DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Framing and Foundation > Saving an Old, sad Garage




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Old 11-25-2007, 06:29 PM  
Bull
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Inspector, thank you so much for your reply. Good to see there are other northeasterners on here, too.

I found two articles on hammerzone.com that seem like they will be of help to me. One is about using come-alongs to straighten a garage that is out of square. The other is about replacing a rotten sill. This latter article also shows how to lift a wall at a time. Here they are:

http://hammerzone.com/archives/framecarp/liftmove/straighten/garage1/winch.htm

http://hammerzone.com/archives/framecarp/repair/sill/garage/rotted.htm

I also have a book, by Nick Engler, titled Renovating Barns, Sheds, and Outbuildings. This has information about various types of foundation repair and how to lift a building. But, I had not seen the suggestion of using cement blocks before. I like that idea, since I can do it myself. Can you lay block in the winter, or is the mortar not going to be able to set up properly?

There does not appear to be any insect damage on this garage. Most of the studs appear to be in fine, solid condition. Of course, the sill could stand replacing, but that is the only wood that has any rot that I have found.

I am a bit unclear about the sequence of events relating to replacing sections of the sill with a 6x6, on top of the existing foundation, and then rebuilding that foundation with block. If the building is resting on a new 6x6 sill on top of the foundation, how can I then demo that foundation and rebuild it?

I really appreciate your reply. It seemed a but quiet in here!



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Old 11-26-2007, 07:09 AM  
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Default Yup, Just another nutmegger....

Basically those hammerzone articles are the way to go.
It is saying the same thing as I am....only with pictures.
The 6x6 will be your support while you demo the concrete below. The article has you supporting the upper top plate at the roof area. This is a great way to start. The issue is when you remove that concrete there is nothing left for support. The 6x6 will be a better solution because you can put a 4 foot 6x6 section underneath and support it from both ends from the sides, like a bridge. Then you can leave a block out where the cross piece support is, and fill it in later. These supports will need plenty of surface support at the sides. Basically spread out a couple of scrap boards to distribute the weight in a large pattern. Like a crane does when it sets up its outriggers is the best visual I can come up with. Bear with me , I'm home with the kids cold they handed to me.
Mortar can be done if it is over 40 degrees if you cover it with an insulating blanket, or keep it warm. If you don't the mortar will freeze and you will get no bond. Then it moves when it wants.Tarps and a heater help if you want to tackle this in the winter. Otherwise I would find some warmer projects...and get this one all set up for spring. It will wait.



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Old 11-26-2007, 08:43 AM  
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Ok, I believe this is becoming clearer to me.

So, the 4 foot section of 6x6 will span the area of foundation wall that I have removed to rebuild with block? In other words, I will only be demolishing and rebuilding the foundation in one 4 foot section at a time?

Sorry about your cold...but it;s not so bad to rest at home with some hot coffee on a cold day and browse the net, is it?

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Old 11-29-2007, 05:43 AM  
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Default Basically...yes

The way I look at a project is by doing it in sections it is first of all safer. The next is cost, this way is less expensive than a one time shot. Then by doing it in sections is also not as overwhelming in scope. The last is the satisfaction in absolutly knowing after doing so many sections...the correct way to do it.
Good luck, go to the library and ask when you need some help.

Anyone else have a link or any info....helping is easy

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Old 05-12-2008, 01:06 PM  
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I'd just like to bump this up top, in case anyone who hasn't seen it before would like to respond. I'm hoping to get the structure as straight as possible in the next month or so.

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Old 05-12-2008, 05:46 PM  
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Default Spring is here...and summer

Sounds good...waiting for pics.

Keep it straight with a string line.

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Old 05-12-2008, 06:44 PM  
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How would I use the string line?

I was going to start with the Hammerzone article about straightening by using a come along and tow hooks on opposite corners. Hopefully, that will get me to where I need to be, and I thought I'd just keep checking things with a level.

