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m2244 08-14-2013 04:57 AM

hot water heating products
 
Hello,

My wife and I are in the middle of remodeling our kitchen. We took out a fairly large baseboard heating unit (Something like 28"h x 48"w x 14"deep) That was the only thing heating that entire room, which is actually kitchen and dining room combined. So the kitchen got a little cold in the winter. Now I am trying to figure out what sorts of things I can put in there for heat. I was thinking simple baseboard where the old unit was, about 4' or so. My brother mentioned a toe kick heater under the cabinets but I am not in love with having a fan to run.

Does anyone have any other suggestions?

nealtw 08-14-2013 06:16 AM

1 Attachment(s)
If you have open floor joists from below you could look at something like this.

m2244 08-14-2013 08:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nealtw (Post 90447)
If you have open floor joists from below you could look at something like this.

How expensive is something like that?

nealtw 08-14-2013 05:28 PM

I have no idea on cost, I would think you would want it on a separate zone with thermostat and all that. I think the pipe is just pex, a friend of mine has this system thru out the house, works well. He dosn't have the aluminium under it, it's just tagged the joists up high with batt insulation beleow it.
Hopefully others here will have some idea of costs.

m-plumber 08-18-2013 06:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nealtw
If you have open floor joists from below you could look at something like this.

What that called

nealtw 08-18-2013 09:16 PM

http://www.greenplumbingtechnology.com/2011/08/06/retro-fit-under-floor-heating-aka-staple-up/
The only time I have seen this is in a freinds house, it was installed when house was built about 12 years ago and seems to work fine.
So now you know what I know.

m-plumber; welcome to the site.

WindowsonWashington 08-19-2013 05:18 AM

I love radiant floor heating.

The "green" folks are starting to wane on this technology a bit though.

Caduceus 08-28-2013 03:21 PM

Just a note: The radiant heating system shown above is not intended to serve as a heat source for the open air of a room. It's designed to simply warm the floor so that it's not cold to your feet. With the plastic tubing's wall and wood between floors acting as a barrier, the radiant system could not produce enough heat to effectively warm a cold room.
The "green" side of this technology is if a tankless boiler is used for the hot water. The "not-so-green" side of this tech. is that you will be using more electricity and gas to run it than if it was never installed...just put on slippers or socks.
These are also very expensive. Boiler, manifolds and labor can get into the $5,000-$10,000 range.
To answer the OPs question, go with your first intinct. A simple baseboard heater.

nealtw 08-28-2013 08:17 PM

Just to clairify, the friend I referred to above has 5000 square feet heated this way, I've never herd a complaint about. I beleive the OP already has a boiler.


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