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-   -   Basement bathroom without digging up the floor? (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f33/basement-bathroom-without-digging-up-floor-9887/)

Scrobo 09-06-2010 10:31 AM

Basement bathroom without digging up the floor?
 
I'm rebuilding the basement in the house. I have a concrete floor with about 6feet 7inches of space from floor to ceiling.

I'm adding a bathroom and I have been looking into buying a Saniplus macerating toilet. it says you can attach a sink and shower/tub to it and it will pump the gray water out as well so you don't have to dig up the floor.

My question is does the shower still require a p-trap to be installed? The pump has a back flow valve installed in the waste-pipe... I've not got a lot of space to play with to get a proper shower installed and a tub isn't an option as the purpose for the basement being redone is to have a family member move in. They cannot use a tub and they are 6ft tall.

Any opinions on these macerating toilets? Or good ideas to install a stand up shower?

Redwood 09-06-2010 11:44 AM

A gravity drain if at all possible should be used a requirement by code in many locations. The cost and reliability is much better.

If the existing drain cannot be reached with proper pitch, a pump up system may be used. Macerating systems while a good choice do have some limitations and in many cases an ejector pit in the floor is a better choice. In particular you mention a 6' 7" ceiling height which will be a problem for the raised subfloor under the shower needed for installation of the required p-trap.

A macerating system would be fine for a 1/2 bath in your application but the 8" raised floor would kill any idea of a shower.

An ejector pit would allow you to have the shower p-trap buried in the floor.

mudmixer 09-06-2010 02:18 PM

In most of the world a, discharge from a toilet is not considered gray water. In India, where dual waste water systems are used, all toilets and kitchen sinks must be connected to the sanitary sewer, but showers and floor drains in any wet room (kitchens, baths, etc.) can be connected to the gray water discharge.

Check your local codes since they always out-trump any manufacturers claims and instructions.

Scrobo 09-06-2010 04:43 PM

Well... I guess if a p-tap is required I am up the creek without a paddle in that respect. I'll look up "ejector pit" on google and see what that is :)

I'm still going to install the sink and toilet for him. The sewer pipe is slightly above the floor so a regular toilet isn't an option without putting a pedestal under it to raise it up considerably. Maybe one of those "old people" showers that you sit in would be more of an option due to the lack of head room. I have to offer some sort of solution for him and the idea of a tub is not going to fly as for concerns of slipping and falling etc. Plus getting in and out... Better safe than sorry I suppose.

Thanks for the information.


Quote:

Originally Posted by mudmixer (Post 48318)
In most of the world a, discharge from a toilet is not considered gray water.

Sorry. I kinda threw too much info in that question. I understand the toilet refuse would not be gray water, I was referring to the sink and shower wastewater. { I'd consider the toilet to be brownwater. :) }

Redwood 09-06-2010 06:12 PM

The ejector pit would mount in the floor and have the drain pipes run to it under the slab. It would also have to have a pipe running up to catch a vent through the roof.

Here is a pretty decent ejector pit...
912 Preassembled 24" x 24" Sewage Systems | Zoeller Pump Company

handyguys 09-07-2010 12:14 PM

The original poster doesn't mention where his drain lines are. I don't see anything that would require a macerating toilet other than the desire to not bust up concrete. If the drain lines are below the slab I would never use something like a saniflow. And, as was said, if the drain line are above the slab level an ejector pit would be a better option. (And save some headroom too)

Redwood 09-07-2010 05:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scrobo (Post 48322)
The sewer pipe is slightly above the floor so a regular toilet isn't an option without putting a pedestal under it to raise it up considerably.

In his second post it was mentioned... ;)


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