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-   -   1/2 inch Copper around existing Vent Stack? (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f33/1-2-inch-copper-around-existing-vent-stack-3367/)

knewshound 01-13-2008 06:48 PM

1/2 inch Copper around existing Vent Stack?
 
I was thinking I could ease a curve in, notch the 2X4 and saddle over the pipe, but one way or the other I sure need to get this 1/2 inch copper past the 2 inch vent stack.

Working the PCV vent stack would be a much easier idea but I have few ideas on how to sung it into the wall to give me room.

http://img443.imageshack.us/img443/5...pipekg8.th.jpg

Ideas anyone?

Cheers,

knewshound

ToolGuy 01-13-2008 08:09 PM

If you try bending it you could kink it and cause a leak, which might not show up till later. Better to use a street and a regular 45 to bump it out.

guyod 01-13-2008 09:49 PM

I dont see an issue with putting a 1/2 inch pipe around a 2" pipe in a 3 1/2 '' space. Using street 90's and 45's you can make any angle in small spaces. street means that the one side fits into another fitting. if your not good with sodiering you can convert copper to cpvc or even use a stainless steel bradded hose. Im not sure about the codes in your area they might prohibit anything other that copper and galvanized steel. they make fittings called snake bite which copper or cpvc slide into the fitting and your done.

guyod 01-13-2008 09:57 PM

you can also use soft copper tubing that you can bend. just dont mix it up with 1/2 flare tubing.

glennjanie 01-14-2008 10:05 AM

Hello Knewshound:
Guyod has the best remedy for the case you have. Soft copper (in a roll) will use the same fittings that the hard copper uses. Use a spring bender ( which prevents kinks ) to make the shape you need in the copper, replace the ell that is shown with a tee and solder the new pipe in. This is a close place to work and subject to fire danger, keep a fire extinguisher handy. You might consider renting an electric soldering tool to keep down flames.
Glenn

guyod 01-14-2008 01:58 PM

electric solder tool? dont think i that before. how does that work? could of saved me alot of stress full moments. knowing the stud is on fire but the solder still hasnt liquified yet. hoping i could put the fire out before it spread. bad memories..

glennjanie 01-14-2008 03:57 PM

I'm glad you asked, I had never looked it up before. You can find it at
http://www.msvalves.com/sting.html
I had one of these when I taught Plumbing to the inmates in a prison. Can you imagine what they could do with a Turbo-Torch?
Glenn

guyod 01-14-2008 05:41 PM

Thanks for the web site. I would love to have one of those in my tool box. I doubt i will ever be about to find a place to rent one of those. Rental places never have the stuff i want. And the stuff i do need are way to much money compared to what they are to buy. a couple days of renting them and i could buy it. maybe not as good of brand but still gets the job done.

glennjanie 01-15-2008 11:35 AM

If you do that much soldering it would be a great tool to have. Their picture only shows the business end; it comes in a box about 10 X 10 X 36 and has wheels on it. It is very similar to a 'buzz box' welder. It does a good job with any type solder though and is not so quick to burn your flux out before you can get a solder joint made, like a turbo torch does.
I know what you mean about the rental places letting you pay for their equipment. I suppose that's how they make money. You know, it wouldn't be so bad if they replaced some of it once in a while. It seems like about half of their stuff is junk that won't run when you get it to the job.
Glenn

Hack 01-15-2008 12:09 PM

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I had nearly the same situation with my tub vent. It ran up the middle of the wall, and I needed to get 1/2" copper past it horizontally. My plumber cut the vent pipe and installed two 22 1/2 degree elbows, pushing the vent toward one side of the space, then drilled out the stud at the opposite edge to run the pipes. He put nail plates over the pipes to insure that I didn't drive screws into the pipes...

The two elbows weren't perpendicular to the wall, but rather at an angle, so the vent pipe went sideways and backward if that makes any sense...

Unfortunately, I didn't get a picture of that section of the plumbing before I closed up the wall, so I made you a drawing. This is a cross section of the wall, showing how he moved the vent toward the right, and ran the two 1/2" pipes to the left.


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