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-   -   Freezeless Yard Hydrant - Leak (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f33/freezeless-yard-hydrant-leak-17148/)

brewer55 12-29-2013 09:25 AM

Freezeless Yard Hydrant - Leak
 
2 Attachment(s)
I've got a yard hydrant on my property that when fully closed, leaks. Having just moved here and not familiar with these types of spigots, I'm not sure where the adjustment should be made or, if it requires a replacement.
I've attached 2 pictures. You can see that to stop the flow of water, the handle is not fully closed. I noticed yesterday that it had started leaking again as it moved slightly from the position that keeps the water flow stopped. I've not yet figured out this property on where the cutoff is for the yard spigots so, I a little concerned about making a small problem a bigger one. I have a cutoff in my basement for the house, but, I'm not sure if the 3 water lines on the 6 acres comes from the house, or directly from the well at the front of my property.

Speedbump 12-29-2013 10:41 AM

That's an oldie for sure. I haven't installed one of those since moving to Florida 30 some years ago.

The actual valve is underground below the frost line. You would have to dig it up to fix it and while you have it dug up, it might be a good idea to just replace it.

nealtw 12-29-2013 11:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Speedbump (Post 97779)
That's an oldie for sure. I haven't installed one of those since moving to Florida 30 some years ago.

The actual valve is underground below the frost line. You would have to dig it up to fix it and while you have it dug up, it might be a good idea to just replace it.

Just always wondered about these valves, the valve is below frost line, what about water left in the riser pipe.

brewer55 12-30-2013 05:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nealtw (Post 97808)
Just always wondered about these valves, the valve is below frost line, what about water left in the riser pipe.

When the handle on the hydrant is turned off, water drains from the shaft through a small hole in the base and into the ground. This is the purpose of these types of yard hydrants so that they do not freeze up during the winter months.

bud16415 12-30-2013 06:16 AM

When I install one of these I dig the hole a foot or more deeper than needed depending on soil. Fill the bottom of the hole with gravel so the water has a place to drain. They are very common up here mostly with farmers with cold out buildings and such. As to adjusting it I'm not sure. Go to a farm and garden or building center and take a look at a new one and see if anything is adjustable. Might be time to replace. Find the shut off and if you don't have one put one in.

Speedbump 12-30-2013 07:02 AM

I don't know where you are located, but since it's almost January, the frost might be getting ahead of you for digging up the old one. The Weather on the news this morning showed the entire North as a freezing tundra.

Wuzzat? 12-30-2013 01:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brewer55 (Post 97766)
I'm not sure if the 3 water lines on the 6 acres comes from the house, or directly from the well at the front of my property.

They'll probably be a temperature difference between the water from each source.

Shawner 12-30-2013 10:31 PM

As long as you can get the source water turned off, you should be able to remove the shaft. It's probably just the rubber puck/washer/sealing element that's worn out.

Here's a schematic off google, probably not identical to yours but likely similar:

http://www.plumbingsupply.com/partsforyardhydrants.html


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