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-   -   is there hope? (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f33/there-hope-4154/)

daniel2229 05-06-2008 07:07 PM

is there hope?
 
2 Attachment(s)
Is there any hope of moving these pipes up through the floor joists?

Would sisters against the joists be necessary if a hole is drilled through the joists?

Thanks!

thebobo 05-06-2008 11:37 PM

That's a lot of elbows with no cleanouts; hope no liquids go down that line. Looks like you would be ok, but it's hard to tell how deep those joists are. General rule is holes should be no larger than 1/3 of joist depth, so with 2x8 joists, the holes can be 2 1/2", with 2x10 joists they can be 3 1/8". Keep the holes centered in the joist.

handyguys 05-07-2008 11:09 AM

What thebobo said regarding holes. I wouldn't worry about cleanouts or "liquids". This isn't likely a vent, its most likely for liquids.

The hard part of the project will be matching the ceiling texture!

daniel2229 05-07-2008 11:45 AM

The pipe running horizontally is the drain pipe from my wife's half of the bathroom sink upstairs. The vertical pipe running behind it is the drain pipe leading from my sink.

Why they were not united when the house was built is anybody's guess. All work done by licensed plumbers and passing building inspections, so what was I to know?

handyguys 05-07-2008 12:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by daniel2229 (Post 18811)
The pipe running horizontally is the drain pipe from my wife's half of the bathroom sink upstairs. The vertical pipe running behind it is the drain pipe leading from my sink.

Why they were not united when the house was built is anybody's guess. All work done by licensed plumbers and passing building inspections, so what was I to know?

Thats interesting. That could mean one pipe is a vent and one is a drain. If they are both drains, and both vented. IF, if, if... They the might be able to be combined under the sink and the one in your way of removing the soffit removed entirely. Might...Cant say for sure from here.

daniel2229 05-07-2008 12:43 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I guess I can figure out whether water runs through this pipe by running hot water through it for a few minutes.

My idea is to remove the blacked out area of the photo as it is not a load bearing surface. That will give me room to get my hand back behind the floor joist to make the glue-ups and connections. The rest of the drain will go through the joists as suggested.

daniel2229 05-08-2008 09:04 AM

Well, I have a plumber coming to look at the job in a few minutes; I hope it goes OK. We had two plumbers say no to the job without even coming out to look at it. One said he had done a job just like it, and the customer complained that his floor sagged later.

What is a good ballpark figure for a job like this?

That's not good news for me. We are committed to this now.

If for some reason I have to do this job myself, should I cut the holes for the pipes then dry fit them together before starting to glue up?

handyguys 05-08-2008 11:19 AM

What did the plumber say? Did you ask him if you can just eliminate the pipe and combine with the other one?

glennjanie 05-08-2008 12:44 PM

Handyguy's reference is to making a 'continous drain' under the sinks above. Are they in a vanity cabinet? Could the pipe from one to the other be hidden on the upper floor?
One sink may drain over to the other one's drain, install a trap below the connection and go with the drain to your sink as long as directional fittings are used (which is the only kind made in DWV plastic fittings).
Glenn

handyguys 05-08-2008 12:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by glennjanie (Post 18855)
Handyguy's reference is to making a 'continous drain' under the sinks above.
Glenn

I'm a horrible typist and a werster speller!


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