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-   -   Install Recirculation Pump (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f33/install-recirculation-pump-13332/)

sdupp 02-29-2012 08:08 AM

Install Recirculation Pump
 
I am not much of a plumber but I have installed a few faucets in my day. I would like to install a Metlund S-50 Series Hot Water Recirculation Pump in my master bedroom. I hesitate to attempt this job because the connections under my sink are PEX tubing and the values are FlowTite values (Push On) Below I will include links to the type of values I have and one to the recirculation pump. Any recommendations would be much appreciated.


http://www.accortechnology.com/flowtite.html

http://www.gothotwater.com/d-mand-products/sts-50t-series

Speedbump 02-29-2012 10:03 AM

I'm not a Plumber either, but I don't think you want to install a circulating pump under your sink.

nealtw 02-29-2012 11:06 AM

These things keep the water heater working and add much to the heat bill.

sdupp 02-29-2012 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Speedbump (Post 68697)
I'm not a Plumber either, but I don't think you want to install a circulating pump under your sink.

As you stand around waiting for hot water to arrive at your bathroom sink—or, worse, wander off to do something else while the tap is running—watch what's flowing down the drain: not just water, but all the energy that went into heating it.:confused:

sdupp 02-29-2012 01:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nealtw (Post 68702)
These things keep the water heater working and add much to the heat bill.

This setup saves water. Less intuitively, it also saves energy. That's because the water going back to the heater is usually slightly warm, so reheating it takes less energy. And the pump moves water faster than a typical faucet can, which means less heat loss in the pipes—and less waiting time for you. :rolleyes:

paul52446m 02-29-2012 07:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdupp (Post 68709)
This setup saves water. Less intuitively, it also saves energy. That's because the water going back to the heater is usually slightly warm, so reheating it takes less energy. And the pump moves water faster than a typical faucet can, which means less heat loss in the pipes—and less waiting time for you. :rolleyes:

You are right it will not waste energy. You are already wasting energy waiting to get hot water there and when you are done all that water in the line gets cold again. After you install the pump i would insulate all the hot lines to save more
energy. Paul

Speedbump 03-01-2012 08:13 AM

If your going to install a pump it needs to be in the main hot water line after the heater. It will then be fed to the furthest point where your having to wait for the hot water. Just before that last faucet, you tee into the (probably) 3/4" line and loop back with 1/2" to the bottom of the heater. These pipes will have to be insulated or you will be heating your home with the water heater.

sdupp 03-01-2012 11:03 AM

The only place in my house I have to wait a long time for hot water is my bedroom; therefor this is where I intend to install the recirculation pump. My neighbor has one he put on top of the hot water heater with a timer and also he installed a loop under his bedroom sink. I want hot water when I want it, don’t care for timers. The one I’m using serves the same purpose but allows me to install an on button, motion sensor on or remote control.
Back to my original question, does anyone know how to remove these values? >> http://www.accortechnology.com/flowtite.html

nealtw 03-01-2012 11:36 AM

You might be better off to make your connection in the wall as these valves don't like being removed.

isola96 03-03-2012 05:53 AM

A circulator won't help your problem, maybe a check valve.... Need more information on your setup.


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