DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Framing and Foundation > Weeping tile installation




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-03-2014, 01:37 PM  
Chris
Guru of nothing
HRT_MODERATOR.png
 
Chris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,243
Liked 111 Times on 95 Posts
Likes Given: 30

Default

Gravel will not sink to below the plastic pipes. I install perf pipe underground in large commercial retention/detention systems all the time and it will lock together and not move. Gravel is the only thing you can backfill with that does not need to be compacted according to the municipalities and engineers I work for. Here are a couple pics of some of the larger type systems I have built and many are just perf pipe sitting in the middle of rock that is many feet deep. The only thing I would look for in rock is to get washed rock, it will be much cleaner and keep all that silt out of the system.



cudo-4.jpg   cudo-5.jpg   cudo-6.jpg   1052.jpg   phone-pictures-1-1-1037.jpg  

1055.jpg  
__________________
Chris is offline  
nealtw Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-03-2014, 02:46 PM  
Jungle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 322
Liked 28 Times on 25 Posts
Likes Given: 31

Default

"Not sure why you ask advice, you always do your own research until you find the one guy who agrees with some idea that you have. "

It's not my idea. I've just learned this by searching the web. Seems like a good solution to me, perforated pipes act like gravel. My guess is you'll get longer life because you can clog 4 pipes now before need to be repair it vs just one pipe.

That's why i bounce it on to you guys to see what you say. These building science is changing and improving all the time. I think you can see that the gravel can easily work it's way bellow the pipe and then start to pool up in bad way.

My other question is how many hours would it take a mini-ex to dig the foundations 25x25' and about 4' bellow grade?

I also found a deal on 2.5" polystyrene for the outside. Do you think 2.5" is enough or should i double it 5", will it make a difference?



__________________

Last edited by Jungle; 06-03-2014 at 02:49 PM.
Jungle is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-03-2014, 03:10 PM  
nealtw
Contractor
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: vancouver, b.c.
Posts: 9,704
Liked 790 Times on 705 Posts
Likes Given: 1353

Default

The gravel alone will transfer the water, after years of pumping water out of my dads basement which just ran back in the city installed sewer lines and when we hook up to that we discoved water would run into the gravel around the sewer pipe. We built a sump around the sewer pipe and water drained into that gravel for the twenty years they lived there after that.

In new construction here they place 4" ridged foam either against the foundation to the height of the floor or on the flat under the slab around the inside against the foundation both 2ft wide.
When the do a pan slab which is pored as one foundation and floor they install foam on the outside, they also put a flashing under the house wrap and over the foam to keep the water out.
I don't know how they get rid of water that wicks up thru the concrete and usually finds its way out thru the exposed concrete between the siding and ground level.

__________________
nealtw is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-03-2014, 03:20 PM  
Chris
Guru of nothing
HRT_MODERATOR.png
 
Chris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,243
Liked 111 Times on 95 Posts
Likes Given: 30

Default

The problem with stacking pipes like you mention is that first there are voids in between them and second they can oval or collapse over time. If you are using thin walled drain pipe you will need the rock around it to help protect the pipe. Instead of using many pipes you should just upgrade from 4" to 6" or 8" or whatever size you feel is adequate. Like I said before the rock locks into itself and will help the pipes. We install all our new sewer pipe and storm drain pipe with a rock bedding and rock to a foot above to help keep the pipe round.

__________________
Chris is offline  
nealtw Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-05-2014, 05:06 AM  
Jungle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 322
Liked 28 Times on 25 Posts
Likes Given: 31

Default

"The problem with stacking pipes like you mention is that first there are voids in between them and second they can oval or collapse over time. If you are using thin walled drain pipe you will need the rock around it to help protect the pipe. "

But there is nobody walking beside the house or heavy weight? The rocks may will cause the problem of crushing the plastic. Actually the gravel would be cheaper than buy 3 more pipes. So i might as well get the gravel rock hard pipe.
I don't expect it to be in used from rain but only in the spring if snow is not removed from the house etc.
I wonder if the ditch in the front will be deep enough for the drainage? I guess dig down there a bit, the town shouldn't mind.

This is my situation now,

/watch?v=VEh9SS6R10E

Which is not good -bothers the allergies. I think the blue skin and polystyrene sheets will be the main improvement. After all that i can scrub it all down the inside walls and floor with bleach and hopefully the problem will be solved complete. But it is hard to believe right now. Maybe a citrus greaser on the concrete?

