DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum

DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Framing and Foundation (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f32/)
-   -   Taking rough opening height from 80" to 82.5" (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f32/taking-rough-opening-height-80-82-5-a-8599/)

swindmill 02-07-2010 08:29 AM

Taking rough opening height from 80" to 82.5"
 
I have a doorway that had odd sized double doors and the rough opening is 48.5" x 80". I need to make the RO 32" x 82.5".

I can't be sure that the wall is not load bearing. It is an interior wall that was added about 5 years ago, but at the same time, the attic was finished into a bedroom, so I suppose it's possible that this wall now helps support that.

The header is made by two 2x4's sitting side by side from jack stud to jack stud, rather than stacked, and there are 3 cripple studs.

How do I go about reconstructing this into a 32" x 82.5"?

GregC 02-07-2010 09:03 AM

As long as you have king studs going all the way up you will be OK to re-frame. if not, use temporary support (shoring) next to your widest point of framing and install new header, jack and king studs then remove temporary studs you used for shoring. If you are load bearing from above room, I would suggest installing a 2x12 header. This will give you added support for above and you will be safe either way. ;)

swindmill 02-07-2010 02:52 PM

After looking closer, the header is two 2x6's. As far as it being load bearing or not, it's hard to tell. The wall separates two different height ceilings. The attic BR is directly on top of the downstairs BR, which is what this doorway leads to. When the attic room was added, the ceiling above the downstairs BR was dropped about 2 feet to make more room upstairs. So, the ceiling on one side of the wall in question is 8.5 ft., and on the other side of the wall (hallway), the ceiling is about 11 ft. The king studs in this doorway go up to the top plate, which I obviously can't see past. The top plate is at the 8.5 ft ceiling, but the wall obviously goes up to 11 feet. There is a ledge in the upstairs room above the hallway. I hope that description makes some sense. If so, does it shed any light on whether the wall is load bearing or not?

Bud Cline 02-07-2010 04:53 PM

If the header is made of 2X6's you have room to modify it by cutting into the 2X6's. Nothing is going anywhere under these circumstances.:) Use a Sawzall.

swindmill 02-07-2010 06:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline (Post 40378)
If the header is made of 2X6's you have room to modify it by cutting into the 2X6's. Nothing is going anywhere under these circumstances.:) Use a Sawzall.

That would be a lot easier than tearing down drywall and reframing. I'd have to cut 2.5" out of the 2x6's. If it's safe to do, then that's what I'll plan on.

...I'm thinking I could probably just take 2" out and go to 82" since my floors are hardwood and I won't be putting down carpet on either side of the door.

Bud Cline 02-08-2010 09:53 AM

If the existing header is made of 2X6 and is now a nominal 48" wide and you are closing the opening down to 32" the remaining 2X6 (after alteration) will easily continue to carry the distributed load. This is a simple modification as far as I can see. Even if the wall has become load bearing with previous modifications the moments won't necessarily change.:)

Wuzzat? 02-09-2010 02:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline (Post 40378)
If the header is made of 2X6's you have room to modify it by cutting into the 2X6's. Nothing is going anywhere under these circumstances.:) Use a Sawzall.

Yes.
If you want, bolt a 1/4" thk x 3.5" steel plate to the 2x6 to keep the bending strength the same or more than it was before you notched out the bottom 2".
If I can find the formula it may say you can use 1/8" thk steel. I'll post back.

Bud Cline 02-09-2010 04:24 PM

The 2X6's should already have a piece of plywood between the two of them to add strength and come up to the required 3-1/2" width to match the adjacent 3-1/2" studs. Not to say steel wouldn't be better but not sure there is room for it anywhere now.:)

Wuzzat? 02-09-2010 07:32 PM

I didn't see the 48" to 32" reduction.

The 32", 3" high arrangement is 18% weaker, other things being equal. It's [48"^4]/[5.5"^3] vs. [32"^4]/[3.0"^3]. The 48" has less deflection and so it is stronger.

All the other stuff drops out of the equations.

swindmill 02-10-2010 06:26 AM

Thanks for the replies and information. There is not a piece of plywood between the 2x6's. Does this mean I absolutely should use a steel plate where I notch out 2"? Will that make up for the weaker arrangement, or is the weaker arrangement even going to be something to worry about? I'm working on the upstairs now, so I could pull a floor board up and see which way the joists are running if that is important.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:03 PM.