floor bedrooms, bathroom and a porch. The headers of this load bearing wall (the orange part in the attachment house3.jpg) are damaged by termite. The wall carries the weight of the second floor, a wall and siding on second floor and ceiling of the second floor (attic floor).
We are trying to replace the wall with new header beam. I have talked to different contractors and got somehow inconsistent answers. I would appreciate any help and input here.
The current header beam consists of two 2x10 and there are double 2x4 top plates on top the header beam. One segment of the current header has span of 10' and the rest header span are 3' to 5' with post of two or three 2x4s. We would like to have as few posts in the room.
The questions are:
1) If we use double Georgia-Pacific 1 3/4"x9 1/2" LVL as header, what's the biggest span we can have? Is two of these LVL enough? One contractor suggests we put three LVL side by side.
2) Do we still need top plates when the new header is one long piece? Do we need bolt and glue the LVL together? How much stronger is one 3 1/2" thick beam vs two 1 3/4" together?
3) What type of post should we use? We have been suggested to use 4x4, 6x6 and we are thinking to use 3" steel column.
4) Any special treatment of the ground needed for the post? Right now the wall is on the edge of the house foundation. Contractors say they would just put the post directly on the concrete. But I found out the ground is only a layer of 1/2" thick concrete on top of (unfilled) cinder block. I am thinking either put a large steel plate on the ground and then put the post on top to distribute the weight, or dig a few small holes and try to fill the cinder block with liquid cement. I would like to avoid digging big 3'x3' post hole in the middle of room, also there might be a sew pipe under.
Thanks


minimii 01-10-2012 12:59 PM

replace load bearing wall with beam
 
5 Attachment(s)

We just bought an old two story house (1959). There is a load bearing wall inside of the room on the first floor. On top of this room are second floor bedrooms, bathroom and a porch. The headers of this load bearing wall (the orange part in the attachment house3.jpg) are damaged by termite. The wall carries the weight of the second floor, a wall and siding on second floor and ceiling of the second floor (attic floor).
We are trying to replace the wall with new header beam. I have talked to different contractors and got somehow inconsistent answers. I would appreciate any help and input here.
The current header beam consists of two 2x10 and there are double 2x4 top plates on top the header beam. One segment of the current header has span of 10' and the rest header span are 3' to 5' with post of two or three 2x4s. We would like to have as few posts in the room.
The questions are:
1) If we use double Georgia-Pacific 1 3/4"x9 1/2" LVL as header, what's the biggest span we can have? Is two of these LVL enough? One contractor suggests we put three LVL side by side.
2) Do we still need top plates when the new header is one long piece? Do we need bolt and glue the LVL together? How much stronger is one 3 1/2" thick beam vs two 1 3/4" together?
3) What type of post should we use? We have been suggested to use 4x4, 6x6 and we are thinking to use 3" steel column.
4) Any special treatment of the ground needed for the post? Right now the wall is on the edge of the house foundation. Contractors say they would just put the post directly on the concrete. But I found out the ground is only a layer of 1/2" thick concrete on top of (unfilled) cinder block. I am thinking either put a large steel plate on the ground and then put the post on top to distribute the weight, or dig a few small holes and try to fill the cinder block with liquid cement. I would like to avoid digging big 3'x3' post hole in the middle of room, also there might be a sew pipe under.
Thanks


minimii 01-10-2012 12:59 PM

replace load bearing wall with beam
 
5 Attachment(s)

We just bought an old two story house (1959). There is a load bearing wall inside of the room on the first floor. On top of this room are second floor bedrooms, bathroom and a porch. The headers of this load bearing wall (the orange part in the attachment house3.jpg) are damaged by termite. The wall carries the weight of the second floor, a wall and siding on second floor and ceiling of the second floor (attic floor).
We are trying to replace the wall with new header beam. I have talked to different contractors and got somehow inconsistent answers. I would appreciate any help and input here.
The current header beam consists of two 2x10 and there are double 2x4 top plates on top the header beam. One segment of the current header has span of 10' and the rest header span are 3' to 5' with post of two or three 2x4s. We would like to have as few posts in the room.
The questions are:
1) If we use double Georgia-Pacific 1 3/4"x9 1/2" LVL as header, what's the biggest span we can have? Is two of these LVL enough? One contractor suggests we put three LVL side by side.
2) Do we still need top plates when the new header is one long piece? Do we need bolt and glue the LVL together? How much stronger is one 3 1/2" thick beam vs two 1 3/4" together?
3) What type of post should we use? We have been suggested to use 4x4, 6x6 and we are thinking to use 3" steel column.
4) Any special treatment of the ground needed for the post? Right now the wall is on the edge of the house foundation. Contractors say they would just put the post directly on the concrete. But I found out the ground is only a layer of 1/2" thick concrete on top of (unfilled) cinder block. I am thinking either put a large steel plate on the ground and then put the post on top to distribute the weight, or dig a few small holes and try to fill the cinder block with liquid cement. I would like to avoid digging big 3'x3' post hole in the middle of room, also there might be a sew pipe under.
Thanks


minimii 01-10-2012 12:59 PM

replace load bearing wall with beam
 
5 Attachment(s)

We just bought an old two story house (1959). There is a load bearing wall inside of the room on the first floor. On top of this room are second floor bedrooms, bathroom and a porch. The headers of this load bearing wall (the orange part in the attachment house3.jpg) are damaged by termite. The wall carries the weight of the second floor, a wall and siding on second floor and ceiling of the second floor (attic floor).
We are trying to replace the wall with new header beam. I have talked to different contractors and got somehow inconsistent answers. I would appreciate any help and input here.
The current header beam consists of two 2x10 and there are double 2x4 top plates on top the header beam. One segment of the current header has span of 10' and the rest header span are 3' to 5' with post of two or three 2x4s. We would like to have as few posts in the room.
The questions are:
1) If we use double Georgia-Pacific 1 3/4"x9 1/2" LVL as header, what's the biggest span we can have? Is two of these LVL enough? One contractor suggests we put three LVL side by side.
2) Do we still need top plates when the new header is one long piece? Do we need bolt and glue the LVL together? How much stronger is one 3 1/2" thick beam vs two 1 3/4" together?
3) What type of post should we use? We have been suggested to use 4x4, 6x6 and we are thinking to use 3" steel column.
4) Any special treatment of the ground needed for the post? Right now the wall is on the edge of the house foundation. Contractors say they would just put the post directly on the concrete. But I found out the ground is only a layer of 1/2" thick concrete on top of (unfilled) cinder block. I am thinking either put a large steel plate on the ground and then put the post on top to distribute the weight, or dig a few small holes and try to fill the cinder block with liquid cement. I would like to avoid digging big 3'x3' post hole in the middle of room, also there might be a sew pipe under.
Thanks



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