__________________

Last edited by Jungle; 06-05-2014 at 05:09 AM.
Jungle is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-05-2014, 06:37 AM  
mudmixer
Contractor
 
mudmixer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 590
Liked 44 Times on 36 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

"Weeping tile", as you describe them are not, and not necessary for "floods" The operate 24/7 and reduce the moisture in the soil around and over them. They have been used for many centuries in various configurations.

Perforated pipe should be placed with bottom of the pipe slightly below the bottom of the footing.

Holes are placed in the bottom half to collect the moisture in the backfill and surrounding soil. Permeable/porous material (2" thick) should also be placed on the drainage cloth before the pipe is laid. The location of the holes determines how low the soil moisture can be reduced.

The pipe/tile are laid horizontally in a collection are since water seeks it own level and naturally flows to a sump or a solid walled pipe that is sloped to carry the water to a lower area.

The pipe actually improves the life and stability of the soil because it eliminates the excess moisture that causes instability and high lateral pressures on walls. Interior drain tile and in some cases reduce the upward pressure on a floor slab and reduce floor cracking, but the main use is to provide a stable dry basement.

I know builders that automatically install both interior and exterior drain tile on EVERY home they build because it is so cheap to do during construction. For many homes interior drain tile are cheaper than exterior if there are detached steps, patios and landscaping in place.

Dick

__________________
mudmixer is offline  
3
People Like This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-09-2014, 03:08 PM  
Jungle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 322
Liked 28 Times on 25 Posts
Likes Given: 31

Default

Okay that sounds good. Typar under the pipes. How much large gravel do i need 4 inches x 100 feet x 1 foot? But a 1" first then the pipe then 3" over it?

Do you think city will mind if i put the drainage channel going out to the ditch by the road?
I have to call the 1 call dig people, i should mention the channel i think..
I should use solid no holes pipe for that part going to the ditch?

__________________

Last edited by Jungle; 06-09-2014 at 03:13 PM.
Jungle is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-09-2014, 03:45 PM  
Chris
Guru of nothing
HRT_MODERATOR.png
 
Chris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,243
Liked 111 Times on 95 Posts
Likes Given: 30

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jungle View Post
Okay that sounds good. Typar under the pipes. How much large gravel do i need 4 inches x 100 feet x 1 foot? But a 1" first then the pipe then 3" over it?

Do you think city will mind if i put the drainage channel going out to the ditch by the road?
I have to call the 1 call dig people, i should mention the channel i think..
I should use solid no holes pipe for that part going to the ditch?
You are going to have to account for the gravel around the pipe as well. How wide of a trench? If you figure a 1' wide x 100' long x 4" deep of solid matter would be 2.4 tons. It will likely take a bit less.

You will have to talk to the city to see if they will let you connect to the ditch

Dig-a-lert 800-422-4133 is the number I call, pretty sure they are nationwide. It's a free service and required before you dig or if you hit something it will automatically be your fault. They are not going to care what you are connecting to, they are only going to ask you what you are putting in which is storm drain and they are going to ask you how you plan on excavating the area.

You will want to use solid pipe anywhere you are not going to have gravel around it.
__________________
Chris is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-11-2014, 11:01 AM  
Jungle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 322
Liked 28 Times on 25 Posts
Likes Given: 31

Default

So is 2-1/2" of polystyrene enough around the foundations? Or i can get 5" for $300 more?

__________________
Jungle is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-16-2014, 01:19 PM  
Jungle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 322
Liked 28 Times on 25 Posts
Likes Given: 31

Default

I am thinking to make two exits for the weeping tile. One out to the ditch. the other to backyard. Can the weeping tile drain out to say 50' more of perforated pipe to the back yard and the water will just go to yard?
Seems better than relying on only front trench. Also less of problem of adjusting the pitch so 100' can drain. How much pitch for each 25' side of the house? 6"

I am having the same problem with my gutter, 25' is too long and better to have two downspouts.
The perforated access pipes seems like a great idea. I could put the pipe near the trouble spots, were the gutter tends to leak. The pipes going straight up will suck ground water right away. With the access pipes it will be always easy to clean out too. Maybe 3-4 access pipes should be good.



__________________
Jungle is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter DIY Home Repair Forum Replies Last Post
Digging Trench for Interior Weeping Tile il_reno Framing and Foundation 4 09-26-2011 10:03 PM
Weeping tile installation between two houses 3 feet apart sportsknutt General Home Improvement Discussion 2 03-16-2011 09:04 PM
Basement Still Leaks AFTER Weeping Tile Repair babyalligator Framing and Foundation 3 09-28-2009 08:27 AM
Marble Tile installation hints/tips? Hack Flooring 11 01-14-2008 10:15 AM
Quadrant tile installation lowtaren General Home Improvement Discussion 1 09-03-2007 12:51 PM