I'm pessimistic of my abilities, but really hope I can make this thing more usable, then freshen up the exterior and look less like a hillbilly.

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Old 05-13-2008, 05:19 PM  
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Default Hillbilly...

They wrote a song about that.
Basically get the corners plumb...not level. Just so you get the terminology. Then run a piece of string from the corners across the top plate , or bottom plate and this will tell you where it needs to go.
You'll do fine, learning is a process. You will learn, and we will help.
Then you will be on to the next project.

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Old 06-25-2010, 09:49 PM  
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Default Consider it do-able

I was faced with a similar, but a little less daunting project. My garage from my 1935 house, (almost identical to yours) was in sad shape very similar to yours, except that the foundation was in much better shape. I had to replace all of the rotted sole plate, (mud sill, or sill plate depending on where you live) and studs. I did that part all by myself in about 3 days of working only about 3-4 hours a day. If i had to do it again, I could do it much quicker. Now, before I continue, I want everyone to know that I do not claim to be an expert, and I dont do things like most people. I adress what matters, and I disregard what doesnt. I'm not going to get a level out when repairing a 75 year old structure. It will only make it harder in my opinion, and thats what this is, "my opinion". First I nailed some approximatley 4' x 4' plywood sheets in the corners of the garage so it wouldnt collapse like a rag doll. then I nailed a 2x6 across the whole south wall and jacked it up using the 2x6 as the pressure point for the jack ( the jack in this instance was a section of small tree truck about 4" thick, I cut it about 2" longer than the hieght of the 2x6 and then wedged it diagonally under the 2x6 and hammerred it under from the bottom end. . this took all of the pressure off the bottoms of the studs and made the raise up a little bit, and because the 2x6 was pushing up on the studs, they pushed up on the top plate and away from the sole plate. if I put the pressure on the top plate it might have pulled away from the studs instead of the studs pulling away from the sole plate. The 2x6 eliminated that problem.
There were no anchor bolts, a lot of older structures dont have them. Even if it would have, the sole plate was so rotted, I think it wouldn't have put up much of a fight. Then I sawed about an inch off the bottom of the studs to make room for the new sole plate. The bottoms of the studs were badly rotted as well, so that was easy. I then simply slid in the new pressure treated plate, lowered the wall onto it, and sistered new treated studs to the old ones. I used metal brackets and toe nailing. I probably dont need the metal brackets, but at 57 cents a piece, I figured why not. Then I did the back wall and then the north wall and the two little front sections were brick so I didnt need to do them. I then put in anchor bolts by drilling into the foundation through the sole plate, putting epoxy into the holes, and then putting in the anchor bolts. I have never heard of anyone else doing this, but I figure if it didn't have any for the first 75 years, My epoxied bolts will work much better. And yes, my garage is about and inch or so shorter now towards the back, but nobody knows that but me, I'm 41 years old and will be long dead before it becomes a problem again. And you would need a measuring tape to know that. Hope I have helped you or somebody else reading this. For the foundation I am fixing the morter between the block with morter repair stuff, and I had to fix some cracks in the floor, but they were just cracks. The floor had not gone "titanic" like yours. I might do a resurface for about 40-50 bucks if I get time. There are some little things that I havent mentioned here, they were not major and I'm sure a normal person could figure it out and come up with thier own solutions. This is intimidating but really not rocket surgery. You can do it, the key is to relax and eyeball. Just my opinion.

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Old 11-04-2010, 06:15 PM  
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If the building is sound .start with the floor ,take it out complete with the mud under it. put in road mulch gravel and compact it. Brace the side walls from side to side, top of one wall to bottom of other side. both walls. Lay a sill on the gravel 2 ft from each side
and matching sills on ceiling joist. lift the building with studs a little to long. with a selection of studs you can lift it 1 or 2 inches. replace the bottom sill with treated wood
remove and replace foundation. don,t forget to get below your frost level with the footing and gravel under floor wants to be as deep as the footing with good drainage so it won't break again. my kind job. good luck



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